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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
vel, barefoot. August 6th Breckinridge's corps, consisting of his own and Wharton's small divisions, passed by us, and recrossed the Potomac. General B. was formerly Vice-President of the United States, and is a magnificent looking man, weighing over two hundred pounds. He wears a heavy moustache, but no beard, and his large piercing blue eyes are really superb. Rodes' and Ramseur's divisions also crossed to the Virginia side, wading the river again. We marched to the vicinity of Hedgesville, on a mountain road, and camped for the night. August 7th Marched through Martinsburg, and to our former camp at Bunker Hill. August 8th and 9th Spent these two days resting, but in momentary expectation of an order to fall in. August 10th Order to fall in received, and we left camp, marched six miles towards Winchester, formed line of battle, and slept on our arms all night. August 11th Went to Winchester and formed line of battle. Then Battle's brigade was order
onel R. H. Chilton, A. A. General, Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel,--I have the honour to report that on the 9th inst., in compliance with instructions from the Commanding General, Army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1800 men and four pieces of horse-artillery, under command of Brig.-Gen. Hampton and Cols. W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darkesville at 12 o'clock, and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped for the night. At daylight next morning (October 10th) I crossed the Potomac at McCoy's (between Williamsport and Hancock) with some little opposition, capturing two or three horses of the enemy's pickets. We were told here by the citizens that a large force had camped the night before at Clear Spring, and were supposed to be en route for Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock (known as the National Road). He
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 18: Fredericksburg. (search)
, collected the latter into heaps two or three feet high, and laying the bars of iron across the top, set fire to the whole. The heat of such log-heaps in full blaze rendered the iron red-hot, and the weight of the projecting ends warped and bent it into every imaginable shape. But as though this were not enough, the soldiers, seizing the great bars while heated in the middle, bent them around trees, and amused their ingenuity in reducing them to every fantastic use. From the hamlet of Hedgesville, west of Martinsburg, to a point near Harper's Ferry, the track was thus utterly destroyed, for a distance of thirty miles; and after the work was done, Jackson rode deliberately over the whole, to assure himself of its completeness. At the end of the month, the corps moved toward the Shenandoah river and the Blue Ridge, and encamped upon the road from Charlestown to Berryville. The purpose of this change was to watch McClellan, who had now begun to cross the Potomac below Harper's F
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 25: retreat to Virginia. (search)
e of intercepting that force, while another division should hold it in front. We moved that night to the foot of the mountain at Guardstown, and crossing early next morning (the 21st) through Mills' Gap, marched down Back Creek to the rear of Hedgesville, where we found that the force had made its escape by retiring the night before. The division was then moved across the mountain through Hedgesville and camped. During the night I received orders to move up the valley for the purpose of crosHedgesville and camped. During the night I received orders to move up the valley for the purpose of crossing the Blue Ridge, and next day (the 22nd) I marched to Bunker Hill. On the 23rd I passed through Winchester to the Opequon on the Front Royal road, being joined that day by the 13th Virginia Regiment. General Ewell, who had preceded me with Rodes' and Johnson's divisions, had that day been engaged with a heavy force which came through Manassas Gap, which he moved out to meet, near the Gap, as he was moving past Front Royal, and he sent at night to inform me that he would retire up the Lu
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
arket, 114 Haynesville, 283, 383, 384 Hays, General, 5, 7, 8, 17-20, 23-25, 28, 107, 114-124, 126, 129-131, 136, 139, 141, 143, 150, 152, 158, 171, 175-77, 179, 180, 188, 202-04, 206, 208, 210, 211, 219, 221, 222, 226-27, 229, 230, 232-34, 239, 241-43, 247, 248-49, 251-53, 257, 259, 267-69, 271-76, 307, 310, 311-315, 319, 320, 322, 345-46, 351, 374, 478 Hazel River, 106 Hazel Run, 167-69, 191, 194, 205, 207, 211, 220-24, 227-30, 233 Hazelwood, 184 Hedgeman's River, 108 Hedgesville, 284 Heidlersburg, 263-64, 266-68 Heintzelman, General (U. S. A.), 32, 131 Herbert, Colonel, 241, 243, 251 Heth, General, 236, 352-54, 356, 358, 363 Higginbotham, Major J. C., 125 Highland County, 459 Hill, Colonel, 24 Hill, General A. P., 76-77, 86, 93, 98, 99, 100, 102-03, 119, 123-29, 133, 135-39, 150, 155, 158, 162-64, 166, 170-72, 176, 179, 188, 195, 211-17, 236-37, 253, 263, 266, 269, 270-71, 273, 275, 278, 281-83, 285, 302-04, 307, 316, 322, 324, 326, 343-44,
tured a train of thirty wagons, of the Fifth and Ninth Illinois cavalry, near Helena, Ark., and took several prisoners.--The Fourteenth regiment of Vermont volunteers, under the command of Colonel W. S. Nichols, passed through Springfield, Mass., en route for the seat of war.--Springfield Republican. A skirmish took place between the Union and rebel pickets in the vicinity of Nashville, Tenn., terminating in a retreat of the Unionists to their intrenchments at Nashville, with some loss.--The British brig Robert Bruce, of Bristol, England, Captain Muir, was this day captured off Shallotte Inlet, N. C., by the United States gunboat Penobscot, while attempting to run the blockade.--Two squadrons of the Fourth Pennsylvania cavalry, under the command of Captain Duncan, made a reconnaissance to-day in the vicinity of Hedgesville, Va. Captain Duncan drove the rebel pickets into the town, and then charged the main body, routing them and taking nineteen prisoners, including three officers.
ras, in latitude 27° 57′, longitude 83° 9′.--an entire company of thirty-seven men and three officers, belonging to Gillmore's rebel battalion,was captured near Hedgesville, Va. Day before yesterday, Colonel L. D. Pierce, commanding the forces at Martinsburgh, was informed that Gillmore and his battalion were in the habit of holdineported the enemy in sight, and a citizen immediately afterward reported a force, numbering from forty to sixty, concealed in the mountains, some two miles from Hedgesville — their intention being to remain there during the day, and burn Back Creek bridge, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to-night. Colonel Pierce at once despatennsylvania cavalry, under Captain George W. Henrie, on the Pughtown road, and another of fifty, of the First New York, under Captain Richard Pendegrass, on the Hedgesville road; the one to flank them on the right, the other on the left. This they did, forming a junction, and very cunningly arranging their lines so as to form two
the cavalry. Captain Prendergast, accompanied by the scout, reconnoitred, unseen, the position of the rebels, and judiciously posted his cavalry force where they would entirely cut off every avenue of escape. He directed Captain Henry, with the men of the Twelfth, to occupy the road running by what is known as the Old Stone Church, and himself and men held the main road through Tomahawk — infantry, in the mean time, by his directions, moving upon the bushwhackers from the direction of Hedgesville, with orders to dislodge them from the mountain ravine. The infantry acted promptly. It was a complete surprise — a coup daetat; the graybacks were thunderstruck by the unexpected presence and sudden onset of the boys in blue. Those of them who could get to their horses sprang into their saddles, and, with accelerated speed, fled from the ravine, only to encounter the New-York and Pennsylvania boys, who met them with sabre in hand. Others left their horses behind them and took to th
A. A. General Army Northern Virginia: Colonel: I have the honor to report that on the ninth instant, in compliance with instructions from the commanding general army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania, with a cavalry force of one thousand eight hundred men and four pieces of horse-artillery, under command of Brig.-Gen. Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at twelve M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped for the night. At daylight next morning (October tenth) I crossed the Potomac at McCoy's (between Williamsport and Hancock) with some little opposition, capturing some two or three horses of the enemy's pickets. We were told here by citizens that a large force had been camped the night before at Clearspring, and were supposed to be en route to Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we had reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock, (known as the National
into town, the only position in which it was available. Placing my guns in position here, I ordered my wagons to go by the Romney road (as I had agreed with Colonel Lee to do) to Darksville. The First North Carolina, with two guns, was sent as an escort for the wagons, and to hold the Winchester road, where the cross-road intersected it, in case I should have to fall back. After my wagons had all got off, and messages had been sent to bring in my pickets, (all of whom had to retire by Hedgesville, as the enemy had got completely in their rear,) I withdrew my two remaining guns from the town, as I was very unwilling to draw the fire of the enemy upon the village, and placed them in position on a hill commanding both the Winchester and Tuscarora and Romney roads, and between the two. All of the brigade, except the First North Carolina regiment and the squadrons on picket, was drawn up as a support to their guns on the Tuscarora road, in advance of the camp of the North Carolina and
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