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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 14 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 12 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 6 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 6 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for Franklin, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Franklin, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
esired to connect themselves with a single Church in North Carolina, and upon inquiry he found that that Church had recently enjoyed a precious season of revival. Thus it operates—the prayer of the soldier for his loved ones at home is heard, and the prayer for the absent soldier boy is not unheeded. But I must close, as I fear I'll make your readers rejoice that my lengthy communications are only occasional. Rev. W. N. Chaudoin reports that during a recent visit to our forces at Franklin, Virginia, he baptized eight persons. Up to the time of his leaving there were nearly fifty professions of conversion. Rev. J. L. Truman says: I spent the greater part of September in protracted meetings, in concert with other ministers. These meetings were attended with great good. At one there were 140 converts, and seventy were baptized. There were converts in all of these meetings. A religious feeling of no ordinary character now prevails in the Army of Northern Virginia. We hav