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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
s expected he would meet Sheridan. That officer was again to cut loose from the army, and, after tearing up the Virginia Central near Gordonsville, to cooperate with Hunter, if practicable. In obedience to instructions Sheridan, with the divisions of Torbert and Gregg, numbering, exclusive of non-combatants, about eight thousand men, started (June 7th) from New Castle on the Pamunkey, crossed that river on pontoons, moved rapidly via Aylett's, Polecat Station, Chiles-burg, New Market, Mt. Pleasant, Young's Bridge, crossed the South Anna at Becker's Store, and bivouacked on the evening of the 10th at Buck Childs's, three miles from Trevilian Station. On the march, whenever the column passed near the railroad it was cut in several places. The weather was hot, and the roads heavy with dust, causing the weaker horses to drop out; in all cases where this occurred the disabled animals were shot by the rear-guard. As on the Richmond raid, transportation and supplies had been reduced to
Short and simple as it was, it contained the germ of the entire anti-Slavery movement. A weekly journal entitled The Philanthropist was soon after started at Mount Pleasant by Charles Osborne; and Lundy, at the editor's invitation, contributed to its columns, mainly by selections. In a few months, he was urged by Osborne to join him in the newspaper enterprise, and finally consented to do so, removing to Mount Pleasant. Meantime, he made a voyage to St. Louis in a flat-boat to dispose of his stock of saddlery. Arriving at that city in the fall of 1819, when the whole region was convulsed by the Missouri Question, he was impelled to write on the side thstablishment, and it had been removed to Jonesborough, Tennessee, where his newspaper took the title of The Emancipator. Lundy removed, as he had purposed, to Mount Pleasant, and there started, in January, 1821, a monthly entitled The Genius of Universal Emancipation. the commenced it with six subscribers; himself ignorant of prin
ed lying between the armies were removed and the dead buried. Next day, June 7. our left was extended to the Chickahominy, finding the enemy in force opposite Sumner's and Bottom's bridges; while Sheridan was dispatched with two divisions of cavalry around Lee's left, to tear up the Virginia Central railroad in his rear, which he did: crossing the Pamunkey at Aylett's, breaking the Fredericksburg road at Chesterfield station, and thence pushing over the North Anna by Chilesburg and Mount Pleasant, over the upper branches of the North Anna, June 10. striking the Central railroad at Trevilian's, routing a body of Rebel horse, under Wade Hampton, that interfered with his operations, and breaking up the road nearly down June 12. to Louisa C. H.; but, soon finding the Rebels too numerous and pressing, he retraced his steps to Trevilian's, where he had a sharp, indecisive, sanguinary fight, and then drew off; making his way to Spottsylvania C. H., and thence by Guiney's station t
ach they had fled precipitately, too much frightened to offer any resistance to our advance. On we went, stopping only at long intervals for a few moments' rest and refreshment for ourselves and horses. We proceeded rapidly, passing through Mount Pleasant, Markham, and Childsburgh. Up to this time we had followed up the trail of our advanced five hundred, but at Mount Pleasant we diverged from the main road to go to Childsburgh, whilst our advance had taken the road leading to Frederickshall,Mount Pleasant we diverged from the main road to go to Childsburgh, whilst our advance had taken the road leading to Frederickshall, with the understanding that they were to join us at Hanover Junction. At Childsburgh we struck for Beaver Dam Station, on the Virginia Central Railroad. When we had proceeded about two miles from Childsburgh, we suddenly came upon a rebel engineer train and captured the whole thing, engineers and all. They were going to Fredericksburgh, and had much valuable apparatus with them. About three o'clock P. M., we dashed into Beaver Dam Station, captured. the telegraph apparatus and operator, and
y, under command of Major Russell, two battalions Second Michigan cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell, our forces thus united making one thousand and five, rank and file, officers, servants, etc., all told. After feeding, here on secesh hay, we proceeded to the Red Bird Fork of the Kentucky River; following up said river to its head-waters, we crossed through War Gap to the Pine Mountain; crossed said mountain, and at its foot struck the Cumberland River; followed up this river to Mt. Pleasant, tie county-seat of Harlan County; this is one of the county-seats, and is certainly worth describing. It consists of a court-house, with the gable end out; a log jail, the logs so far apart that a man could crawl between them ; half a dozen log huts inhabited by white people, who refused a drink of water to a Union soldier. Leaving the Cumberland River here, we followed up Martin's Creek to the foot of Cumberland Mountain. At four o'clock P. M., Sunday, the twenty-eighth, we commenc
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
nt, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, Scammon's Division, Dept. of West Virginia, to December, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division Dept. West Virginia, to April, 1864. Artillery, 2nd Infantry Division Dept. West Virginia, to July, 1864. Reserve Division, Harper's Ferry, W. Va., to April, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division Dept. West Virginia, to July, 1865. Service. Duty at Pendleton, Ohio, till July, 1861. Ordered to the Kanawha Valley, W. Va., July 10. March from Mount Pleasant to Charleston, W. Va., July 11-25. Action at Scarry Creek July 17. Tyler Mountain July 24. Capture of Charleston July 25. Advance to Gauley July 26-August 1. Moved to Camp Piatt, arriving August 25. Gauley Bridge August 28. Boone Court House September 1. Peytonia September 12. Moved to Raleigh September 20-27. Chapmansville September 25. Return to Gauley, arriving there October 10. Cotton Hill October 13. Operations in Kanawha Valley October 19-Nove
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
. Waterloo Bridge August 23-25. Gainesville August 28. Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington till September 30. Moved to Clarksburg, W. Va., September 30-October 1. Duty at Clarksburg, Mount Pleasant, and outpost duty at Buckhannon, Centreville, Bulltown, Sutton and Glenville till April, 1863. Regiment mounted, Janelew, May 5. Huttonsville July 4. Near Hedgeville and Martinsburg July 18-19. Averill's Raid through Hardy, Pendle3. Freeman's Ford August 22. Sulphur Springs August 23-24. Waterloo Bridge August 25. Gainesville August 28. Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. In the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till September 29. Moved to Mount Pleasant, W. Va., September 29-October 9. Outpost duty at various points in District of West Virginia, till June, 1863. Skirmish, Gilmer County, W. Va., April 24, 1863. Regiment mounted at Bridgeport June, 1863. Moved to Grafton June 17. Be
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
tle of Second Manassas, Boonsboro and Sharpsburg, was with the army at Winchester after the return to Virginia, and went with his regiment to Kinston, N. C., when Foster made his raid from New Bern. Next he went with the Twenty-third to Wilmington and from there to Mississippi, when Gen. Joseph Johnston was trying to concentrate a force for the relief of Vicksburg. He was in the skirmishes under Jackson, was then sent to Isle of Hope, near Savannah, Ga., and soon after was stationed at Mount Pleasant, near Charleston. He was appointed brigade quartermaster November 13, 1863, with rank of major, his commission being signed by James A. Siddon, secretary of war. He was assigned in this capacity to the brigade of Gen. R. S. Ripley. On the evacuation of Charleston he had charge of the embarkation of troops at Fort Moultrie. He went with his brigade to join Gen. Joe Johnston in North Carolina and was present at the battle of Averasboro. After the surrender of the army under Johnston h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
Augusta county—and Augusta county was then an empire stretching from the Blue Ridge mountains to the Mississippi river—in 1749, Robert Alexander, a Scotch-Irish immigrant, who was a Master of Arts of Trinity College, Dublin, established there The Augusta Academy—the first classical school in the Valley of Virginia. Under his successor, Rev. John Brown, the academy was first moved to Old Providence, and again to New Providence church, and just before the Revolution, for a third time, to Mount Pleasant, near Fairfield, in the new county of Rockbridge. In 1776, as the revolutionary fires were kindling, there came to its head as principal William Graham, of worthy memory, who had been a class-mate and special friend of Harry Lee at Princeton College; and at the first meeting of the trustees after the battle of Lexington, while Harry Lee was donning his sword for battle, they baptized it as Liberty Hall Academy. Another removal followed, in 1777, to near the old Timber-Ridge church; b<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid against Richmond. (search)
ts enemy moving. Gregg moved to front Thursday. Tuesday whole army paid off, and prepared to march last night. Kilpatrick receiving marching orders. Three days rations passed Sheppard's, near Madden's, supposed to be coming to Ely's Ford. Part of Second Corps on same road. Whole army seems in motion. Sutlers and women ordered to rear. Acknowledge receipt of this. At 12:30 I sent the following message to General Stuart: Citizens report to General Young a Yankee cavalry brigade at Mount Pleasant, moving towards Central Road. No reports from pickets. Not hearing from General Stuart, at 10:30 P. M. the following message was sent to him: Enemy were at Beaver Dam at seven o'clock. North Carolina brigade has moved down with artillery. Have ordered Maryland cavalry to join me. Young at Spotsylvania Courthouse. Have received nothing from you. These dispatches gave all the information I had received of the movements of the enemy. As soon as I could learn what direction he had taken
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