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uarters in Staunton, placed his artillery in a camp near Waynesboro, cantoned Wharton's infantry near Fishersville, and widellery, under Col. Thomas L. Carter, left the vicinity of Waynesboro and went to Richmond. On the 7th snow fell to the depth east at 4:30 p. m., just after Early and his staff left Waynesboro, where the army had been ordered to concentrate. The enpike. The mud was particularly deep between Staunton and Waynesboro, making it very difficult to move trains and artillery. nts. Early's wagon train encamped beyond South river at Waynesboro, in the entrance to Rockfish gap. On the 2d of March, Wharton's division reached Waynesboro at an early hour, and was put in line of battle, his whole force being only about 800ce and formed in line of battle about a mile in front of Waynesboro, across and at right angles to the Staunton road, with smany of the latter stuck in the mud between Staunton and Waynesboro. On the 4th, Rosser, having collected a portion of hi
unfaltering courage that elicited the unbounded praise of the lieutenant-general commanding. General Long was with the Shenandoah army at the final disaster at Waynesboro and afterward accompanied Gordon's corps in the withdrawal from Richmond, participated in its engagements in April, 1865, and finally was surrendered and parolenfantry brigades of the old army of Western Virginia. After suffering severely during the valley battles of 1864, the division was badly cut up in the fight at Waynesboro, March 2, 1865. After the close of the war General Wharton lived at Radford. Brigadier-General Williams Carter Wickham Brigadier-General Williams Carter Rejoining General Early at Brown's gap, Wickham was ordered to guard Rockfish gap, and on arriving at the foot of the mountain attacked the Federal cavalry at Waynesboro, driving them back. The next day the enemy retreated down the valley, and the lines of the armies were established at Bridgewater. General Wickham resigned hi
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
k to the close of the war. His record was an active and most honorable one. Among the long list of battles in which he took part were: Pocotaligo, Battery Wagner, July 10 to 19, 1863; Columbia, and Congaree River, in South Carolina; and Berryville, Snicker's Gap, Winchester, Kernstown, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Newtown, Stevenson's Depot, Darkville, Strasburg, Rappahannock Station, Brandy Station, Culpeper, Orange Court House, Gordonsville, Trevilian Station, New Market, Lacy's Springs, Waynesboro, Sylvan Grove, Panther Gap, Buffalo Gap, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Beaver Dam Station, South and North Anna rivers, Cold Harbor, Hawe's Shop, Gaines' Mill, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Fort Darling, Drewry's Bluff, Hanover, Samaria Church, Dutch Gap, Gravelly Run, Deep Bottom, New market Heights, Chester Station, Swift Creek, Petersburg, Weldon Road, Lee's Mills, Ream's Station, Fort Hill, Poplar Springs, Arthur's Swamp, Darbytown Road, Hatcher's Run, Stony Creek, Dinwid
ts swam the river above the bridge, and drove the opposing force to Kline's mills, about seven miles from Staunton. Early, with about three thousand men, was at Staunton, and, as Sheridan approached, the rebel general made a rapid retreat to Waynesboro, whereupon Sheridan entered Staunton. He had now to determine whether to move on Lynchburg, leaving Early in his rear, or to go out and fight him, opening Rockfish Gap, and then pass through the Blue Ridge and destroy the railroads and canal. d been pouring for two days, the roads were bad beyond description, and horses and men could hardly be recognized through the mud that covered them; but Custer was ordered to take up the pursuit, followed closely by Devin. Early was found at Waynesboro in a well-chosen position, behind breastworks, with two brigades of infantry and a force of cavalry under Rosser. Custer, without waiting to make a reconnoissance, and thus allow the enemy to get up his courage by delay, disposed his troops at
ode's Hill, where I halted until the enemy's infantry came up next day and was trying to flank me, when I moved off in line of battle for eight miles, occasionally halting to check the enemy. This continued till nearly sundown, when I got a position at which I checked the enemy's further progress for that day, and then moved under cover of night towards Port Republic to unite with Kershaw. After doing this, I drove a division of cavalry from my front at Port Republic, and then moved to Waynesboro, where two divisions under Torbert were destroying the bridge, and drove them away; and, after remaining there one day, I moved to the vicinity of Mount Crawford, where I awaited the arrival of Rosser's brigade to take the offensive; but, before it arrived, the enemy was discovered to be falling back on the morning of the 6th. I immediately commenced following the enemy, and arrived here on the 7th, and have been waiting to ascertain whether Sheridan intends crossing the Blue Ridge before
econd movement against Washington, 19-22; movements on Potomac, 22-28; battle of Winchester, 29; manoeuvres in Shenandoah valley, 84; battle of Tom's brook, 86; battle of Cedar creek, 91-10; characteristics of, 106-108; retreat from Staunton to Waynesboro, 413; battle of Waynesboro, 413; capture of entire forces of, 414; removed from command, 414. Egan, General Thomas W., at battle of Hatcher's run, III., 124. Election, Presidential effect of, on the war, III., 166; rebel machinations in tnterference at, 12; Early's campaign against, 430-444; telegraphic communication cut off from City Point, 444; Grant protects, 445, 450; Halleck's method of protecting, 450; Grant reinforces, 469, 490. Washington, N. C., capture, II., 57. Waynesboro, battle of, III., 413, 414. Wauhatchie, battle of, i., 449, 450. Weitzel, General G. movement north of James river, October 28, 1864, III., 123; Wilmington expedition 225; at Fort Fisher, 315, 323; at Bermuda Hundred, 442; enters Richmond
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
it and the railroad bridge, upon which the enemy were at work. Two companies of boys and reserves from Staunton and Waynesboro, with a battery, had fallen back in front of Wilson's command to the mouth of the tunnel. Their pieces had been withdrtacle. When well up, the First Virginia cavalry was dismounted and sent down the Chesapeake and Ohio railroads towards Waynesboro and the bridge over the Shenandoah. The Fourth Virginia, mounted, was ordered to charge the enemy's reserve picket. Ces with splendid effect. They scattered and started back at a run, and as long as there was a mark to fire at, east of Waynesboro, his guns blazed at it. Arriving at the river, the First, Second and Third were mounted, but the Fourth had pushed on, how small a number we had, he urged his Colonel to charge the Fourth Virginia cavalry as it entered the main street of Waynesboro. (So he told me in conversation when a prisoner in our hands after the fight.) The Colonel ordered him to charge. He
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fight at Waynesboroa. (search)
it and the railroad bridge, upon which the enemy were at work. Two companies of boys and reserves from Staunton and Waynesboro, with a battery, had fallen back in front of Wilson's command to the mouth of the tunnel. Their pieces had been withdrtacle. When well up, the First Virginia cavalry was dismounted and sent down the Chesapeake and Ohio railroads towards Waynesboro and the bridge over the Shenandoah. The Fourth Virginia, mounted, was ordered to charge the enemy's reserve picket. Ces with splendid effect. They scattered and started back at a run, and as long as there was a mark to fire at, east of Waynesboro, his guns blazed at it. Arriving at the river, the First, Second and Third were mounted, but the Fourth had pushed on, how small a number we had, he urged his Colonel to charge the Fourth Virginia cavalry as it entered the main street of Waynesboro. (So he told me in conversation when a prisoner in our hands after the fight.) The Colonel ordered him to charge. He
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A list of Confederate officers, prisoners, who were held by Federal authority on Morris Island, S. C., under Confederate fire from September 7th to October 21st, 1864. (search)
hery, 16th Va. cav., Manassas Junction. Zzz=1st Lt. James Childs, 16th Va. cav., Warrenton. Zzz=1st Lt. S. T. Carson, 5th inft., Steele's Station. Zzz=1st Lt. Jesse Child, 42d inft., Richmond. Zzz=1st Lt. Geo. H. Rillian, 5th inft., Waynesboro. Zzz=1st Lt. J. M. Gilison, 25th inft., Mint Springs. Adjt. D. M. Layton, 25th inft., Mt. Meridian. 1st Lt. R. B. Howlett, 5th cav., Coles' Creek, Zzz=1st Lt. O. H. P. Lewis, 31st inft., Beverly, Randolph county, W. Va. Zzz=1st Lt. Mton, 42d inft., Campbell C. H. Zzz=1st Lt. D. W. Garrett, 42d inft., Morganton, Ga. 1st Lt. H. T. Coalter, 53d inft., King William C. H. Zzz=1st Lt. W. E. Bower, 25th inft., Franklin county. Zzz=1st Lt. W. L. Huntis, 43d bat. cav., Waynesboro. Zzz=1st Lt. W. L. Bernard, 37th bat. cav., Rocky Mt. Zzz=1st Lt. T. S. Mitchell, 42d inft., Morrisville. Zzz=1st Lt. P. M. Dalton, 42d inft. Patrick C. H. Zzz=1st Lt. H. L. Hover, 25th Va. inft., Staunton. Zzz=1st Lt. T. J. Risk
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last days of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Walker on the railroad defences, numbering 1,414 enlisted men, and unattached commands numbering 504 enlisted men. Badeau assumes, indeed asserts, that the troops in the Valley and those on the Richmond and Danville defences were used in the final defence of the Richmond and Petersburg lines. Was he so ignorant of events of which he writes that he did not know that over half of Early's little force in the Valley included in that return was either killed, wounded or captured in battle near Waynesboro, Va, with Sheridan's cavalry on March 2, 1865? Those who escaped were disorganized, and when reorganized the greater part of them remained in the Valley—not over a fifth of the force, if that much, ever reached Lee. The troops on the Richmond and Danville railroad, the integrity of which line of supply was so vital to Lee, and then so heavily threatened, were, of course, not available to guard the Petersburg lines. Badeau's method of arriving at Lee's effective strength on the 25th of
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