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o be united the same day at Hainesville, the location of the rebels. Owing to the danger and difficulty attending the fording at Dam No. Four, I placed all the force at Williamsport. My order of march for the second instant, is given in the accompanying circular. The advance crossed the Potomac at four A. M., all taking the main road to Martinsburg with the exception of Negley's brigade, which, about one mile from the ford, diverged to the right to meet the enemy, should he come from Hedgesville, to guard our right and to rejoin at Hainesville. About five miles from the ford the skirmishers in front and on the flank suddenly became engaged with the enemy posted in a clump of trees, at the same time their main force appeared in front sheltered by fences, timber, and houses. Abercrombie immediately deployed his regiments, (First Wisconsin and Eleventh Pennsylvania,) on each side of the road, placed Hudson's section, supported by the First troop Philadelphia City cavalry, in t
e the Army of the Potomac in position either to adopt the Fredericksburg line of advance upon Richmond or to be removed to the Peninsula if, as I apprehended, it were found impossible to supply it by the Orange and Alexandria Railroad beyond Culpeper. On the 27th of Oct. the remaining divisions of the 9th corps crossed at Berlin, and Pleasonton's cavalry advanced to Purcellville. The concentration of the 6th corps, delayed somewhat by intelligence as to the movements of the enemy near Hedgesville, etc., was commenced on this day, and the 1st corps was already in motion for Berlin. On the 28th the 1st corps and the general headquarters reached Berlin. On the 29th the reserve artillery crossed and encamped near Lovettsville. Stoneman's division, temporarily attached to the 9th corps, occupied Leesburg; Averill's cavalry brigade moved towards Berlin from Hagerstown; two divisions of the 9th corps moved to Wheatland, and one to Waterford. The 2d corps commenced the passage of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
credited. The cavalry crossed at the fords without serious molestation, bringing up the rear on that route by 8 A. M. on the 14th. To Baker's (late Hampton's) brigade was assigned the duty of protecting the Potomac from Falling Waters to Hedgesville. The other brigades were moved back towards Leetown, Robertson's being sent to the fords of the Shenandoah, where he already had a picket, which, under Captain Johnston of the North Carolina Cavalry, had handsomely repulsed the enemy in theird, but the recent rains had so swollen the Shenandoah that it was impossible to ford it, and cavalry scouting parties had to swim their horses over. In the interval of time from the 16th to the 22d of July, the enemy made a demonstration on Hedgesville, forcing back Baker's brigade. Desultory skirmishing was kept up on the front for several days with the enemy, while our infantry was engaged in tearing up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad near Martinsburg. Parts of Jones' brigade were also e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E. Bodes' report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
efore the infantry came up I ordered General Jenkins to move most of his force to the left of the town; to dismount it, and send it forward as skirmishers; to endeavor to get possession of the town, thus cutting off the enemy's retreat towards Hedgesville and Williamsport, and to report to me what force, if any, he discovered in and to the left of the town. At the same time Lieutenant-Colonel Carter was directed to take the best position for his artillery, to enable him to silence the opposing form than my limits will admit of, and to these you are respectfully referred. Skirmish at Manassas Gap. After recrossing the Potomac, with the exception of twenty-four hours spent in an ineffectual effort to strike the Federal force at Hedgesville, the division remained quietly in camp near Darkesville, Berkeley county, until the 22d of July, when it resumed the march up the Valley. Bivouacking at Winchester one night, the next afternoon found us, after a march of twenty-three miles, f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. (search)
lonel R. H. Chilton, A. A. General Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to report that on the 9th instant, in compliance with instructions from the Commanding General Army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1,800 and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped for the night. At daylight next morning (October 10th) I crossed the Potomac at McCoy's (between Williamsport and Hancock) with some little opposition, capturing two or three horses of the enemy's pickets. We were told here by citizens that a large force had camped the night before at Clear Spring, and were supposed to be en route to Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock (known as the National road). Here a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
be credited. The cavalry crossed at the fords without serious molestation, bringing up the rear on that route by 8 A. M. on the 14th. To Baker's (late Hampton's) brigade was assigned the duty of picketing the Potomac from Falling Waters to Hedgesville. The other brigades were moved back towards Leetown — Robertson's being sent to the fords of the Shenandoah, where he already had a picket, which, under Captain Johnston, of the North Carolina cavalry, had handsomely repulsed the enemy in thed; but the recent rains had so swollen the Shenandoah that it was impossible to ford it, and cavalry scouting parties had to swim their horses over. In the interval of time from the 16th to the 22d of July, the enemy made a demonstration on Hedgesville, forcing back Baker's brigade. Desultory skirmishing was kept up on that front for several days with the enemy, while our infantry was engaged in tearing up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad near Martinsburg. Parts of Jones' brigade were also
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
8 1367 301851 Ox Hill41612161226 116 518 14922 Harper's Ferry 4              4  Sharpsburg9434814  2 316  4 20794 Shepherdstown 15 226 116  10  4 371  Aggregate201415158311311211180 20106 793527 On our march to Manassas Junction we had nothing to eat, and were turned into fields of green corn like so many horses. We similarly dieted when we first entered Maryland. From Shepherdstown we went into camp at Bunker hill, and there remained until sent to North Mountain depot, near Hedgesville, to tear up the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. We did our work so thoroughly, that General Jackson complimented us, and ordered us back to Bunker hill to rest, while the balance of his command was destroying the road between Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry. We also helped to tear up the Winchester and Charlestown or Harper's Ferry road. We next camped at Castleman's Ferry, in Clarke county, where we did picket duty for some time. And then near Winchester,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
st before midnight my advance (Rodes's division) commenced crossing. The men had directions to sling their cartridge-boxes over their shoulders, but many rounds of ammunition were necessarily lost, as the water was up to their armpits the whole way cross, sometimes deeper. By 8 o'clock my whole corps was over, all fording except Hays's brigade, which was sent with the artillery to the pontoons. While in camp near Darksville, the enemy under Kelly were reported between Martinsburg and Hedgesville, protecting the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and occasionally skirmishing with Johnston's division, which was destroying the track. General Lee directed on the 21st an effort to be made to capture this force, said to be 6,000 strong. Sending Early's division to get in the rear through Mill's Gap and down North Creek, I joined Rodes to Johnson and marched against their front. Though these movements were made in the night of the 21st, the enemy heard of them through spies, and early on t
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, West Virginia, 1862 (search)
4th Infantry. Oct. 16-17: Reconnoissance from Harper's Ferry to CharlestownDELAWARE--2d Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--20th Infantry. MICHIGAN--7th Infantry. MINNESOTA--1st Infantry. NEW HAMPSHIRE--5th Infantry. NEW YORK--7th, 42d, 52d, 57th, 59th, 61st, 64th and 66th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--53d, 71st, 72d and 81st Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--Battery "A" 1st Light Arty. UNITED STATES--1st, 2d, 5th and 6th Cavalry; Battery "E" 4th Arty. Union loss, 1 killed, 3 wounded. Total, 4. Oct. 20: Skirmish, HedgesvillePENNSYLVANIA--4th Cavalry. Oct. 29: Skirmish, Ridgeville Road, near PetersburgILLINOIS--Battery "L" 1st Light Arty. (Section). PENNSYLVANIA--Ringgold Cavalry. Oct. 31: Skirmish near Falls Kanawha(No Reports.) Nov. 6: Skirmish, MartinsburgPENNSYLVANIA--12th Cavalry. Nov. 8-14: Expedition into Tucker County(No Reports.) Nov. 9: Capture of St. GeorgeWEST VIRGINIA--6th Infantry (Co. "B"). Nov. 9: Reconnoissance of RipponMAINE--6th Battery Light Arty. PENNSYLVANIA--Indpt. Batteries "E" an
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, West Virginia, 1863 (search)
ORK--10th Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--1st, 3d, 4th, 8th and 16th Cavalry. UNITED STATES--Battery "E" 1st Arty. Union loss, 8 killed, 72 wounded, 24 missing. Total, 104. July 17: Skirmish, North Mt. Station(No Reports.) July 18-19: Skirmishes near Hedgesville and MartinsburgILLINOIS--16th Cavalry (Co. "C"). OHIO--3d Indpt. Cavalry Company. PENNSYLVANIA--14th Cavalry, Washington County Cavalry Company. WEST VIRGINIA--1st (Co. "A") and 3d (Co. "C") Cavalry; Battery "G" Light Arty.; 3d and 8th Infantr Union loss, 1 wounded. Oct. 13: Skirmish, BurlingtonPENNSYLVANIA--La Fayette County Cavalry Company. Oct. 14: Skirmish, Salt Lick BridgeILLINOIS--16th Cavalry (Co. "C"). WEST VIRGINIA--4th Cavalry; 4th and 11th Infantry. Oct. 15: Skirmish, HedgesvilleNEW YORK--1st Cavalry. OHIO--116th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--14th Cavalry (Detachments). Oct. 16: Skirmish, CharlestownMAINE--5th Battery Light Arty. Oct. 18: Engagement, CharlestownMARYLAND--2d P. H. B. Cavalry (Co. "F"); 9th Infantry. MICHIGA
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