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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 3 3 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
the Western and Atlantic Railroad, four and a half miles from Kingston. May 19.-The command marched through Kingston to a bridge on the Etowah River, four miles southwest of the town. May 20.-The brigade moved at 8 a. m. to a point on the Western and Atlantic Railroad near Cassville, where it went into camp about noon. At this place the command stopped three days for the purpose of drawing shoes and clothing. May 23.-The command marched at 8 a. m., crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford, and encamped for the night on Euharlee Creek near the Burnt Hickory road. May 24.-The brigade moved out on the Burnt Hickory road; crossing Raccoon Creek, it bivouacked for the night on the south side. May 25.-The brigade remained at this place during the day, while the train of the Twentieth Army Corps passed, and at 1 o'clock next morning, May 26, it marched on the Burnt Hickory road, through Burnt Hickory, to Brown's Mill, three miles from Dallas. May 27.-The command moved
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
rning of the 17th started with the rest of the army in pursuit, passing through Adairsville and Calhoun on the 18th, Kingston on the 19th, and to a point near Cass Station on the 20th, where we remained till the 24th. At this point all the regimental wagons were taken, by order of the division commander, which will account for the subsequent delay in reports, all company and regimental papers and desks being left behind. The brigade again moved on the 24th, crossing the Etowah River at Island Ford, passing Burnt Hickory, and reaching Pickett's Mills, or New Hope, on the evening of the 26th. Here the brigade was put in line of battle as a support to a part of the Fourth Corps, and at night threw up works covering their whole front. The brigade remained in this position from the 27th of May till the 5th day of June, under fire all the time. Incessant vigilance and resolute determination were all the time necessary to hold the position. The enemy kept up during these days a contin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 110 (search)
he command marched on the 17th, crossing the Connesauga River, and camped twelve miles from Resaca; on the 18th eight miles to Adairsville. I should have mentioned that Lieut. E. N. Wilcox was compelled to return to Chattanooga for medical treatment. Lieut. W. H. Bisbee joined at Resaca. On the 19th through Kingston to Etowah bridge. On the 20th to Cass Station, where a rest took place until the 23d, all baggage of officers being sent to the rear. On the 24th crossed Etowah River at Island Ford; 26th, to Burnt Hickory, and in the evening to Pickett's Mills, where the night was spent in intrenching. From the 27th of May to the 5th day of June the command was constantly engaged in watching and fighting. Many lives were lost and the duty in the trenches was very severe, and the enemy's fire constant and murderous. The conduct of Captain Fetterman, in command of his battalion, in throwing up a salient and maintaining his position against repeated attempts to dislodge him by the e
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 117 (search)
e second line of the Third Brigade, on the right of the division. Here the regiment remained under the fire of the enemy, protected by earth-works, until May 16, when the enemy having fled the previous night, the regiment started in pursuit. The pursuit was continued until May 21, 1864, during which and the following day, May 22, 1864, the regiment laid in camp making preparations for a farther advance. On the morning of May 23 the regiment again broke camp, crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford, and camped on Euharlee Creek. The march continued until May 26, 1864, on which day the regiment reached the vicinity of the enemy and formed line of battle. On May 27 the regiment moved to the extreme left to support the Fourth Corps, and about 5 p. m. were ordered into action on the extreme left of the line, the left of the regiment resting on Pumpkin Vine Creek, and the right on the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. Upon taking this position, I sent Maj. T. V. Kimble to the br
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 119 (search)
ith the brigade, driving the enemy's skirmishers and occupying an advanced position under a heavy fire of artillery, losing in this advance and position 2 enlisted men killed, 3 officers and 11 enlisted men wounded. May 12, marched from Buzzard Roost, passing through Snake Creek Gap, and participating with the brigade in the advance on Resaca, May 14 and 15, without loss. May 16, commenced pursuit of the enemy, passing through Calhoun, Adairsville, and Kingston, crossing Etowah River at Island Ford, May 23, taking position, May 26, in front of enemy's works near Dallas. May 27, moved with brigade and division, supporting General Wood's division, Fourth Army Corps, passing to the front and left, striking the enemy on Little Pumpkin Vine Creek, the brigade advancing on the left of said division; the Thirty-eighth, with First Wisconsin Infantry, was ordered to the left flank to occupy and hold a hill of some importance, which was done, driving the enemy's skirmishers and cavalry fr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
h Ohio Regiment, of the Second Brigade, whose term of service had expired, went North for the purpose of being mustered out. At the same time the Twenty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteers from the First Brigade, and the Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers from the Third Brigade, were detached and left in garrison at Kingston. The Twenty-fourth Illinois never afterward rejoined the command, as its term of service soon expired. May 23, my division again marched, and, crossing the Etowah at Island Ford, encamped on Euharlee Creek. From this time until the end of the month we remained in rear guarding or escorting trains, generally not far from Burnt Hickory. June 1, leaving the First Brigade in charge of the trains at Burnt Hickory, I marched to the front with the other two and joined the main army, then going into position on the line running northerly from Dallas toward Acworth, east of Pumpkin Vine Creek. June 2, having relieved a portion of the First Division, Fourteenth Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
h Ohio Regiment, of the Second Brigade, whose term of service had expired, went North for the purpose of being mustered out. At the same time the Twenty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteers from the First Brigade, and the Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers from the Third Brigade, were detached and left in garrison at Kingston. The Twenty-fourth Illinois never afterward rejoined the command, as its term of service soon expired. May 23, my division again marched, and, crossing the Etowah at Island Ford, encamped on Euharlee Creek. From this time until the end of the month we remained in rear guarding or escorting trains, generally not far from Burnt Hickory. June 1, leaving the First Brigade in charge of the trains at Burnt Hickory, I marched to the front with the other two and joined the main army, then going into position on the line running northerly from Dallas toward Acworth, east of Pumpkin Vine Creek. June 2, having relieved a portion of the First Division, Fourteenth Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
m the brigade and ordered to garrison Resaca. On the 17th the brigade moved through Calhoun to a point three miles north of Adairsville. On the 18th the brigade moved, and encamped for the night four miles north of Kingston. On the 19th marched nine miles, and encamped on the railroad five miles south of Kingston. 20th, 21st, and 22d, remained in camp. On the 22d the Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry was detached for garrison duty at Kingston. On the 23d crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford and encamped on Euharlee Creek, three miles from Euharlee. On the 24th moved one mile on the Dallas road and returned to camp. 2Sth, remained in camp. 26th, moved to Raccoon Ford, four miles from Burnt Hickory; ordered to return to Kingston to escort a supply train. Returned to Gillem's Bridge and encamped; threw out strong picket guards. Early the following morning sent three regiments to bring up trains from Kingston to the bridge; marched with the whole command to Raccoon Ford, on
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 176 (search)
of artillery and musketry, and was heavily engaged here all day. 16th, the enemy having evacuated the night before, I moved into Resaca and camped. 17th, moved forward again, passing through Calhoun, and camped at the battle-ground five miles below. 18th, moved forward, passing through Adairsville, and camped at a point five miles from Kingston. 19th, moved again to a position on the banks of the Coosa River. 20th, marched on toward Cassville and camped. 21st, crossed Etowah River at Island Ford, and camped on Euharlee Creek. 22d, remained in camp. 23d, remained in camp. 24th, crossed creek and camped on Allatoona Hills. 25th, marched at 2 a. m. toward Dallas, through Burnt Hickory, and camped on the mountain. 26th, moved forward and took up position in line on Pumpkin Vine Creek at 4 p. m., and threw up works during the night. 27th, engaged by rebel batteries all day. 28th, engaged in same position all day. 29th, engaged at same place all day. 30th, engaged all day. 31st, en
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 178 (search)
vision several miles to the right, and one section relieved two guns of some Iowa battery, and fired several shots at the rebel works, but elicited no reply. On the 16th marched and crossed the Coosa River at Resaca at midnight, and parked for the men to breakfast while the division was coming up; passed through Calhoun and camped for the night three miles south. On the 19th camped near Cassville, where we remained until the 23d, when we took up the route of march, fording the Etowah at Island Ford, and after ten miles' march, camped on Island Creek; two days passed without a move. Marched to Burnt Hickory Valley on the 26th. At noon on the 28th moved four miles to the front, returning the next day to Burnt Hickory. June 1, reporting Lieutenant Repp's section to General Turchin, who remained as train guard, marched ten miles to the front. June 3, advanced the battery to the line of Colonel Este's brigade, and during this and the succeeding day kept up a desultory fire on the reb
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