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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
urg, nine miles, to procure a supply of shoes. Nearing this place, Pettigrew Map 11: positions July 1st: 8 to 10 A. M. Map 12: positions July 1st: 10:10 to 10:30 A. M. Map 13: positions July 1st: 3:30 P. M. Map 14: positions July 1st: about 4 P. M. discovered the advance of a large Federal force and returned to Cashtown. Hill immediately notified Generals Lee and Ewell, informing the latter that he would advance next morning on Gettysburg. Buford, sending Merritt's brigade to Mechanicstown as guard to his trains, had early on the morning of the 29th crossed into and moved up the Cumberland valley via Boonsboro' and Fairfield with those of Gamble and Devin, and on the afternoon of Tuesday, June 30th, under instructions from Pleasonton, entered Gettysburg, Pettigrew's brigade withdrawing on his approach. From Gettysburg, near the eastern base of the Green Ridge, and covering all the upper passes into the Cumberland valley, good roads lead to all important points between t
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
nd a battery of artillery were at once despatched in search and pursuit of this force, which eventually proved to be the main body of Stuart's cavalry. Having perfected his plans, General Meade issued to the army the order of march for the following day: See Map No. 2, position night of June 28. Headquarters army of the Potomac, Frederick, Md., June 28, 1863. Orders: The army will march to-morrow as follows: 4 A. M. The 1st Corps, Major General Reynolds, by Lewistown and Mechanicstown to Emmettsburg, keeping the left of the road from Frederick to Lewistown, between J. P. Cramer's Not shown on map. and where the road branches to Utica and Cregerstown, to enable the 11th Corps to march parallel to it. 4 A. M. The 11th Corps, Major General Howard, by Utica and Cregerstown to Emmettsburg. 4 A. M. The 12th Corps, by Ceresville, Ceresville not shown on map. Walkersville and Woodsborough, to Taneytown. 4 A. M. The 2d Corps, by Johnsville, Liberty and Union,
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
xty rounds of ammunition in the boxes and upon the person. Corps commanders will avail themselves of all the time at their disposal to familiarize themselves with the roads communicating with the different corps. By command of Major General Meade. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army of the Potomac, March 9, 1864. Official copy: Chas. E. Pease, A. A. G. C Gettysburg, June 30, 1863—10.30 P. M. The reserve brigade, under General Merritt, is at Mechanicstown, with my trains. General Pleasonton wrote he would inform me when he relieved it. To-day I received instructions saying it would picket towards Hagerstown and south. I am satisfied that A. P. Hill's corps is massed just back of Cashtown, about nine miles from this place. Pender's division of this (Hill's) corps came up to-day, of which I advised you, saying the enemy in my front was increased. The enemy's pickets (infantry and artillery) are within four miles of this place, at the
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
th Mountain passes: the one running farthest south, by way of New Windsor and Frederick, reaches Crampton's Gap; the next one, by way of Union, Middleburg, and Mechanicstown, the pass of Cavetown; the third, by way of Frizzellburg, Taneytown, and Emmettsburg, that of Waynesboroa; finally, the last, passing by Littlestown, Two Taverter having sent General Merritt, with his new command (the regular cavalry brigade) to watch the outlet of the Hagerstown road in the valley of the Monocacy at Mechanicstown, made a bold dash along the western slope of South Mountain in order to ascertain if the enemy had lingered on the borders of the Antietam on the left flank ofnd before Ewell, near Gettysburg, had passed to the second line on the Taneytown road. Merritt, with the regular cavalry brigade, had been hastily called from Mechanicstown; Kilpatrick, who followed Stuart as far as the neighborhood of Heidlersburg, had been ordered to fall back on Two Taverns; Gregg, who was at Westminster with h
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
anches off into the high road between Fairfield and Monterey, and descends on Ringgold by the passage of Riker's Gap. The first passage to the south goes from Mechanicstown to Hagerstown, crossing the principal chain at Harmon's Gap, above the village of Cavetown; the second connects Lewistown with Berlin, where it crosses the CatChambersburg, and has no other escort than Imboden's brigade in the Cumberland Valley, he directs his march toward Cavetown by way of the road which leads from Mechanicstown to Hagerstown. On reaching the culminating point of O'Eiler's Gap this road becomes divided, running in the direction of Leitersburg on the right and toward Srate at Middletown on the 7th. The one on the right, formed by the First, Second, and Sixth corps, skirts the foot of Catoctin Mountain by way of Emmettsburg, Mechanicstown, and Lewistown, crossing this chain at Hamburg; the centre column, composed of the Fifth and Eleventh corps, after reaching Emmettsburg by a by-road, moves thr
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the editor (search)
Middletown, via Boonsboroa, Cavetown, and Monterey Springs, to near Fairfield; and Merritt's reserve cavalry brigade, of the same division, from Middletown to Mechanicstown; Gregg's (Second) cavalry division, from New Market and Ridgeville to Westminster, and Kilpatrick's (Third) cavalry division, formerly Stahel's division, from d the field of Gettysburg. Gamble's and Devin's brigades of Buford's cavalry division marched from Gettysburg to Taneytown, and Merritt's reserve brigade from Mechanicstown to Emmettsburg. July 3. Battle of Gettysburg, Third Day.—Gamble's and Devin's brigades, of Buford's cavalry division, moved from Taneytown to Westminster The First corps marched from Emmettsburg to Hamburg; the Second corps, from Two Taverns to Taneytown; the Third corps, from Gettysburg, via Emmettsburg, to Mechanicstown; the Fifth corps, from Moritz Cross-roads, via Emmettsburg, to Utica; the Sixth corps, from Emmettsburg to Mountain Pass, near Hamburg; the Eleventh corps, fro