Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Huttonsville (West Virginia, United States) or search for Huttonsville (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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cross Laurel hill through Beverly and on to Huttonsville, with about 1,000 men, including 1 80 cavalield reported. General Garnett, reaching Huttonsville on the 14th, organized two regiments from t of Morgantown. Leaving three companies at Huttonsville, under Porterfield, to guard his line of coom northwest Virginia to Staunton by way of Huttonsville, from Huttonsville to Lewisburg on the KanaHuttonsville to Lewisburg on the Kanawha line, and between these towns to the Virginia Central railroad at Millboro. He really held the eutenant-colonel marched the command toward Huttonsville, and on receiving information that Garnett continued this movement on the 12th beyond Huttonsville. While Rosecrans was fighting in the gapere abandoned, the retreat was continued to Huttonsville, gathering up escaped soldiers, most of thee east. Hotchkiss and party, learning at Huttonsville that Scott had gone into camp six miles furictory. On the 16th, leaving a force at Huttonsville and on Cheat mountain, McClellan returned t
having been ordered to the Huntersville and Huttonsville road, mainly the brigade of Brig.-Gen. W. Whe Federal force on Cheat mountain and near Huttonsville. General Loring reached Monterey on the 22e and on Cheat mountain. Loring found at Huttonsville Col. George Maney's First Tennessee, Col. Rtwo days march to the enemy's position near Huttonsville; that beef cattle were abundant along the line of advance, and that so soon as Huttonsville should be reached, the road over Cheat mountain wouof Tygart's valley, from Valley mountain to Huttonsville, and other arrangements perfected, Loring abserved, the turnpike road from Monterey to Huttonsville could be reached on the top of that mountais tents on Valley river at the point on the Huttonsville road just below me. It was a tempting sightountain and Elkwater fortifications, and at Huttonsville and Beverly on their line of communication s in his district, from Belington, Beverly, Huttonsville and Elkwater, and joined them with those at[4 more...]
winter. On the 9th, crossing Greenbrier river and the Cheat mountains and river, he encamped at Stipe's, near the western foot of Cheat mountain, not far from Huttonsville. On the 10th, marching through Huttonsville and down Tygart's valley, he attacked the Federal camp, that night, at Beverly, having proceeded from HuttonsvilleHuttonsville and down Tygart's valley, he attacked the Federal camp, that night, at Beverly, having proceeded from Huttonsville on byways east of the Tygart's Valley river, and thus was enabled to attack the enemy's camp in the rear, turning its fortifications, which were constructed with reference to an attack from Parkersburg on the west to Beverly. Just before crossing Files creek, on the north side of which was the encampment of the Eighth and ThirtyHuttonsville on byways east of the Tygart's Valley river, and thus was enabled to attack the enemy's camp in the rear, turning its fortifications, which were constructed with reference to an attack from Parkersburg on the west to Beverly. Just before crossing Files creek, on the north side of which was the encampment of the Eighth and Thirty-fourth Ohio volunteer infantry, General Rosser divided his command into two portions—the Eighth Virginia mounted infantry, commanded by Colonel Cooke moved to the left and attacked the eastern side of the Federal camp, interposing itself between that camp, which was just to the north of Beverly, and its fortifications, thus preve
the State senate, and sat in the Fiftieth, Fifty-first and Fifty-second Congresses as representative of the Eighth Virginia district. He died at Alexandria, October 15, 1891. Brigadier-General R. D. Lilley Brigadier-General R. D. Lilley entered the Confederate service in the spring of 1861 as captain of the Augusta Lee Rifles, a volunteer company, which marched through the mountains under Col. J. M. Heck, after the battle of Philippi, to recruit the forces in western Virginia. At Huttonsville, General Garnett ordered two regiments to be formed from the volunteer and militia organizations, and the Rifles was assigned to the Twenty-fifth Virginia infantry, under Colonel Heck. This regiment occupied Rich mountain, and there Captain Lilley, in command of his company, took part in the defense of Camp Garnett. During the night retreat from that post, he and part of his company followed the lead of Major Hotchkiss, over the mountain, and reached Beverly in safety; but the remainder