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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 39 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 26 2 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 22 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 16 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 0 Browse Search
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A company of cavalry is just going by my tent on the road toward Beverly, probably to watch the front. As we were leaving camp this mored to believe the mountains and hills lying between this place and Beverly are strongly fortified and full of men. We can see a part of the ealley, and of Cheat mountain beyond, and before nightfall reached Beverly and went into camp. July, 13 Six or eight hundred Southern tto the summit this morning to fortify. The Colonel has gone to Beverly. The boys repeat his Rich mountain speech with slight variations: A musician belonging to the Fourth Ohio, when six miles out of Beverly, on his way to Phillippi, was fired upon and instantly killed. Sobeaten at Manassas with terrible loss. General McClellan has left Beverly for Washington. General Rosecrans will assume command in Western t four thousand men in this vicinity, and two or three thousand at Beverly. We shall be in telegraphic communication with the North to-morro
ar ever comes to an end and his sweetheart survives. October, 14 The paymaster has been busy. The boys are very bitter against the sutler, realizing, for the first time, that sutler's chips cost money, and that they have wasted on jimcracks too much of their hard earnings. Conway has taken a solemn Trish oath that the sutler shall never get another cent of him. But these are like the half repentant, but resultless, mutterings of the confirmed drunkard. The new leaf proposed to be turned over is never turned. October, 16 Am told that some of the boys lost in gambling every farthing of their money half an hour after receiving it from the paymaster. An Indiana soldier threw a bombshell into the fire to-day, and three men were seriously wounded by the explosion. The writer was absent from camp from October 21st to latter part of November, serving on courtmartial, first at Huttonville, and afterward at Beverly. In November the Third was transferred to Kentucky.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McClellan in West Virginia. (search)
all into our hands. Porterfield retreated to Beverly, some thirty miles farther to the south-east,ts that forces of the enemy were gathering at Beverly, McClellan determined to proceed in person to Staunton and Parkersburg Turnpike divides at Beverly, the Parkersburg route passing over a saddle nded in person. His depot of supplies was at Beverly, which was 16 miles from the Laurel Mountain khannon on June 25th, and thence at once upon Beverly; but delays occurred, and it was not till Julents to Middle Fork Bridge, about half-way to Beverly, and on the same day ordered Morris to march s right flank during the night and had gained Beverly. These, with the newly arrived Confederate rrris about midnight. He first marched toward Beverly, and was within five miles of that place whenr. He might have continued southward through Beverly almost at leisure, for McClellan did not ente the Tygart Valley River, six miles north of Beverly, and learned from some country people of Garn[9 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
and now held it with a force of about twenty-five hundred men; the remainder of the Federal force was in the vicinity of Beverly, a village a few miles west of Cheat river. General Loring, having satisfied himself that a direct attack on Cheat MounPass was impracticable, and that there was no force of the enemy near the west base of the Cheat Mountain except that at Beverly, determined to take command of the force which had been ordered to rendezvous at Huntersville, and advance by the Pass tof a supply train, as a matter of first importance. He appeared to overlook the fact that the line from Huntersville to Beverly, only forty miles long, was to be only temporary; for so soon as Cheat Mountain Pass was opened he would draw his suppliiam first arrived at Valley Mountain Pass. At that time he learned from the inhabitants and his scouts that the road to Beverly was unoccupied. But within the last day or two, a force of the Federals had advanced within less than a mile of his fro
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 50: operations in 1865. (search)
Chapter 50: operations in 1865. On the 2nd of January, 1865, I had a consultation with General Lee at Richmond, about the difficulties of my position in the Valley, and he told me that he had left me there with the small command which still remained in order to produce the impression that the force was much larger than it really was, and he instructed me to do the best I could. Before I returned from Richmond, Rosser started with between 300 and 400 picked cavalry, for the post of Beverly in West Virginia, and, on the 11th, surprised and captured the place, securing over 500 prisoners and some stores. This expedition was made over a very mountainous country, amid the snows of an unusually severe winter. Rosser's loss was very light, but Lieutenant Colonel Cook, of the 8th Virginia Cavalry, a most gallant and efficient officer, lost his leg in the attack, and had to be left behind. The great drought during the summer of 1864 had made the corn crop in the Valley a very shor
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
3, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 29, 31, 33, 34; 35, 38, 44, 46, 47, 51, 52, 341 Beaver Dam Creek, 361, 362 Beckham, Lieutenant, 22, 25, 26, 38 Bedford City, 372, 374 Bedford County, 378 Bee, General, 31, 32, 37 Belle Grove, 437, 441 Benning, Colonel, 81, 82 Berkeley County, 366, 367, 368 Bermuda Hundreds, 360 Bernard House, 196 Berry, Major, 11, 240, 251 Berry's Ferry, 396 Berryville, 164, 240, 369, 396, 397, 406, 411, 414, 420, 421 Bethesda Church, 362, 363 Beverly, 459 Beverly's Ford, 106 Big Calf Pasture, 327 Big Lick, 377 Big Springs, 134 Blackburn's Ford, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 31, 32, 39, 118, 119 Black Horse Cavalry, 157 Black Walnut Run, 318 Blacksburg, 327, 329 Blair, Postmaster General, U. S., 395 Blue Ridge, 10, 11, 63, 164, 165, 238, 284, 285, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 377, 396, 411, 413, 429, 433, 434, 457, 458, 459, 476 Board, Colonel, 397 Bolivar, 384 Bolivar Heights, 136, 1
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
int. In June this officer occupied, with a force of about five thousand men, Laurel Hill, thirteen miles south of Philippi, on the turnpike leading to Beverly, in Randolph County. McClellan reached Grafton on the 23d of the same month, and on the same day issued a proclamation to the inhabitants of West Virginia, and on the foll, which General Rosecrans successfully did with four regiments. The troops at this point were a portion of Garnett's force under Lieutenant-Colonel John Pegram. Beverly was occupied by the Federal troops the next day, and General Garnett with the remainder of his army, finding that retreat had been cut off in that direction, abas you are fast enough. After McDowell's defeat at Manassas, McClellan was selected to command the defenses at Washington, and the day after that battle, while at Beverly, was informed by Adjutant-General Thomas, at Washington, that his presence there without delay was necessary. General William S. Rosecrans succeeded him. On
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
by Burnside's corps of not less than twenty-five thousand effective men, and operate directly against Lee's army, wherever it may be found. Sigel collects all his available force in two columns, one, under Ord and Averell, to start from Beverly, Virginia, and the other, under Crook, to start from Charleston on the Kanawha, to move against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. Crook will have all cavalry, and will endeavor to get in about Saltville, and move east from there to join Ord. Heither of the great armies, but he can aid them by moving directly to his front. This he has been directed to do, and is now making preparations for it. Two columns of his command will make south at the same time with the general move; one from Beverly, from ten to twelve thousand strong, under Major-General Ord; the other from Charleston, Va., principally cavalry, under Brig.-General Crook. The former of these will endeavor to reach the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, about south of Covingt
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
There are also reports from Vicksburg, which still holds out. Accounts say that Grant has lost 40,000 men so far. Where Johnston is, we have no knowledge; but in one of his recent letters he intimated that the fall of Vicksburg was a matter of time. June 11 It appears that the enemy design to attack us. The following is Lee's dispatch: Culpepper, June 9th, 1863. To General S. Cooper. The enemy crossed the Rappahannock this morning at five o'clock A. M., at the various fords from Beverly to Kelly's, with a large force of cavalry, accompanied by infantry and artillery. After a severe contest till five P. M., Gen. Stuart drove them across the river. R. E. Lee. We have not received the details of this combat, further than that it was a surprise, not creditable to our officers in command, by which a portion of ten regiments and 600 horses were taken by the enemy. We lost, killed, also a number of cavalry colonels. We, too, captured several hundred prisoners, which have
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 47 (search)
The Examiner to-day has another article calling for a convention to abolish the Constitution and remove President Davis. Mr. Seward, United States Secretary of State, escorted Mrs. Foote to her hotel, upon her arrival in Washington. The following official telegram was received at the War Department last night: headquarters, January 15th, 1865. Hon. J. A. Seddon. Gen. Early reports that Gen. Rosser, at the head of three hundred men, surprised and captured the garrison at Beverly, Randolph County, on the 11th instant, killing and wounding a considerable number and taking five hundred and eighty prisoners. His loss slight. R. E. Lee. January 18 Cloudy and cool. Cannon heard down the river. No war news. But blockade-running at Wilmington has ceased; and common calico, now at $25 per yard, will soon be $50. The stupor in official circles continues, and seems likely to continue. A secret detective told the Assistant Secretary, yesterday, that a certain m
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