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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Hardeman Stuart: the young Captain of the signal corps. (search)
rought the tears to many eyes, albeit unused to the melting mood-and here my sketch might end. I will add, however, a somewhat curious incident which occurred a day or two after the battle. General Stuart followed the enemy on Sunday, and coming up with his rear at the bridge over Cub Run, had a slight artillery engagement, and took many prisoners. The bridge was destroyed and the cavalry turned to the left, and making a circuit came into the Little River turnpike, at the mouth of the Frying Pan road. Proceeding down the turnpike in the direction of Germantown, a squadron captured a company of the enemy's cavalry; and advancing further to a small tavern on the roadside, took prisoners another company who were feeding their horses in fancied security at the place. This cavalry formed a portion of that which had operated in the battles around Groveton; and in possession of one of the men was found Hardeman Stuart's coat, captured with his horse and accoutrements on the mountain
rought the tears to many eyes, albeit unused to the melting mood-and here my sketch might end. I will add, however, a somewhat curious incident which occurred a day or two after the battle. General Stuart followed the enemy on Sunday, and coming up with his rear at the bridge over Cub Run, had a slight artillery engagement, and took many prisoners. The bridge was destroyed and the cavalry turned to the left, and making a circuit came into the Little River turnpike, at the mouth of the Frying Pan road. Proceeding down the turnpike in the direction of Germantown, a squadron captured a company of the enemy's cavalry; and advancing further to a small tavern on the roadside, took prisoners another company who were feeding their horses in fancied security at the place. This cavalry formed a portion of that which had operated in the battles around Groveton; and in possession of one of the men was found Hardeman Stuart's coat, captured with his horse and accoutrements on the mountain
riumph over the Gum Spring road, we debouched into the Little River turnpike, and came past the Double Toll-gate to the Frying Pan road. Here the first picket halted me. But the Lieutenant of the picket took an intelligent view of things, and sufered me to continue the road to Centreville. Toward that place, accordingly, I proceeded, over the before-mentioned Frying Pan, which, like the Charles City road below Richmond, means anything you choose. Night had fully set in by the time I oroughly, and that this was the Warrenton road. Which way did you come? asked the Captain, suspiciously. By the Frying Pan road. I intended to take the short cut to the left of Centreville. You have come three or four miles out of the waythus to follow, as I have said, the very road I had travelled over when the first picket stopped me at the mouth of the Frying Pan. I had gone round two sides of a triangle and was quietly advancing as I might have done over the same route! Th
de his approach from the direction of Aldie. Proceeding down the Little River turnpike, the main route from the Court-House to the mountains, he reached a point within about three miles of Chantilly. Here, turning to the right, he crossed the Frying Pan road about half-way between Centreville and the turnpike, keeping in the woods, and leaving Centreville well to the right. He was now advancing in the triangle which is made by the Little River and Warrenton turnpikes and the Frying Pan road. Frying Pan road. Those who are familiar with the country there will easily understand the object of this proceeding. By thus cutting through the triangle, Captain Mosby avoided all pickets, scouting parties, and the enemy generally, who would only keep a lookout for intruders on the main roads. Advancing in this manner through the woods, pierced with devious and uncertain paths only, which the dense darkness scarcely enabled them to follow, the partisan and his little band finally struck into the Warrento
d then proceeding more to the left by Gainesville, he crossed the Catharpin and Tittle River, struck into the turnpike below Aldie, and proceeded to the rear of Frying Pan, where a regiment of infantry was encountered and attacked. Desultory skirmishing consumed some hours, when, having ascertained that the Sixth corps was encamp Buckland Races took place. General Kilpatrick came down from Bull Run, as furious as a wild boar at finding that the circumventing force which had appeared at Frying Pan was only a portion of Stuart's cavalry. He declared to a citizen, at whose house he stopped, that Stuart had been boasting of driving him from Culpeper, and noto say the least, at Auburn. They drove them across Bull Run, and took possession of the fords in front of Centreville. They penetrated to the enemy's rear at Frying Pan, and made them fall back from Centreville to Fairfax Court-House, and intrench, under the impression that the rebel army was in their rear. They got Kilpatrick
Doc. 9.-General Stahel's reconnoissance. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Sackett. headquarters Ninth New-York cavalry, Centreville, Va., October 19, 1862. Brigadier-General Stahel, Commanding First Division Eleventh Army Corps: sir: In accordance with orders received from headquarters First division at ten o'clock A. M., October fifteenth, I marched to Chantilly, and sent a patrol under Capt. Ayres through Frying Pan toward Leesburgh. I then advanced with my main force on Little River turnpike to Green Springs Cross-Roads, and sent Captain Hanley to Aldie to join the picket who had sent for reenforcements. As per order, I remained here in command of the Ninth New-York and First New-Jersey cavalry until the morning of the sixteenth instant. At one o'clock A. M., Captain Ayres returned with his detachment, having patrolled the country thoroughly to within three miles of Leesburgh, but found nothing of the enemy. About nine o'clock on the morning of the sixteenth instant, I
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. (search)
sight of the sentinels of a camp, the dimensions of which could not be seen. The artillery was placed in position just after dark, and opened upon the road. A few rounds sufficed to throw everything into confusion; and such commotion, upsetting, collisions and smashups were rarely ever seen. The firing continued as long as it seemed desirable, and the pieces and the command withdrew to camp for the night, two miles north of the Oxhill, on that road. Next morning, I returned by way of Frying Pan to connect with General Jackson, and inform him of the enemy as far as ascertained. The head of his column was opposite Chantilly, and I disposed part of Robertson's brigade on his right flank between him and Centreville, and reconnoitred in person, but no force but a small one of cavalry was discernible nearer than Centreville. Oxhill was held by my cavalry till General Jackson came up, and having charged General Robertson with the care of the right flank, I first tried to force, with
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1862 (search)
g. 31: Skirmish, GermantownMAINE--1st Cavalry. NEW JERSEY--1st Cavalry. NEW YORK--2d Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--1st Cavalry. RHODE ISLAND--1st Cavalry. Aug. 31: Skirmish, FranklinPENNSYLVANIA--11th Cavalry. Aug. 31: Reconnoissance to Dranesville, Frying Pan and Herndon StationNEW YORK--10th Cavalry. Sept. 1: Engagement, Chantilly, Ox HillDELAWARE--3d Infantry. INDIANA--20th Infantry. MAINE--6th Battery Light Arty.; 3d and 4th Infantry. MARYLAND--1st Cavalry; 2d Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--11th, 12thoss, 20 wounded, 100 missing. Total, 120. Dec. 28: Skirmishes near Suffolk and at Providence ChurchNEW YORK--130th Infantry. Dec. 28: Skirmish, DumfriesMAINE--1st Cavalry. Dec. 28: Skirmish, AnnandaleVERMONT--1st Cavalry. Dec. 29: Skirmish, Frying Pan, near ChantillyPENNSYLVANIA--2d and 17th Cavalry. Dec. 29: Skirmish, OccoquanPENNSYLVANIA--2d Cavalry. Dec. 30-31: Expedition from Potomac Creek to Richard's and Ellis Fords, Rappahannock RiverMAINE--2d and 20th Infantry. MICHIGAN--1st, 4th a
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1863 (search)
avalry. VERMONT--1st Cavalry (Detachments). May 31: Skirmish, WarrentonVERMONT--1st Cavalry. June 1: Skirmish, Snicker's GapNEW YORK--5th Cavalry. June 2: Skirmish, UppervilleINDIANA--3d Cavalry. June 3: Skirmish, FayettevilleMASSACHUSETTS--1st Cavalry (Detachment). June 3: Skirmish near Strasburg(No Reports.) June 3-Aug. 1: Campaign, Gettysburg(See Pennsylvania.) June 4: Skirmish on Lawyer's Road, near Fairfax Court HouseNEW YORK--11th Cavalry (Cos. "B" and "C"). June 4: Skirmish, Frying PanNEW YORK--5th Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 3 killed, 7 wounded, 7 missing. Total, 17. June 4-5: Expedition from Yorktown to Walkerton and Aylett'sDELAWARE--4th Infantry (Detachment). NEW YORK--168th Infantry (Detachment). PENNSYLVANIA--169th and 174th Infantry (Detachments). U. S. Gunboats. June 5: Skirmish, WalkertonNEW YORK--168th Infantry (Detachment). June 5-7: Reconnoissance through Gates Co., N. C and down Chowan RiverPENNSYLVANIA--11th Cavalry (5 Cos.). June 5-13: Skirmishes
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
, 1863. 1st Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac and Middle Military Division, to June, 1865. Service. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till June, 1863. Scout from Centreville to Falmouth, Va., February 27-28, 1863. Hauxhurst Mills April 13. On Lawyer's Road, near Fairfax Court House and Frying Pan, June 4. Ordered to join Army of the Potomac in the field June 25. Reconnoissance up the Catoctin Valley June 27-28. Occupation of Gettysburg, Pa., June 28. Action at Hanover, Pa., June 30. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Hunterstown July 2. Monterey July 4. Smithburg July 5. Williamsport and Hagerstown July 6. Boonsboro July 8. Hagerstown July 11-13. Falling Waters July 14. Williamsport July 14. Snicker's Gap July 17. Ashby's Gap July 17,
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