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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
, 250, 464 Camden, 184 Cameron's Depot, 408 Campbell Court-House, 376 Camp Walker, 6, 12 Canada, 472 Capital, 90, 159, 160 Carlisle, 255, 263 Caroline, 184 Carpenter, 206 Carrington, 176, 179 Carter, Colonel, 445 Carter House, 26, 27 Carter, Lieutenant T. H., 422, 460 Cash, Colonel, 27, 28 Cashtown, 256, 257, 264, 266, 267, 276, 278, 279 Castleman's Ferry, 164, 396 Catharpin Creek, 237 Catlett's Station, 110, 114 Catoctan Mountain, 386 Cavetown, 254 Cedar Creek, 242, 368, 369, 398, 406, 407, 417, 418, 430, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 447, 449, 450, 453, 456, 466, 475, 479 Cedar Creek Pike, 240, 242, 304, 424, 426 Cedar Runj 92, 93, 94, 96, 106, 154, 155 Cedarville, 241, 284, 453, 454 Cemetery Hill, 169, 222, 223, 224, 267, 268, 270, 271, 272, 273, 277, 278, 478 Central R. R., 261, 378, 359, 361, 369, 372, 457, 460, 461, 465 Centreville, 4, 5, 6, 7, 27, 31, 33, 35, 44, 50, 51, 52, 119, 122, 128, 129, 133, 30
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
In the interval of time from the 16th to the 22d of July, the enemy made a demonstration on Hedgesville, forcing back Baker's brigade. Desultory skirmishing was kept up on the front for several days with the enemy, while our infantry was engaged in tearing up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad near Martinsburg. Parts of Jones' brigade were also engaged with the enemy in spirited conflicts, not herein referred to, resulting very creditably to our arms, near Fairfield, Pennsylvania, and on the Cavetown road from Hagerstown, the Sixth and Seventh Virginia Cavalry being particularly distinguished. Accounts of these will be found in the reports of Brigadier-General Jones and Colonel Baker. It soon became apparent that the enemy was moving upon our right flank, availing himself of the swollen condition of the Shenandoah to interpose his army, by a march along the east side of the Blue Ridge, between our present position and Richmond. Longstreet's corps having already moved to counteract
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
under this order of march prescribed — particularly as it was believed that those gaps would be held by General Robertson till he could be reinforced by the main body. I, therefore, determined to adhere to my instructions, and proceed by way of Cavetown, by which I might intercept the enemy should he pass through (Eiler's gap. In and around Emmettsburg we captured sixty or seventy prisoners of war, and some valuable hospital stores en route from Frederick to the army. The march was resumeearing up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad near Martinsburg. Parts of Jones' brigade were also engaged with the enemy, in spirited conflicts, not herein referred to, resulting very creditably to our arms, near Fairfield, Pennsylvania, and on the Cavetown road from Hagerstown — the Sixth and Seventh Virginia cavalry being particularly distinguished. Accounts of these will be found in the reports of Brigadier-General Jones and Colonel Baker. It soon became apparent that the enemy was moving up
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
on the road to Boonsboroa, while Johnson crossed to Sharpsburg, and Early moved to Shepherdstown to threaten Harper's Ferry. In these positions we waited for the other two corps to close up until the 21st of June, on the afternoon of which day I received orders from the General commanding to take Harrisburg, and next morning Rodes and Johnson moved towards Greencastle, Pa.; Jenkins reoccupied Chambersburg, from which he had fallen back some days before, and Early marched by Boonsboroa to Cavetown, where the Seventeenth Virginia cavalry (Colonel French) reported to him and remained with him till the battle of Gettysburg. Continuing our march, we reached Carlisle on the 27th, halting one day at Chambersburg to secure supplies. The marching was as rapid as the weather and the detours made by Major-General Early and Brigadier-General George H. Steuart would admit. Early, having marched parallel with us as far as Greenwood, there turned off towards Gettysburg and York. At Carlisl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. A. Early's report of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ounted for by the fact that we had no employes, but all teamsters, ambulance men, artificers, etc., etc. were enlisted soldiers. My division, notwithstanding the absence of three small regiments, was fully an average one in our army; and we had but nine in all of infantry. The Seventeenth Virginia cavalry, under Colonel Wm. H. French, of Jenkins's brigade, reported to me on this day, by order of General Ewell, and remained with me until the battle of Gettysburg. On the 23d I moved through Cavetown, Smithtown, and Ringgold (or Ridgeville, as it is most usually called) to Waynesboro in Pennsylvania. On the 24th I moved through Quincy and Altodale to Greenwood on the macadamised road from Chambersburg to Gettysburg. Rodes's and Johnson's divisions had preceded me across the Potomac, the former at Williamsport and the latter at Shepherdstown, taking the route through Hagerstown and Greencastle to Chambersburg. My route was along the western base of South Mountain, and the very excel
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
to reach the White House and disturb the deliberations of the Federal government. Rodes arrived on the 22d, and Johnson on the 23d, at Greencastle, whilst Jenkins, preceding them, entered Chambersburg, and Early, bearing to the right, occupied Cavetown at the foot of South Mountain. It was on this same day, the 23d, that Lee, being apprised of Pleasonton's retreat, issued marching orders to his other two army corps. Hill, crossing the Potomac first, reached Chambersburg on the 27th; LongstHarrisburg road. Ewell, having given one day's rest to his troops at Chambersburg, had resumed his march, with Johnson and Rodes, in the direction of this latter city; Early, on the other hand, after rounding the west side of the mountains from Cavetown to Greenwood, turned abruptly to the right to cross them and descend upon Gettysburg, so as to fill Stuart's place, whose absence we will soon explain. The section of country thus invaded by Ewell was one of the richest agricultural districts
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
ly starts in pursuit. Fearing lest Kilpatrick might overtake the great supply-train which is proceeding to Williamsport by way of Chambersburg, and has no other escort than Imboden's brigade in the Cumberland Valley, he directs his march toward Cavetown by way of the road which leads from Mechanicstown to Hagerstown. On reaching the culminating point of O'Eiler's Gap this road becomes divided, running in the direction of Leitersburg on the right and toward Smithsburg and Cavetown on the left. orges of Jack's Mountain. But a multitude of paths and a few roads would have enabled the Federals quickly to turn all the positions taken to bar their passage along the road: a portion of the army could have followed Stuart in the direction of Cavetown without encountering a single foot-soldier of the enemy; there would have been no necessity for the left column to be extended farther south than Turner's Gap, where the great turnpike would have afforded an easy passage for all the supply-train