Your search returned 143 results in 47 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
nction and Warrenton, and marched rapidly back in three columns. I directed McDowell, with his own and Sigel's corps, to march upon Gainesville by the Warrenton and Alexandria turnpike; Reno and one division of Heintzelman to march on Greenwich, and with Porter's corps and Hooker's division, I marched back to Manassas Junction. McDowell was ordered to interpose between the forces of the enemy which had passed down to Manassas through Gainesville, and his main body moving down from White Plains through Thoroughfare Gap. This was completely accomplished, Longstreet, who had passed through the Gap, being driven back to the west side (!!!) The forces to Greenwich were designed to support McDowell in case he met too large a force of the enemy. The division of Hooker, marching towards Manassas, came upon the enemy near Kettle Run, on the afternoon of the twenty-seventh, and after a sharp action, routed them completely, killing and wounding three hundred, capturing camps, baggag
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. (search)
A very large amount of stores and provisions had been abandoned for want of transportation, and among the stores was a quantity of clothing, blankets, etc., which had been provided by the States south of Virginia for their own troops. The pile of trunks along the railroad was appalling to behold. All these stores, clothing, trunks, etc., were consigned to the flames by a portion of our cavalry left to carry out the work of their destruction. The loss of stores at this point, and at White Plains, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, where a large amount of meat had been salted and stored, was a very serious one to us, and embarrassed us for the remainder of the war, as it put us at once on a running stock. The movement back from the line of Bull Run was in itself a very wise one in a strategic point of view, if it was not one of absolute necessity, but the loss of stores was very much to be regretted. I do not pretend to attach censure to any one of our officials for this loss, esp
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. (search)
mortally wounded. Part of the Kanawha division under General Scammon was ordered to its support, but was only in time to assist in its retreat. Reporting this affair, General Jackson said,--The advance was made with great spirit and determination, and under a leader worthy of a better cause. The spoils were then quietly divided, such as could be consumed or hauled off, and the balance given to the torch. I marched from the Rappahannock, following on Jackson's trail, and camped at White Plains. The march during the day was delayed about an hour by a large force of cavalry which showed itself on my right front. As I had no cavalry, a little time was spent in learning of its import and following. General Pope ordered McDowell, with his own corps, including Reynolds's division and Sigel's corps, to march so as to be at Gainesville at nightfall; Reno's corps and Kearny's division of the Third to Greenwich to support McDowell. He rode with Hooker's division of the Third along
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 19: effort to effect exchange of prisoners-evacuation of Manassas-visit to Fredericksburg. (search)
arge amount of stores and provisions had been abandoned for want of transportation, and among the stores was a very large quantity of clothing, blankets, etc., which had been provided by the States south of Virginia for their own troops. The pile of trunks along the railroad was appalling to behold. All these stores, clothing, trunks, etc., were consigned to the flames by a portion of our cavalry left to carry out the work of their destruction. The loss of stores at this point, and at White Plains, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, where a large amount of meat had been salted and stored, was a very serious one to us, and embarrassed us for the remainder of the war, as it put us at once on a running stock. The same officer subsequently wrote, in regard to the loss of supplies: I believe that all might have been carried off from Manassas if the railroads had been energetically operated. On March 10th the President, not then informed of General Johnston's retrograde movement
f prisoners, horses, stores, etc., fell into their hands. After remaining three hours in Stafford, camp-fires were built on the hills to deceive the rebels, while the National forces withdrew from the place. The casualties of General Sickles's troops were two wounded and a few missing.--N. Y. Commercial, April 5. A rebel force of seven regiments of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, and three batteries, were thrown across the Rapahannock River to cut off Col. Geary's command at White Plains, Va. By a forced march they reached Salem, within five miles of the Union band, last evening, with the intent of attacking Col. Geary's command in two columns, cutting off his retreat, and then seizing the formidable Gap, to intercept the progress of reconstructing the Manassas Gap Railroad. The attack was to be made at daybreak this morning. Their movements were made secretly, with the intention of making a dash, and cutting the Union command to pieces. Col. Geary became apprized of t
September 16. The rebel steamer Lizzie Davis, from Havana, for Mobile, Ala., was captured in latitude 25° 58′ north, longitude 85° 11′ west, by the National flag-ship San Jacinto.--the rebel forces made an attempt to recross the Rapid Ann River, but were foiled by the National artillery and cavalry. They advanced in three columns, with artillery, toward the river, but being opposed by the Union troops on the north side, soon fell back.--A spirited skirmish took place at White Plains, Va., in which the rebels were dispersed in dis
artillery. Under these circumstances I abandoned the project of going to Union, but made up my mind not to surrender in any event. I directed the head of my column on the road to Aldie, when an engagement commenced at once, the enemy opening on both flanks with heavy volleys, yelling to us to surrender. I at once directed Captain Bixby, the officer commanding the advance-guard, to charge any force in his front, and follow the Aldie road to that point where it connects with the road to White Plains. This order was executed most admirably. Captain Bixby's horse was shot and.he himself wounded. We were then in an extremely hazardous position, the enemy being in front, rear and on both flanks, and were intermixed with us for more than an hour, till we reached the road leading to Hopeville Gap. I must freely praise the gallant conduct of the brave officers and men who were fighting side by side with overwhelming numbers of the enemy with the most determined valor, preferring rat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
five rounds to the man being on hand. Before this time it had become apparent that Jackson, with his whole force, was south of the Warrenton pike and in the immediate neighborhood of Manassas Junction. McDowell reached his position at Gainesville during the night of the 27th, and Kearny and Reno theirs at Greenwich. It was clear on that night that we had completely interposed between Jackson and the enemy's main body, which was still west of the Bull Run range, and in the vicinity of White Plains. In consequence of Hooker's report, and the weakness of the small division which he commanded, and to strengthen my right wing moving in the direction of Manassas, I sent orders to Porter at dark, which reached him at 9 P. M., to move forward from Warrenton Junction at 1 A. M. night, and to report to me at Bristoe Station by daylight next morning (August 28th). There were but two courses left to Jackson by this sudden movement of the army. He could not retrace his steps through Gai
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
f contest with Branch's brigade, moving on Union Mills at the head of A. P. Hill's division. Waagner's force was soon driven off, and in his retreat was harried by Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry from Centreville to Fairfax, where they met the 14th Massachusetts regiment (1st Massachusetts Heavy Artillery), Col. W. B. Greene, which had also been ordered forward. Colonel L. B. Pierce, 12th Pennsylvania Cavalry, was ill and in the hospital at Manassas; the rest of his regiment had been sent toward White Plains, and a portion of it seems to have encountered the advance of Stuart's cavalry at Hay Market and Gainesville; the remains of this regiment, as General McClellan describes them, were reunited near Alexandria. Shortly after driving off Waagner's force, A. P. Hill's advance met and overpowered Taylor's New Jersey brigade of Slocum's division supported by part of Scammon's brigade of the Kanawha division. Taylor and Scammon were hurrying forward from Washington.--Editors. Early next morni
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
Loudon Valley, and returned on the 3d of December by way of Grove Creek, Snicker's Gap, and Berryville. Another left Winchester under General A. T. A. Torbert, on the 19th of December, 1864, and went by way of Stony Point to front Royal, and through Chester Gap, by Sperryville and Madison Court-House, to Gordonsville, which they reached on the 23d. Thence, on their return, they went by Culpeper Court-House, to Warrenton. There the column divided, a part going by Salem, and the other by White Plains and Middleburg, to Paris, and thence to Winchester, where they arrived on the 28th. Sheridan left Winchester on the 27th of February, on a damp and cheer-less morning, with about ten thousand men, composed of the First cavalry division, under General W. Merritt, and the Third cavalry division, under General George A. Custer. To the latter division was added a brigade of the cavalry of the old Army of West Virginia, under Colonel Capeheart. Sheridan's men were all mounted. They move
1 2 3 4 5