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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 16 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 14 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 14 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 14 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. (search)
n the 15th of October the whole of our army moved back from the line passing through Fairfax Court-House to me, extending from Union Mills on the right, through Centreville, to Stone Bridge on the left. At the new position Van Dorn's division was on the right, with Ewell's brigade at Union Mills and mine on its left above that poi McClellan's, though the latter has estimated our force on the Potomac in the month of October at not less than 150,000. After the occupation of the line at Centreville, the infantry of our army at and near that place was organized into four divisions of three brigades each and two corps. Bonham's brigade was attached to Van Dber. These are the only conflicts of the Army of the Potomac with the enemy of any consequence, during the fall and winter, after the occupation of the line of Centreville. Our front was covered by a line of pickets some distance in front, extending from left to right, and all under command of Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart of
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 12: the affair at Groveton. (search)
been moved on the night of the 27th to the vicinity of the battlefield of the 21st of July, 1861, and A. P. Hill's to Centreville, with orders to Ewell to move up, by the northern bank of Bull Run, to the same locality with Taliaferro early on the ear where Jackson's division was already in position. Lawton's and Hays' brigades had by mistake taken the road to Centreville, but had now rejoined the rest of the division, and the whole of the brigades were placed under cover in the woods, north of the Warrenton Pike, through which the Sudley road ran. Hill's division came up from Centreville subsequently. In the meantime Pope's whole army had been moving by various roads upon Manassas Junction, with the expectation of finding Jackson's force there, but in the afternoon the corps of McDowell's en route for Manassas had been ordered to move to Centreville, and a portion of it marched along the Warrenton Pike. Very late in the afternoon, Jackson's division under Taliaferro was mo
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 13: second battle of Manassas. (search)
ace on the afternoon of the 28th, had retreated in the direction of Manassas, other troops had moved up to the vicinity, and early next morning it was discovered that Pope was moving his whole army against us from the direction of Manassas and Centreville, to which point it had gone in search of us. It now became necessary to change our front to meet the approaching columns, and Ewell's division, under the command of Brigadier General Lawton as senior brigadier, was formed in line facing Grwas moving on when I received an order to advance to the front from where I was, and in a few minutes afterwards another to move back by the right flank, as the report of the movement of the enemy around our left flank had proved untrue. I found that the other brigades of the division had bivouacked near where I had left them, and my own did the same. The enemy had been driven beyond Bull Run, and was in retreat to Centreville, our pursuit having been arrested by the approaching darkness.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. (search)
son's command, after having rested on the morning of the 31st, in the afternoon of that day was put in motion for the purpose of turning the enemy's position at Centreville. Crossing Bull Run at and near Sudley's Ford, it moved to the left over a country road, Jackson's division in front followed by Ewell's and Hill's bringing up in position, covering the retreat of his army, near Ox Hill, not far from Chantilly, and a short distance beyond which the Little River Pike, and the pike from Centreville to Fairfax Court-House, intersect. General Jackson at once put his troops in position on the ridge on the east of the Little River Pike, with his own divisin properly named, as Manassas Junction was then the headquarters and central position of our army, and was the objective point of the enemy during the battle. Such was not the case with either army at the last battle, and the Junction, several miles off, had no more relation to the battle than Bristow, Gainesville or Centreville.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 27: on the Rapidan. (search)
th we turned off in the direction of Fauquier Springs, and our advance drove a body of the enemy's cavalry from the river and crossed over, a portion of the troops, including my division, remaining on the south side. On the 13th we crossed and proceeded to Warrenton, and Meade's army, which was on the Rappahannock below, commenced its retreat on both sides of the railroad towards Manassas. We took position that night around Warrenton, Hill's corps being advanced out on the road towards Centreville. Stuart, with a part of his cavalry, had crossed the river and got in between two of the enemy's columns, where he spent the night of the 13th in imminent danger of capture. We moved before daybreak on the morning of the 14th, as well for the purpose of relieving Stuart as for attacking the enemy, Ewell's corps taking the road by Auburn towards Greenwich and Bristow Station, and Hill's, a route further to the left. About light, a considerable force of the enemy, composed of both inf
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
arpin Creek, 237 Catlett's Station, 110, 114 Catoctan Mountain, 386 Cavetown, 254 Cedar Creek, 242, 368, 369, 398, 406, 407, 417, 418, 430, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 447, 449, 450, 453, 456, 466, 475, 479 Cedar Creek Pike, 240, 242, 304, 424, 426 Cedar Runj 92, 93, 94, 96, 106, 154, 155 Cedarville, 241, 284, 453, 454 Cemetery Hill, 169, 222, 223, 224, 267, 268, 270, 271, 272, 273, 277, 278, 478 Central R. R., 261, 378, 359, 361, 369, 372, 457, 460, 461, 465 Centreville, 4, 5, 6, 7, 27, 31, 33, 35, 44, 50, 51, 52, 119, 122, 128, 129, 133, 304 Chaffin's Bluff, 76, 89 Chamberlain, Lieutenant, 172 Chambersburg, 254, 255, 263, 281, 401, 402, 404, 405, 477 Chambliss, General, 357 Chancellorsville, 167, 193, 197, 200, 201, 202, 208, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 231, 233, 235, 237, 475 Chantilly, 129 Charles City Court-House, 73 Charlestown, 136, 164, 240, 369, 406, 408, 409, 411, 413, 414, 419, 424 Charlottesville, 340, 341, 371, 3
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
ay, if we except a small skirmish by Jones. Ewell moved to the battlefield in the afternoon, but was not engaged. If these fresh troops had been led direct on Centreville by the roads crossing the fords they were guarding, they could easily have reached that point, four or five miles distant, before the fugitives of the Federal a part were returning by the circuitous route over which they marched in the morning, and which was the only road they knew. The six thousand Federal reserve at Centreville, under Miles, certainly, in view of the demoralization of the rest of the army, could not have made a successful resistance. Bonham and Longstreet crossed Bullrs. If the whole of the Southern cavalry had been ordered forward under an enterprising soldier like Stuart, supported by the troops that had not been engaged, Centreville might have easily been reached that night. The next day, while Stuart was moving in the direction of Alexandria and Washington, with some of the freshest infan
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
306 present for duty, including the force under Jackson in the valley and a small number under Holmes at Acquia Creek, and in March about 50,000. It is difficult to conceive why, with these immense odds in his favor, McClellan did not advance in the early spring against Johnston's position. This plan was discussed as well as two or three others. McClellan at last, it seems, told the Federal President in positive language that he did not approve the movement on Johnston's position at Centreville, but preferred to take his army down the Potomac River into Chesapeake Bay, up the Rappahannock River, and form a base of operations at a place called Urbana; or, better still, continue down Chesapeake Bay and around to Fort Monroe, using that formidable fort as a base, and advance on Richmond from that direction up the Peninsula formed by the James and York Rivers, upon whose surfaces the gunboats of his navy could be floated, and thus a thorough protection be given to his flanks. A sol
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 9: Second battle of Manassas. (search)
marching away from Manassas: A. P. Hill to Centreville, Ewell to the crossing of Bull Run at Black the Warrenton turnpike in the direction of Centreville, where they hoped to find him, and at the sle Pope was following his supposed route to Centreville, Jackson in his war paint was in line beyon Buckland, in getting the order to march to Centreville had to pass without knowing it in front of l he could get up Heintzelman and Reno from Centreville, and Porter, with King's division, from Bri badly defeated, and that night withdrew to Centreville, having lost, since he left the Rappahannoc 31st his army was posted on the heights of Centreville. Halleck telegraphed him on that day from pe had received decided General Lee to turn Centreville by moving to Pope's right and striking his this movement was perceived Pope abandoned Centreville. Hooker was immediately ordered to Fairfax positions. The very next day, however, at Centreville, he wires Halleck that his troops were in p[4 more...]
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
ry and some guns, lay perdue during the night within a mile or two of Meade's headquarters and some four hundred yards from General Warren's rear division, but dexterously extricated his whole command next morning. While Lee lay at Warrenton on the 13th, Meade was twenty miles south of Bristoe, but, in spite of his night march on the 12th, succeeded in placing his whole army beyond Lee on the 13th, except Warren, who stopped opposite him and only a few miles away. Meade fell back to Centreville and its vicinity, where he prepared to offer battle. The position might have been turned, as in the case of Pope, but the immense works around Washington held out hospitable arms in case Meade again declined the contest. Nothing was accomplished except to demonstrate that the army which first left Gettysburg first assumed the offensive in Virginia. When General Lee retired, Meade followed, and his advance cavalry, under Kilpatrick, was routed by Stuart wheeling about and attacking it
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