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An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 10 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 9 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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forty miles; the land route was about thirty-five miles, with two or three very small towns in the valleys-among them Lovettsville, on the south bank, and but four miles from the Ferry. A body of the enemy were reported to be in possession of this f the stream, with more animosity, however, than decided effect. The enemy was still on our side of the Potomac at Lovettsville, and it was determined first to entice them into the interior, and then surround them, if possible. Scouts came in da the enemy, but we were sorry to learn that the inhabitants of the surrounding country patronized them. The people of Lovettsville and Waterford were chiefly Pennsylvania Quakers, who had of late years settled there, and although their creed forbadens summoned his brigade, and leaving camps standing, to deceive the telegraph at the Sugar Loaf, sallied forth towards Lovettsville long before day. When the sun rose over Maryland, we had just halted on a lofty hill and lay in the woods. The scener
e a total of ten thousand, but certainly not more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, from Point of Rocks; eastward, from Edwards's Ferry; and our rear from Drainsville. It was thought by some that our movement would be directly westward into the Shenandoah, to Jackson, distant thirty miles; but a heavy force of the enemy was between that point and our present position, and were tightening the lines around us every day. An column had sought the Blue Ridge, and were passing south-westward, evidently intending to flank and get in the rear of J
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 17: the campaign in Maryland. (search)
e trains of the army. General McLaws, with his own division, and that of General R. H. Anderson, will follow General Longstreet; on reaching Middletown he will take the route to Harper's Ferry, and by Friday morning possess himself of the Maryland Heights, and endeavor to capture the enemy at Harper's Ferry and its vicinity. General Walker, with his division, after accomplishing the object in which he is now engaged, will cross the Potomac at Cheek's Ford, ascend its right bank to Lovettsville, take possession of Loudoun Heights, if practicable, by Friday morning; Key's Ford on his left, and the road between the end of the mountain and the. Potomac on his right. He will, as far as practicable, co-operate with General McLaws and General Jackson in intercepting the retreat of the enemy. General D. H. Hill's division will form the rear-guard of the army, pursuing the road taken by the main body. The reserve artillery, ordnance, and supply-trains, &c., will precede General H
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
ggage trains of the army. General McLaws, with his own division and that of General R. H. Anderson, will follow General Longstreet. On reaching Middletown he will take the route to Harper's Ferry, and by Friday morning possess himself of the Maryland Heights, and endeavor to capture the enemy at Harper's Ferry and vicinity. General Walker, with his division, after accomplishing the object in which he is now engaged, will cross the Potomac at Cheek's Ford, ascend its right bank to Lovettsville, take possession of Loudoun Heights, if practicable, by Friday morning, Key's Ford on his left, and the road between the end of the mountain and the Potomac on his right. He will, as far as practicable, co-operate with General McLaws and General Jackson in intercepting the retreat of the enemy. General D. H. Hill's division will form the rear-guard of the army, pursuing the road taken by the main body. The reserve artillery, ordnance, supply-trains, etc., will precede General Hill.
Nineteenth Ohio on the Monarch and Hastings. Both regiments were in fine condition, and fully equipped.--Ohio Statesman, November 19. An expedition left Paducah, Ky., to-night, in the direction of Columbus. It was composed of the Fortieth and Forty-first Illinois regiments, a section of Buell's artillery-three guns, and two companies of cavalry, under command of General Paine. Information had been received that fifteen or eighteen hundred secesh, commanded by H. Clay King, were at Lovettsville, sixteen miles distant, on the road to Columbus. There is a large flouring mill there, and it was the design of General Paine to rout the rebels and take possession of the mill. No enemy was found, however, and General Paine confiscated the flour, and took some of the machinery of the mill to prevent its being of any use to the rebels, and returned to Paducah.--Louisville Journal, November 23. Flour, in Vicksburg, Mississippi, is held at twenty dollars per barrel. The Vicksburg Su
wenty — seven gentlemen and four ladies from Boston; twenty-one gentlemen and seven ladies from New York, and Miss Susan Walker, Mrs. Walter R. Johnson, and Miss Mary Donalson, from Washington and Philadelphia, subscribed to the oath. No man who would not, in case of necessity, fight for his country was permitted to go to Port Royal to assist in the management of the contrabands.--(Doc. 74.) Four regiments of rebels, with a four-gun battery, attempted to flank Colonel Geary, near Lovettsville, Va., but were driven off without a skirmish. An engagement took place between the National forces, under command of Gen. Pope, and the rebels, about two miles north of New Madrid, Mo. After a fight of between two and three hours, the National forces retired a short distance, having met with a slight loss from the fire of the rebel gunboats.--(Doc. 75.) -an order, dated at St. Louis, Mo., was issued to-day by Maj.-Gen. Halleck, U. S.A., establishing regulations for the conduct of
n, one Georgia, and one Mississippi regiment, and the Hampton Legion, formerly encamped back of and below Occoquan, Va., evacuated that place, destroying everything they could not carry on their backs. The National troops took possession, and were welcomed by a part of the inhabitants with great joy. Every boat in the vicinity, and anything that would float, was destroyed. The rebels told the villagers they were going to fall back to the Rappahannock. Last night, Col. Geary left Lovettsville, Va., with his whole command, and marched through Wheatland and Waterford, taking prisoners at both places, and putting the scattered forces of the rebels to flight. Shortly after sunrise, this morning, he took possession of Fort Johnston at Leesburg, which was christened by the officers Fort Geary. He then entered the town, with flags flying and bayonets fixed. The rebel troops, who had thought this one of their greatest strongholds, could be discerned through a glass retreating. Gen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The invasion of Maryland. (search)
nd baggage trains of the army. General McLaws, with his own division and that of General R. H. Anderson, will follow General Longstreet; on reaching Middletown he will take the route to Harper's Ferry, and by Friday morning possess himself of the Maryland Heights and endeavor to capture the enemy at Harper's Ferry and vicinity. General Walker, with his division after accomplishing the object in which he is now engaged, will cross the Potomac at Check's ford, ascend its right bank to Lovettsville, take possession of Loudoun Heights, if practicable, by Friday morning, Keyes's ford on his left, and the road between the end of the mountain and the Potomac on his right. He will, as far as practicable, cooperate with General McLaws and General Jackson in intercepting the retreat of the enemy. General D. H. Hill's division will form the rear-guard of the army, pursuing the road taken by the main body. The reserve artillery, ordnance, and supply trains, etc., will precede General Hi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
ween the pickets and the outposts of the confronting contestants. On the 5th of August, a detachment of the Twenty-eighth New York, under Captain Brush, mostly firemen, attacked a squad of Confederate cavalry in Virginia, opposite the Point of Rocks, killing and wounding eight men, and capturing nine prisoners and twenty horses; and on the, 12th a detachment of the Tenth New York, under Captain Kennedy, crossed the Potomac from Sandy Hook, and attacked and routed some Virginia cavalry at Lovettsville. On the 12th of September, 1861. reconnoissance was made toward Lewinsville, four or five miles from Camp Advance, at the Chain Bridge, by about two thousand men, under the command of General William F. Smith, These troops consisted of the Seventy-ninth (Highlanders) New York Militia; battalions of Vermont and Indiana Volunteers, and of the First United States Chasseurs; a Cavalry company, and Griffin's West Point Battery. in charge of a brigade at that post. They had accomplished
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
nandoah Valley. That leader crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry on the day when Lee passed over above, and, pushing on to Shepherdstown, he there encountered, fought and beat Confederate cavalry under Fitzhugh Lee, each party being dismounted, on account of the ground being rough and wooded, and each losing about one one hundred men. David McM. Gregg. On the 17th and 18th of July, Meade's army crossed the Potomac, chiefly at and near Berlin, and moved rapidly southward by way of Lovettsville, Union, Upperville, and Warrenton, seizing the gaps of the Blue Ridge on its way. Its route was that which it had followed northward under Hooker a few weeks before. It reached Warrenton on the 25th of July, after a detention at Manassas Gap, where Meade had been led to expect an engagement of the two armies in large force. At that time Meade had the start of Lee in the race toward Richmond, the latter having halted at Bunker's Hill and endeavored to recall or distract his antagonist by
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