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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 44 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 42 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 35 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Leesburg (Virginia, United States) or search for Leesburg (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
seemed to have come. The rigors of winter in Virginia hardly make themselves felt before the beginning of December. By the 17th of October the enemy had again retreated. The Army of the Potomac replied with a commensurate advance. But this was a faux pas. The blunder was consummated at Ball's Bluff [see p. 122]. McClellan's orders had been given in entire ignorance of the topography of the environs of Edwards's Ferry (all the maps being inexact) and of the force of the enemy in front of Leesburg. In fact, at that time the organization of the secret service was entirely insufficient to the occasion, in spite of the praiseworthy efforts of Mr. Allen Pinkerton. Usually mentioned in the Official Records under the assumed name of E. J. Allen.--Editors. McClellan, who was established beyond Dranesville with McCall's division, believed himself to be within supporting distance of Baker's brigade. The latter was crushed on the 21st, before any one on the right bank of the Potomac knew
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ball's Bluff and the arrest of General Stone. (search)
f the Upper Potomac. him to keep a good lookout on Leesburg to see if the operations of McCall should have theybreak we pushed forward our reconnoissance toward Leesburg to the distance of about a mile from the river, tohe slope and along the other line of it, observing Leesburg, which was in full view, and the country about it,may do so as far as to have a strong position near Leesburg, if you can keep them before you, avoiding their batteries. If they pass Leesburg and take the Gun Spring road you will not follow far, but seize the first gooter having advanced for a mile in the direction of Leesburg, had been attacked and fallen back to the position not a word of censure. He even telegraphed, Take Leesburg. Curiously enough, this dispatch, being in cipher.--R. B. I. in regard to dislodging the enemy from Leesburg, that the scouting parties found no large force ofrefugee came into General W. W. Burns's lines from Leesburg, with a vague and utterly groundless story of myst
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on Crampton's Gap and Antietam. (search)
ed in the Official Records, Vol. XIX., Pt. II., p. 253, the sentence reads: If the main force of the enemy is in your front, more troops can be spared from here.--Editors. Sept. 13.--I am of opinion that the enemy will send a small column toward Pennsylvania, so as to draw your forces in that direction; then suddenly move on Washington with the forces south of the Potomac, and those he may cross over. Sept. 14.--Scouts report a large force still on Virginia side of the Potomac, near Leesburg. If so, I fear you are exposing your left flank, and that the enemy can cross in your rear. Sept. 16.--I fear now more than ever that they [the enemy] will recross at Harper's Ferry, or below, and turn your left, thus cutting you off from Washington. . . . On September 12th, Mr. Lincoln telegraphed General McClellan that he believed the enemy was recrossing the Potomac, and said, Please do not let him get off without being hurt. These dispatches demonstrate that it was McClellan'
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.68 (search)
eld of Bull Run we found it strewn with the still unburied dead of Pope's army, and learned that Lee was pushing for the fords of the Upper Potomac. Following him rapidly, on the night of the 6th of September my division reached the vicinity of Leesburg, and the next morning crossed the Potomac at Cheek's Ford, at the mouth of the Monocacy, and about three miles above White's Ford, where Stonewall Jackson had crossed. At Cheek's Ford I overtook G. B. Anderson's brigade of D. H. Hill's divisiprisoner, I professed ignorance of General Lee's whereabouts and advised her to remain quietly at the hotel, as I should, no doubt, have some information for her the next morning. Before resuming our march the next day I sent her under guard to Leesburg, directing the provost marshal at that place to hold her for three or four days and then release her. Resuming the march at daylight on the 13th, we reached the foot of Loudoun Heights about 10 o'clock. Here I was joined by a detachment of si