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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 66 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 54 6 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 54 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 53 7 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 50 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 49 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 46 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 45 1 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 42 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 42 2 Browse Search
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blockading the mouth of James river and cutting off communication from Norfolk. The Congress frigate was lying near her, off the News; while the Minnesota lay below, under the guns of Fortress Monroe. The Ericsson Monitor — the first of her class, and equally an experiment as her rebel rival-had come round a few days before to watch the Virginia, as the new iron-clad was now rechristened. The great ship being ready, Flag-Officer Buchanan ordered the Jamestown, Captain Barney, and the Yorktown, Captain Tucker, down from Richmond; while he went out with the Raleigh and Beaufort --two of the smallest class of gunboats, saved by Captain Lynch from Roanoke Island. This combined force-four of the vessels being frail wooden shells, formerly used as river passenger boats-carried only twenty-seven guns. But Buchanan steamed boldly out, on the morning of the 8th of March, to attack an enemy carrying quite two hundred and twenty of the heaviest guns in the United States navy! It was
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 6: manoeuvring on the Peninsula. (search)
an then sat down before the fortifications at Yorktown and along Warwick River and began a siege by ment received from that army by Magruder. Yorktown had been previously strongly fortified, and sith earthworks. Between Warwick River and Yorktown were two redoubts, called respectively Redoubad of a deep ravine between Redoubt No. 4 and Yorktown on the other. Redoubt No. 4, which was the one nearest Yorktown, was sometimes called Fort Magruder. Gloucester Point, across York River from Yot Fredericksburg, had reached the vicinity of Yorktown, and on that day General Johnston, having assll to the command of the left wing, including Yorktown, and Redoubts 4 and 5, and their appertinent e defence of the head of the ravine south of Yorktown. Shortly afterwards General Hill made a new commanders that the line of Warwick River and Yorktown was to be abandoned, according to a determinaI was attached, moved on the direct road from Yorktown to Williamsburg, but our progress was very sl[9 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 8: battles around Richmond. (search)
aggregate present for duty 105,825. See page 53. On page 239, he says: The report of the Chief of the Secret Service Corps, herewith forwarded, and dated 26th of June, shows the estimated strength of the enemy, at the time of the evacuation of Yorktown, to have been from 100,000 to 120,000. The same report puts his numbers on the 26th of June at about 180,000, and the specific information obtained regarding their organization warrants the belief that this estimate did not exceed his actual stestroying bridges. General McClellan, it must be confessed, displayed considerable ability in conducting the retreat of his army after it was out-manceuvred and beaten, notwithstanding the excessive caution he had shown on the Potomac and at Yorktown, and I think there can be no doubt he was the ablest commander the United States had in Virginia during the war, by long odds. During the seven days operations around Richmond, the two armies were more nearly equal in strength than they ever we
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
ssible to his regimental headquarters in Texas. The death of the adopted son of Washington, October 10, 1857, in his seventy-sixth year, was greatly deplored. His unbounded hospitality was as broad as his acres, and his vivid recollections of the Father of his Country, though only eighteen when he died, and whose memory he venerated, were most charmingly narrated. His father, John Parke Custis, the son of Mrs. Washington by her first husband, was Washington's aid-de-camp at the siege of Yorktown, and died at the early age of twenty-eight. G. W. P. Custis, the grandson of Mrs. Washington, was educated at Princeton. His early life was passed at Mount Vernon, but after the death of his grandmother, in 1802, he built Arlington House, opposite the city of Washington, on an estate left him by his father. In his will he decreed that all of his slaves should be set free after the expiration of five years. The time of manumission came in 1863, when the flames of war were fiercely ragi
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
on of his commission and his decision to fight under the flag of the South was hailed with delight by the Southern people, who felt they were securing the services of an army commander of undoubted merit. General Benjamin Huger, another distinguished officer of the army of the United States, who had also resigned, was charged with watching over Norfolk. General John Bankhead Magruder, who had acquired distinction in the Federal army but had joined his fortunes to the South, was ordered to Yorktown to defend the peninsular route. General Holmes, who had rendered conspicuous service in the army of the United States, was sent to command at Acquia Creek, some twelve miles east of Fredericksburg. Robert Garnett, also an officer of the United States Army, of-tested ability, was ordered to West Virginia to take charge of the department and of the forces assembling in that region. All of these officers had been selected with great care, and had been more or less distinguished in the arm
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
ceded him. Magruder was a short distance in his front with eleven thousand men. His left was at Yorktown, on York River, and his line of battle extended along the Warwick River to Mulberry Island, on the James, where his right rested. Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown, projects well out into the river. Fortifications had been constructed there, and it was expected that the guns at that point as well as those at Yorktown by crossfire could prevent the passage of the Federals up York River in any attempt to reach the Confederate rear. It will be remembered that when the British held YorkYorktown over a century ago they also fortified and held Gloucester Point, and to it, at one time, Cornwallis attempted to retreat when the troops of Washington were closing around him. Magruder's front n arrived in person April 14th, and assumed command on the 17th. His advance did not arrive at Yorktown till the 10th, the other divisions following a few days later. For six days McClellan was in
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
No man could have behaved better than General Grant did under the circumstances, said Lee to a friend in Richmond. He did not touch my sword; the usual custom is for the sword to be received when tendered, and then handed back, but he did not touch mine. Neither did the Union chief enter the Southern lines to show himself or to parade his victory, or go to Richmond or Petersburg to exult over a fallen people, but mounted his horse and with his staff started for Washington. Washington, at Yorktown, was not as considerate and thoughtful of the feelings of Cornwallis or his men. Charges were now withdrawn from the guns, flags furled, and the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia turned their backs upon each other for the first time in four long, bloody years. The Southern soldiers, wrapped in faded, tattered uniforms, shoeless and weather-beaten, but proud as when they first rushed to battle, returned to desolate fields, homes in some cases in ashes, blight, blast,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
ion, 10. White House, 164, 167. White Oak Swamp, 153, 162. White, Professor, 281. White, William, of Lexington, 406. Whiting, General W. H. C., 155. Whittier, Colonel, of Humphreys's staff, 391. Wickham family, the, 305. Wigfall, Senator, of Texas, 332. Wilcox's brigade at Gettysburg, 279-297. Wilderness, battles of the, 329. Wilderness tavern, 247, 329. William and Mary College, 33. William the Conqueror, 2, 141, 278. Williams, General, Seth, 262, 389, 390. Windsor Forest estate, 18. Windsor, General, Charles, 180. Wirtz, Captain, trial of, 407. Wise, General Henry A., 76, xno, 113, 117, 118, 119, 123, 347. Withers, John, 150. Wolsey, Cardinal, mentioned, 65. Wool, General John E., 34, 35. Worth, General William J., 400. Wright, General H. G., succeeds Sedgwick, 334. Yellow Tavern, battle of, 337. Yorktown, 136. Young Napoleon, 114. Ziegler's Grove at Gettysburg, 296. Zook, General, killed at Gettysburg, 302. The End.
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, April, 1863. (search)
t. After we had agreed to do this, I had a long and agreeable conversation with the General, who spoke of the Puritans with intense disgust, and of the first importation of them as that pestiferous crew of the Mayflower ; but he is by no means rancorous against individual Yankees. He spoke very favorably of McClellan, whom he knew to be a gentleman, clever, and personally brave, though he might lack moral courage to face responsibility. Magruder had commanded the Confederate troops at Yorktown which opposed McClellan's advance. He told me the different dodges he had resorted to, to blind and deceive the latter as to his (Magruder's) strength; and he spoke of the intense relief and amusement with which he had at length seen McClellan with his magnificent army begin to break ground before miserable earthworks, defended only by 8,000 men. Hooker was in his regiment, and was essentially a mean man and a liar. Of Lee and Longstreet he spoke in terms of the highest admiration. M
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 13 (search)
country occupied by the enemy. The clerks are all Marylanders, as well as the detectives, and the latter intend to remain here to my great chagrin. March 14 The Provost Marshal, Col. Porter, has had new passports printed, to which his own name is to be appended. I am requested to sign it for him, and to instruct the clerks generally. March 15 For several days troops have been pouring through the city, marching down the Peninsula. The enemy are making demonstrations against Yorktown. March 16 I omitted to note in its place the gallant feat of Commodore Buchanan with the iron monster Merrimac in Hampton Roads. He destroyed two of the enemy's best ships of war. My friends, Lieutenants Parker and Minor, partook of the glory, and were severely wounded. March 17 Col. Porter has resigned his provost marshalship, and is again succeeded by Capt. Godwin, a Virginian, and I like him very well, for he is truly Southern in his instincts. March 18 A Mr. MacCubbin
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