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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., General Pegram on the night before his death. (search)
iring; was now at Kirby's, and soon would be at Dinwiddie Court-House. This was not eminently agreeable to myself personally. Kirby's was on the only road to Petersburg, except by way of Malone's — for the time rendered impracticable-and to reach my journey's end it seemed necessary to make the circuit by Dinwiddie Court-House. To attempt the road by Kirby's was certain capture; and in an undoubted bad humour the solitary horseman, as Mr. James would say, turned to the left, crossed Stony Creek, struck into the Flat foot road, and in due time drew near Roney's bridge, on the upper waters of the stream, near Dinwiddie. Within a quarter of a mile of the stream a soldier made his appearance, coming to meet me, and this individual informed me with the politest possible salute that I had better look out, as the Yankees were at the bridge. At the bridge! Where? At Roney's bridge, just in front, sir. This was the unkindest cut of all. I had made a wearisome circuit, reached
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 48: battle of Cedar Creek, or Belle Grove. (search)
order on the Back Road, was ordered to that point with his cavalry. The infantry moved back towards New Market at three o'clock next morning, and Rosser was left at Fisher's Hill to cover the retreat of the troops, and hold that position until they were beyond pursuit. He remained at Fisher's Hill until after ten o'clock on the 20th, and the enemy did not advance to that place while he was there. He then fell back without molestation to his former position, and established his line on Stony Creek, across from Columbia Furnace to Edinburg, seven miles below Mount Jackson. My other troops were halted at New Market, about seven miles from Mount Jackson, and there was an entirely open country between the two places, they being very nearly in sight of each other. Lomax had moved, on the day of the battle, on the Front Royal road towards Winchester, under the impression that the enemy was being forced back towards that place, and he did not reach me. When he ascertained the reverse
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
-21, 129- 131, 140-42-43 Staunton, 251, 253, 285, 326, 328-29, 331, 340, 359, 368, 369-372, 375, 379, 381-82, 434-35, 457-58, 461, 462-63 St. James Church, 106 St. James College, 402 Stephenson's Depot, 250-51, 397, 399, 410-414, 419, 420-21, 424 Stevens, General (U. S. A.), 131 Stevens, Thaddeus, 255, 256 Stevensburg, 106 Stewart, General G. H., 372 Stone Bridge, 5, 16, 26-28, 31-32, 35, 50, 119, 164, 165 Stone Tavern, 26, 29 Stonewall Brigade, 163, 237, 322 Stony Creek, 450 Stop-Cock, 184 Strasburg, 165, 326, 331, 333, 366, 368-69, 397-98-99, 406-07, 437, 440-41-42, 449 Strong, Colonel, 126, 130 Stuart, General J. E. B., 13, 22-23, 25-26, 33, 36, 38, 52, 66 68, 76, 101, 105-06, 110, 114-15, 118, 132, 141, 144 148, 156, 164, 171, 176, 180, 192, 196, 213-16, 273, 285, 302-03-04 Sturgis, General (U. S. A.), 131 Sudley, 22, 29, 32, 119, 129 Summit Point, 408-09-10, 412-414 Sumner, General (U. S. A.), 132, 148- 149, 151, 158-59, 180,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 39 (search)
hat a cavalry raid from the north may dash into the city and burn the bridges on the James; then our army would be in a fix. I have expressed this apprehension to the Secretary, and asked him to arm the old men, for the defense of the bridges, public buildings, etc. He awaits events. Mr. Hunter and other public characters are looking very grave. The following dispatch was received to-day from Weldon, via Raleigh and Greensborough, N. C.: May 8th. The enemy destroyed the wire from Stony Creek to within three miles of Belfield, a distance of about fifteen miles. Our men and employees are repairing it, and we hope to have communication reopened to-morrow. W. S. Harris. Col. Preston, Superintendent of Bureau of Conscription, has written another letter to the Secretary, urging the promotion of Captain C. B. Duffield, who threatens to leave him for a position with Gen. Kumper, at Lynchburg, where he can live cheaper. IIe says he has urged the President, to no avail. The
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 46 (search)
ngress, calling for a convention of the States-or appointment of commissioners from the States. Voted down by a large majority. Gen. Rosser (two brigades) made a descent, a few days ago, on the Battimore and Ohio Railroad, capturing some nine guns altogether, including four siege, which he spiked. The others he brought off, with 800 prisoners. He destroyed 200 wagons and a large amount of quartermaster and ordnance stores. Per contra. Grant has pounced upon one of our depots at Stony Creek, Weldon Railroad, getting some 80 prisoners, and destroying a few stores. It is said he still holds the position — of some importance. Gen. Ewell still thinks the aspect here is threatening. Brig.-Gen. Chilton, Inspector-General, has ordered investigations of the fortunes of bonded officers, who have become rich during the war. A strong effort has been made to have Gen. Ripley removed from Charleston. He is a Northern man, and said to be dissipated. Senator Orr opposes the c
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ichmond. General Kautz, with 3,000 cavalry from Suffolk, on the same day with our movement up James River, forced the Blackwater, burned the railroad bridge at Stony Creek, below Petersburg, cutting in two Beauregard's force at that point. We have landed here, intrenched ourselves, destroyed many miles of railroad, and got a posion from which he could not dislodge him. He then commenced his return march, and on the 28th met the enemy's cavalry in force at the Weldon railroad crossing of Stony Creek, where he had a severe but not decisive engagement. Thence he made a detour from his left, with a view of reaching Reams' Station, supposing it to be in our p time by the Weldon road and the Jerusalem plank road, turning west from the latter before crossing the Nottoway, and west with the whole column before reaching Stony Creek. General Sheridan will then move independently, under other instructions which will be given him. All dismounted cavalry belonging to the Army of the Potomac, a
st.) by the Weldon road and the Jerusalem plank-road, turning west from the latter before crossing the Nottoway, and west with the whole column before reaching Stony Creek. General Sheridan will then move independently under other instructions which will be given him. All dismounted cavalry belonging to the Army of the Potomac, anal Lee. He met it by extending the right of his infantry on the White Oak road, while drawing in the cavalry of W. H. F. Lee and Rosser along the south bank of Stony Creek to cover a crossroads called Five Forks, to anticipate me there; for assuming that my command was moving in conjunction with the infantry, with the ultimate puraining Smith's near Dinwiddie, for use in any direction required. On the 29th W. H. F. Lee conformed the march of his cavalry with that of ours, but my holding Stony Creek in this way forced him to make a detour west of Chamberlin's Run, in order to get in communication with his friends at Five Forks. The rain that had been fa
about two miles in front of Dinwiddie, near J. Boisseau's. Crook, with Smith and Gregg's brigades, continued to cover Stony Creek, and Custer was still back at Rowanty Creek, trying to get the trains up. This force had been counted while crossing tg him along the road, while Custer extended on the left over toward Chamberlain's Run, Crook being held in watch along Stony Creek, meanwhile, to be utilized as circumstances might require when Warren attacked. The order of General Meade to Warrught along the Five Forks road to Dr. Smith's, and Crook's division was directed to continue watching the crossings of Stony Creek and Chamberlain's Run. That we had accomplished nothing but to oblige our foe to retreat was to me bitterly disapp Run, Merritt going into camp on the widow Gillian's plantation. As I had been obliged to keep Crook's division along Stony Creek throughout the day, it had taken no active part in the battle. Years after the war, in 1879, a Court of Inquiry wa
The United States Senate passed the House resolution — ayes thirty-two, nays ten--suggested by the President, declaring that the United States ought to cooperate, by giving pecuniary aid, with any State which may adopt the gradual abolition of slavery.--The bill for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia was discussed, but no vote taken. A party of Colonel Ashby's rebel scouts made their appearance early this morning on the high wooded ridge on the opposite side of Stony Creek, near Edenburg, Va. They were fired on by some of the Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania, when Ashby unmasked four guns and threw several shells into the Union camp. The rebels subsequently retreated.--Baltimore American, April 3. Cavalry pickets of Gen. Lew. Wallace's division, at Crump's Landing, on the Tennessee River, were driven in this evening. A sharp skirmish occurred, in which company I, Fifth Ohio cavalry, lost three men, taken prisoners, namely, Sergeant E. F. Cook and privates W
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
May 9th, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Our operations may be summed up in a few words. With 1700 cavalry we have advanced up the Peninsula, forced the Chickahominy, and have safely brought them to their present position. These were colored cavalry, and are now holding our advance pickets toward Richmond. General Kautz, with three thousand cavalry from Suffolk, on the same day with our movement up the James River, forced the Black Water, burned the railroad bridge at Stony Creek, below Petersburg, cutting into Beauregard's force at that point. We have landed here, intrenched ourselves, destroyed many miles of railroad, and got a position which, with proper supplies, we can hold out against the whole of Lee's army. I have ordered up the supplies. Beauregard, with a large portion of his force, was left south by the cutting of the railroads by Kautz. That portion which reached Petersburg under Hill I have whipped to-day, killing and wounding many, and takin
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