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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 71 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 70 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 66 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 52 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for West Point (Virginia, United States) or search for West Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 5 document sections:

confusion among them. As an evidence of this we may state the fact that Dr. Thomas Carpenter and two companions succeeded in gathering up upwards of fifty, who, without any organization, were wandering about in apparent bewilderment. Other parties were similarly captured, and during the day small squads of a dozen or more were continually arriving in the city. During the day, a portion of the cavalry of Gen. Stuart captured and destroyed several transports on the Pamunkey river near West Point. Thus are the means of escape for the enemy being cut off; so that, in any view of the case, there seems to be little probability of their getting off in force. Early in the day it was stated, with some degree of plausibility, that the forces of Gen. Jackson had succeeded in bagging some forty-five hundred of the enemy; and although we have no positive confirmation of the statement, we are inclined to think it correct in the main. Certain it is, that the vigilance of that distinguis
. The way "Linkum" Travels. The New York Herald tells, as follows, how Abe traveled to West Point: President Lincoln left Washington at five o'clock on the evening of Monday last by a special train for this city en route to West-Point. He arrived at Jersey City at about one o'clock yesterday morning, and immediately crossing by the ferry, stepped into a carriage which was in waitinging at Garrison's they crossed the ferry, and were soon comfortably lodged at Cozzens's Hotel, West Point, where they arrived at four o'clock in the morning. A dispatch was received in the city yt the hour named. Thus, in eleven hours the Chief Magistrate had travelled from Washington to West Point — a distance of nearly three hundred miles. As every movement had been arranged beforehand by President went straight through the whole distance. Gen. Scott, who has been for sometime at West Point, was telegraphed to for the purpose of meeting and receiving the President; and, notwithstandi
Lincoln at West Point. changes to be made in the Cabinet — no more new Generals to be made — a Characteristic speech from the Gorilla, &c. An account of Abe Lincoln's visit to West Point is amusing. The correspondent states that Abe went to bed "like any ordinary man," when he reached the place. In conversatich to "my warm Union loving friend, of New Jersey," he said that his visit to West Point was not "to make or unmake any Generals." A correspondent of the N. Y. Expresange in the programme, and it was settled that General Scott should return to West Point to-night, and there await the missive which will probably soon summon him to to tell you why I went to see General Scott. I can only say that my visit to West Point did not have the importance which has been attached to it, but it concerned md the crowd dispersed. Gen. Scott, on arriving on the New York was driven to his hotel, where he will remain till afternoon, when he will return to West Point.
found impossible to accommodate all of the Yankee officers recently captured with quarters in the warehouses called sometimes "Libby's buildings," the Government has engaged a house on 18th street, and it was being prepared for their accommodation on yesterday. The Gen. Reynolds, of Illinois, mentioned as among the captives, used to be a Professor at West Point. As a boarder at the C. S. Prison he is now in charge of Lieut. T. P. Turner, who, in former years, was his pupil at West Point. found impossible to accommodate all of the Yankee officers recently captured with quarters in the warehouses called sometimes "Libby's buildings," the Government has engaged a house on 18th street, and it was being prepared for their accommodation on yesterday. The Gen. Reynolds, of Illinois, mentioned as among the captives, used to be a Professor at West Point. As a boarder at the C. S. Prison he is now in charge of Lieut. T. P. Turner, who, in former years, was his pupil at West Point.
Lincoln Makes a night journey. It is stated that King Lincoln made a hurried night journey on the 24th instant, from Washington City to West Point, after the manner of his rapid nocturnal transit in Scotch cap and military cloak from Harrisburg to Washington. The Herald suggests that it was to meet Gen. Scott and Gen. Pope with a view to important military arrangements in Virginia. McClellan, it seems, was too slow, while affairs generally in the Valley have gone away with the Federalists. It seems that Blenker is superseded by Carl Shurz, "Fremont is falling back;" "Shields has fallen from grace," and "McDowell has fallen from his horse," so injuring himself as to be hors de combat. All this added to Banks's humiliation, sets the troubled King off in the night to consult Old Lundy and General Pope. The latter General, the Herald thinks, is, in the estimation of the President, the rising military star to whom to trust the retrieval of affairs in Virginia.--Pope is from Illi