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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 30: Averill's raid and the winter campaign. (search)
I found Thomas' brigade in Staunton, it having arrived the evening before, ahead of me, and Walker's had moved out to Buffalo Gap, ten miles beyond Staunton on the road to McDowell, at or near which place the enemy under Averill was reported to be. Very early next morning General Imboden came into town, and I rode with him to his camp across the mountain from Buffalo Gap near the Calf Pasture River. He reported that the enemy's force was about five thousand strong and still confronted hiAverill had left the Sweet Springs on the morning of the day before on the road towards Salem. I then started back to Buffalo Gap, and on the way I received another telegraphic dispatch from General Lee, informing me that Averill had entered Salem lso started back to the valley of the South Branch before I arrived. Imboden was ordered to bring his brigade back to Buffalo Gap, that night, for the purpose of being sent after Averill. The question was how to cut off Averill's retreat, as he
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
Bridgewater, 435 Brinly's Land, 246 Bristol, 466 Bristow, 54, 114, 115, 117, 133, 304, 305, 307 Broad Run, 116, 117, 118, 306 Brock Road, 352 Brockenborough, Colonel, 170, 173 Brock's Gap, 334, 339, 382 Brown, Captain, 97, 98, 127, 131, 176, 179, 199, 206, 241, 244 Brown, Captain, Wm. F., 97, 99, 108, 110 Brownsburg, 328 Brown's Gap, 371, 433, 434 Brucetown, 413 Buchanan, 327, 329, 330, 369, 375, 377, 380 Buckner's Neck, 160 Buffalo, 328 Buffalo Gap, 326, 327 Buford, Colonel, 278 Buford, General (U. S. A.), 266 Buford's Depot, 377 Buford's Gap, 377 Bull Mountain, 114 Bull Pasture River, 326 Bull Run, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 16, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 33, 37, 39, 44, 45, 46, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 58, 118, 119, 127, 128, 129, 306 Bunker Hill, 163, 284, 400, 402, 403, 406, 408, 410, 411, 413, 419, 420 Burke's Station, 50 Burnside, General (U. S. A.), 104, 1.05, 106, 131, 132, 150, 151, 158, 165, 166, 169, 180, 189
to the United States alone, etc. All three of them are Virginians by birth.--Richmond Dispatch, April 22. Gen. Milroy, at the head of a reconnoitring force, overtook the rear-guard of the rebel cavalry six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap, Augusta County, Western Virginia. They fled, rapidly pursued by the Nationals. Milroy learned that their main body stopped the previous night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but finding they were cut off at Staunton by Gen. Banks, they bore sd Buffalo Gap, but finding they were cut off at Staunton by Gen. Banks, they bore south-west, through both Bath and Alleghany Counties, toward the James River. A company that was sent by General Milroy down the north fork of the Potomac, in Pendleton County, captured eight rebels, including Barnett, a notorious guerrilla.--New York Commercial, April 25. The ship R. C. Files was captured by the National fleet, while attempting to run the blockade of Mobile, Ala.--New York Tribune, May 9.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.33 (search)
o Strasburg, and on the 5th of May had gone as far as New Market. Blenker's division had not yet reached Fremont, who was waiting for it at Petersburg. Jackson saw his opportunity and determined to join General Johnson by a rapid march to Staunton, to overwhelm Milroy first and then return to his own operations in the Shenandoah. The object of Jackson in this movement is stated in his report of this campaign: At this time, Brigadier-General Edward Johnson, with his troops, was near Buffalo Gap, west of Staunton, so that, if the enemy was allowed to effect a junction, it would probably be followed not only by the seizure of a point so important as Staunton, but must compel General Johnson to abandon his position, and he might succeed in getting between us. To avoid these results, I determined, if practicable, after strengthening my own division by a union with Johnson's, first to strike at Milroy and then to concentrate the forces of Ewell and Johnson with my own against Banks.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
wild-fire, and crowds flocked to the station to see the soldiers and learn what it all meant. No one knew. As soon as the troops could be put in motion they took the road leading toward McDowell, the general having sent forward cavalry to Buffalo Gap and beyond to arrest all persons going that way. General Edward Johnson, with one of Jackson's Valley brigades, was already at Buffalo Gap. The next morning, by a circuitous mountain-path, he tried to send a brigade of infantry to the rear ofBuffalo Gap. The next morning, by a circuitous mountain-path, he tried to send a brigade of infantry to the rear of Milroy's two regiments on Shenandoah Mountain, but they were improperly guided and failed to reach the position in time, so that when attacked in front both regiments escaped. Jackson followed as rapidly as possible, and the following day, May 8th, on top of the Bull Pasture Mountain, three miles east of McDowell, encountered Milroy reinforced by Schenck, who commanded by virtue of seniority of commission. The conflict lasted several Union camp at front Royal. from a war-time sketch. ho
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1864 (search)
ARYLAND--Battery "B" Light Arty.; 2d Eastern Shore and 2d P. H. B. Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--34th Infantry. NEW YORK--1st (Lincoln), 1st Veteran, 15th and 21st Cavalry; 5th Heavy Arty. (Cos. "A," "B," "C," "D"), 30th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. OHIO--23d, 91st, 116th and 123d Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--14th, 20th and 22d Cavalry; 54th Infantry. WEST VIRGINIA--Batteries "B" and "D" Light Arty.; 1st, 4th, 11th and 12th Infantry. Union loss, 130 killed, 650 wounded. Total, 780. June 6: Skirmish, Buffalo GapOHIO--23d and 36th Infantry. WEST VIRGINIA--Battery "B" Light Arty.; 5th Infantry. June 6: Occupation of StauntonCONNECTICUT--18th Infantry. MARYLAND--1st P. H. B. Cavalry; Battery "B" Light Arty.; 2d Eastern Shore and 2d P. H. B. Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--34th Infantry. NEW YORK--1st (Lincoln), 1st Veteran, 15th and 21st Cavalry; 5th Heavy Arty. (Cos. "A," "B," "C," "D"), 30th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. PENNSYLVANIA--14th, 20th and 22d Cavalry; 54th Infantry. WEST VIRGINIA--Battery "B" Li
Raid on Virginia & Tennessee Railroad May 2-19. Battle of Cloyd's Mountain May 9. New River Bridge and Doublin Depot May 10. Meadow Bluff May 24. Hunter's Raid to Lynchburg May 26-July 1. Covington June 2. Piedmont June 5. Buffalo Gap June 6. Lexington June 11-12. Diamond Hill June 17. Lynchburg June 17-18. Buford's Gap June 19. About Salem June 21. Moved to Shenandoah Valley July 12-15. Battle of Winchester July 24. Martinsburg July 25. Sheridan'Callahan Station May 4. Jeffersonville May 8. Abb's Valley, Wytheville, May 9. Cloyd's Mountain May 9. New River Bridge May 10. Grassy Lick, Cove Mountain, near Wytheville, May 10. Hunter's Raid to Lynchburg May 26-July 1. Buffalo Gap June 6. Lexington June 11. Buchanan June 14. New London June 16. Diamond Hill June 17. Lynchburg June 17-18. Liberty June 19. Buford's Gap June 20. Catawba Mountains and near Salem June 21. Moved to the Shenandoah Va
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
Winchester, Va., March 5-12 (Cos. C, E and L ). Phillippi March 20 (4 Cos.). Battle of Winchester March 23. Monterey April 12 (Cos. C, E and L ). Buffalo Gap May 3 (Cos. C, E and L ). McDowell May 7 (Cos. C, E and L ). Scouts to Roane and Clay Counties May 8-21. Giles Court House May 10 (Detachment). StMay 10. Cove Gap May 10. Blacksburg May 11. Union and Pond Mountain Gap May 12. Meadow Bluff May 24. Hunter's Raid to Lynchburg May 26-July 1. Buffalo Gap June 6. Lexington June 11. Buchanan June 13. New London June 16. Diamond Hill June 17. Lynchburg June 17-18. Liberty June 19. Buford's Gap at Droop Mountain November 6. At Beverly and Martinsburg till May, 1864. Hunter's Raid to Lynchburg May 26-July 1. Piedmont, Mount Crawford, June 5. Buffalo Gap June 6. Occupation of Staunton June 6. Diamond Hill June 17. Lynchburg June 17-18. Catawba Mountains June 21. Leetown July 3. About Harper's F
l Smith and Major Higginbotham of the Thirty-first were severely wounded. The regiments were at the capture of Harper's Ferry and the battles of Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. On April 11th they were detached to General Imboden's command in the Shenandoah valley. Under that leader they marched rapidly across the mountains, attacking and routing the enemy at Beverly, and thence by way of Buckhannon, Weston, Bulltown, to Frankfort, Greenbrier county, with several skirmishes. Marching to Buffalo gap, they took cars for Fredericksburg and returned to the army after an absence of just one month. The night following their return they began the march for Winchester, under the brigade command of Gen. William Smith. After marching to York, Pa., they returned to fight at Gettysburg under Ewell, now commanding the corps. Subsequently they participated in all the battles of the Second corps, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, South Anna, Petersburg, Hatcher's Run, Fort Stedman, and f
ing for the Sunday morning service, the trains rolled in with the advance of Jackson's army, all of which was there concentrated by the afternoon of the 5th. Taking the next day for rest and to settle with the Lord of the Sabbath for the day that had, of necessity incurred from bad roads, been taken for a march, Jackson was ready to move against the enemy on the morning of the 7th. During the afternoon of the previous day Johnson marched his brigade from his camps at West View, through Buffalo gap and up the eastern slope of Big North mountain, and at dusk rested his advance, in bivouac, in Dry Branch gap or Notch, of that mountain, 15 miles west of Staunton. Milroy's advance was encamped near the eastern foot of Shenandoah mountain, across the Big Calf Pasture valley, in sight of Johnson's pickets. Jackson's engineers had previously conferred with Johnson, after a reconnoissance of the Federal advance, and it had been agreed that Johnson should send a flanking party, by a detou
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