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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
Manassas, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Malvern Hill, Cedar Mountain, Groveton, Fauquier Springs, Bristoe, Second Manassas, Ox Hill, (or Chantilly), Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville (or Second Fredericksburg), Salem Church, Winchester, Gettysburg, Second Bristoe, Rappahannock, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, the Po, Bethesda, Lynchburg, Monocacy, Washington, Parker's Ford, Shepperdstown, Kernstown, Winchester again (or Oppequan), Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek and Waynesboro, and in many less affairs, such as Auburn, Summerville Ford, Fairfield and Port Republic. Some of these names stand for several days of battle. I doubt if there was an officer or soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia who, in the open field, was oftener under fire. He was the right-hand man of Jackson, in his corps, and the right-hand man of Lee, after Jackson had fallen, and he enjoyed the abiding confidence of both. He was successively a colonel, a brigadier-general, a major-gener
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
eral Jackson, and sent to Lexington, Va., to invoke the aid of the wonderful memory of our late Captain McLaughlin. A new and satisfactory roll was thus made out, and it was said that a year afterwards the lost rolls were found, and that the new one thus made out nearly corresponded with the lost history. On May 4th, the company reached Cocke's Tavern, on the old turnpike leading from Charlottesville to Staunton. On the 5th, it re-crossed the Blue Ridge at Rockfish gap, passed through Waynesboro, and bivouacked a few miles east of Staunton. On the 6th, it passed through Staunton to neighborhood of West View, and on the 7th and 8th continued its march toward Monterey, the county-seat of Highland county, reaching, on the 8th, the foot of the mountain east of the village of McDowell, which was then occupied by Federal troops under General Milroy. The infantry advanced to the top of the mountain and became hotly engaged with the enemy, who were in a strong position. Our battery
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
at New Market, and on the 10th of November moved down the Valley again and confronted Sheridan on the 11th and 12th in front of his intrenchments between Newtown and Kearnstown, and then retired back to New Market because provisions and forage could not be obtained in the lower Valley. The expeditions by which the posts of New creek and Beverly were subsequently captured, were sent out also from my force in the Valley. The strong force which General Grant says was entrenched under me at Waynesboro, when Sheridan advanced up the Valley in the latter part of February, 1865, with two divisions of cavalry of 5,000 each (10,000 in all), consisted of about 1,000 infantry and a few pieces of artillery, most of my infantry having been returned to General Lee to meet corresponding detachments from Sheridan to Grant, and all my cavalry and most of the artillery having been sent off on account of the impossibility of foraging the horses in the Valley. Obvious reasons of policy prevented any p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
s deceived and routed. Payne remarked to his men: We must relieve our general at all hazards. I rely upon your courage to save him. In the winter of 1862-‘63, the Black Horse occupied their native heath, and scouted the counties of Fauquier and Stafford thoroughly, reporting all the movements of the enemy to Generals Lee and Jackson, who complimented them for their effective service. They participated in the various engagements of Stuart with Pleasanton's cavalry, and in the fight at Waynesboro against Sheridan's famous cohorts, the Black Horse was the leading squadron of the Fourth Virginia. It was in this battle that one of Sheridan's captains displayed great valor, wounding four of the Black Horse with his sabre; and leading a charge, his men following but a short distance, the gallant Yankee captain dashed on without looking behind and was unaccompanied, into the very head of the Black column. Not wishing to cut down so dashing a fellow, who had put himself in their power,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
onsidered Mr. Armistead Gordon's poem the finest on such an occasion he had read since the war. With many other distinguishing qualities, I am happy that Virginia has in this son one who writes so beautifully in verse. He has written as well in prose, it may be assumed, for, as fellow student with Thomas Nelson Page at the University of Virginia, he yielded to the latter (it has been admitted), some conceptions-upon which our dialect writer rose to fame and wealth. G. Julian Pratt. Waynesboro, Va., January 25, 1898. The Confederate dead. The grief that circled his brow with a crown of thorns was also that which wreathed them with the splendor of immortality.— Castelar's Savonarola. I. Where are they who marched away, Sped with smiles that changed to tears, Glittering lines of steel and gray Moving down the battle's way— Where are they these many years? Garlands wreathed their shining swords; They were girt about with cheers, Children's lispings, women's words, Sunsh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
y the cruel bullet. He was not only the eye of Jackson, but he was felt, as the avant-courier (being always with the advancing column), to be the protecting Aegis of our army, and thus, his death was to our cause and to all an incalculable loss. The newspapers have recently given us a tribute from a foe, from whom much was expected by the Federals—Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, that it was a cruel calamity that one so brave as Ashby should fall. I viewed the remains about the same time at Waynesboro that the doughty Englishman did, although the tribute was not uttered in my hearing.—Editor. his horse having been killed just before. Private M. Warner Hewes of Ashby's Cavalry cut the saddle girth and secured the saddle. Jackson visited the room where Ashby's body lay and asked to be left alone in silent communion with his dead cavalry chief. Within one year the corpse of the illustrous chieftian himself likewise received the homage of all the good and the brave. Stonewall Jackso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland Confederates. (search)
y the cruel bullet. He was not only the eye of Jackson, but he was felt, as the avant-courier (being always with the advancing column), to be the protecting Aegis of our army, and thus, his death was to our cause and to all an incalculable loss. The newspapers have recently given us a tribute from a foe, from whom much was expected by the Federals—Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, that it was a cruel calamity that one so brave as Ashby should fall. I viewed the remains about the same time at Waynesboro that the doughty Englishman did, although the tribute was not uttered in my hearing.—Editor. his horse having been killed just before. Private M. Warner Hewes of Ashby's Cavalry cut the saddle girth and secured the saddle. Jackson visited the room where Ashby's body lay and asked to be left alone in silent communion with his dead cavalry chief. Within one year the corpse of the illustrous chieftian himself likewise received the homage of all the good and the brave. Stonewall Jackso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
as Medical Director with Jackson, Ewell, Early and Gordon, with whom I successively served as Chief Surgeon, or Medical Director, until the close of the war. A week before the defeat and capture of the greater portion of General Early's army at Waynesboro by Sheridan in 1865, I released the Medical Inspector of General Sheridan, who had been captured by some of our troops in the Valley of Virginia. When, among others, I was captured at Waynesboro, General Sheridan sent for me and after a shortWaynesboro, General Sheridan sent for me and after a short talk released me from prison on parole on the same terms that I had accorded to his medical officers. The fact of the release of the Federal surgeons at Winchester in May, 1862, was noticed by the Confederate States Medical and Surgical Journal and by the different newspapers of that period. Soon after the release of these Federal surgeons, and I believe in consequence of their parole, a number of Confederate surgeons, then in Northern prisons, were sent home. From the Confederate War Jour
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
ere fresh, vigorous and well equipped. Jones and his men fought well, but he was killed early in the action. His death had a bad effect on his command, and it gave way in much confusion and with heavy loss. Much good was done during the confusion by Lieutenant Carter Berkeley and his two ubiquitous guns, which afterwards did such good service in the lines around Lynchburg and upon Hunter's retreat. After this disaster Jones' command, under Vaughan, fell back first to Fishersville and Waynesboro, and then towards Charlottesville. This left the Valley open as far as Buchanan, except for the small, but ever vigilant force of cavalry, so skillfully and manfully handled by Brigadier-General John McCausland, who had shortly before been transferred from the command of an infantry to a cavalry brigade. Imboden, with a small body of cavalry, which had escaped from the battle of Piedmont, and which was badly mounted and equipped, had crossed the Blue Ridge and was energetically attemp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Captain Don P. Halsey, C. S. A. (search)
the editor of the Central Presbyterian, and who served with Captain Halsey on General Wharton's staff, writes of his capture as follows: At the retreat from Waynesboro he and I were among the few officers that escaped the town. I overtook him on the east side of the Shenandoah and we rode together half-way up the mountain towout the same time Major J. P. Smith was assigned as inspector-general. Major Halsey as adjutant-general served in this capacity until the unfortunate affair at Waynesboro, when General Early, thinking that Sheridan would take the same route to Lynchburg that Hunter had taken, viz: through Lexington, placed our troops on the west side of Waynesboro, with the river in our rear, effectually preventing any retreat. As we had only about 800 men to oppose 7,500 splendidly equipped cavalry, of course we had no show and fell an easy victim. Your gallant father had charge of my left wing and held his position as long as possible. When forced back he reported t
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