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ents. It re-enlisted and received a large number of recruits, taking the field in 1864 with 882 enlisted men present. In the various actions at Drewry's Bluff it lost 15 killed, 65 wounded, and 127 captured; at Cold Harbor, the casualties were 12 killed, 92 wounded, and 6 missing, Major Joseph H. Converse receiving a mortal wound. The Regiment was then in the Eighteenth Corps. Colonel Stedman was killed in the trenches before Petersburg. In December, 1864, the regiment was transferred to Ripley's (1st) Brigade, Devens's (3d) Division, Twenty-fourth Corps. Fourteenth Connecticut Infantry. Carroll's Brigade — Gibbon's Division--Second Corps. (1) Col. Dwight Morris. (2) Col. Theodore G. Ellis; Bvt. Brig. Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff   1 1   1 1 17 Company A 2 11 13   18 18 180   B 2 21 23   16 16 163   C 1 16 17
Doc. 78.-Henry A. Wise's proclamation. Ripley, Va., July 6, 1861. To the true and loyal citizens of Virginia on all the Ohio border, and more particularly to those of Jackson County, I would earnestly appeal to come to the defence of the Commonwealth, invaded and insulted as she is by a ruthless and unnatural enemy. None need be afraid that they will be held accountable for past opinions, votes, or acts, under the delusions which have been practised upon the Northwestern people, if they will now return to their patriotic duty and acknowledge their allegiance to Virginia and her Confederate States, as their true and lawful sovereigns. You were Union men, so was I, and we held a right to be so until oppression and invasion and war drove us to the assertion of a second independence. The sovereign State proclaimed it by her Convention, and by a majority of more than 100,000 votes at the polls. She has seceded from the old and established a new Confederacy. She has commande
Doc. 233. attack on Ripley, Va., December 19, 1861. The following account is given in the Wheeling Press of December 27: Ripley, Jackson Co., Va., December 20, 1861. Colonel D. Frost: It is with pain and regret that I have to inform yRipley, Jackson Co., Va., December 20, 1861. Colonel D. Frost: It is with pain and regret that I have to inform you that on last night about nine o'clock our town was visited by a band of Moccasin Rangers, and the town completely taken possession of. They numbered about twenty-five, all well armed. A gentleman of the name of Dr. O. G. Chase came here some eigh in H. Progler's upper house, gathered up his men and went off to Cottageville, saying that he would hold the citizens of Ripley responsible if the arms, &c., were taken out or molested, when at the same time he had rendered the citizens entirely def Jackson C. H. Va., December 21, 1861. Colonel D. Frost: sir: On the night of the 19th the Moccasin Rangers came into Ripley and took all the United States arms and ammunition that Dr. Chase had here recruiting for the Tenth regiment, (J. Boheve'
n along the front and left flank of the enemy's position, while from the creek to the battery was covered with abattis. The position was most formidable. The assault was made by Pender's brigade, of A. P. Hill's division, on the right, and by Ripley's brigade on the right in front. Gen. Pender's brigade had been thrown out in advance, in observation on the enemy's left, when Ripley's brigade coming up, Gen. D. H. Hill ordered two of Gen. Ripley's regiments — the Forty-fourth Georgia and theRipley's brigade coming up, Gen. D. H. Hill ordered two of Gen. Ripley's regiments — the Forty-fourth Georgia and the First North-Carolina--to operate on the right with Gen. Pender, while the Forty-eighth Georgia and the Third North-Carolina remained in front. Gen. Lee then ordered the battery to be charged. The attempt was made. They all moved forward to the attack together. They cleared the rifle-pits and gained the creek, within one hundred yards of the battery; but there was still the creek and the abattis to cross. The fire of shot, shell, canister and musketry from the enemy's works was, meanwhile
s. On Monday our corps moved to Ox Hill, between Chantilly and Fairfax Court-House, where, in the afternoon, we had, under a driving thunder-storm, a smart but undecisive fight with three divisions of the enemy. In it were killed Generals Kearny and Stevens, valuable officers, both worth the battle. Thus the corps fought six days out of seven, after enormous marches. On Wednesday, the third instant, we marched to Dranesville; on Thursday to Leesburgh, where we met D. H. Hill's corps, Ripley's division, and perhaps others. On yesterday the army crossed the Potomac, D. H. Hill a little earlier in the day than we, and at a different ford. We marched till half-past 12 last night; started to-day before day, and reached this town by one P. M., or earlier. It is twenty-four miles from Leesburgh, and within eighteen of Pennsylvania. Of the scene at the passage of the Potomac I have not time to speak, nor of the battle-field of Leesburgh. Saunders, coming on in an independent way,
s. On Monday our corps moved to Ox Hill, between Chantilly and Fairfax Court-House, where, in the afternoon, we had, under a driving thunder-storm, a smart but undecisive fight with three divisions of the enemy. In it were killed Generals Kearny and Stevens, valuable officers, both worth the battle. Thus the corps fought six days out of seven, after enormous marches. On Wednesday, the third instant, we marched to Dranesville; on Thursday to Leesburgh, where we met D. H. Hill's corps, Ripley's division, and perhaps others. On yesterday the army crossed the Potomac, D. H. Hill a little earlier in the day than we, and at a different ford. We marched till half-past 12 last night; started to-day before day, and reached this town by one P. M., or earlier. It is twenty-four miles from Leesburgh, and within eighteen of Pennsylvania. Of the scene at the passage of the Potomac I have not time to speak, nor of the battle-field of Leesburgh. Saunders, coming on in an independent way,
ns, and arms. No further attempt was made upon the railroad. On the fifth of August our cavalry reported that the enemy had advanced in large force from Westover to Malvern Hill, and the next day the divisions of General Longstreet and McLaws, and that commanded by General Ripley, were moved down to the Long Bridge road. The enemy was found occupying the ground on which the action of July first was fought, and seemed ready to deliver battle in as great force as on that day. McLaws's and Ripley's divisions, reenforced by D. R. Jones's division, formed our left, Longstreet the right. The heat was intense, and the progress of the troops necessarily slow. Before the road was cleared of the enemy's pickets and the line of battle disclosed, the sun had almost set. Orders were given for our left wing to advance to Willis's Church, threatening the communication with Westover by extending well to the left, while two brigades of Longstreet's division were directed to advance upon Malvern
eek, found the bridge in flames, and a party of the enemy engaged in blockading the road on the other side. The Texan skirmishers gallantly crossed and engaged. Ripley's battery, being brought up, with a few rounds dispersed the enemy. The bridge being rebuilt, the troops crossed, and continued on the road to Pale Green Church on a commanding hill, straight to the front, supported by two lines of infantry. There was no cover, and the ground nearest the enemy was ploughed. Anderson's, Ripley's, and Rodes's brigades (Gordon commanding) had proceeded farther down the road, thus keeping under partial cover, and approaching somewhat nearer and on the righng of the twenty-seventh, when I was ordered, with my brigade, to relieve General Ripley and his command as soon as practicable. I immediately marched to General Ripley's position, which was about three fourths of a mile to the right of the road we travelled to Mechanicsville, and about the same distance from the town, and near B
er's. The junction was occupied without opposition, nothing of the enemy being seen beyond their mounted pickets, which retired as our own advanced. The whole of Ripley's command was advanced, forming line of battle across the road at the junction, and having brigades supporting each other, at Fisher's house, where my whole divisked in the woods in advance of the junction, and in position elsewhere to meet any emergency. On the seventh instant, there was some delay, owing to a portion of Ripley's troops not being supplied with rations. The advance was, however, commenced by a brigade being thrown forward, and occupying the vicinity of the creek, between the parsonage and Willis's Church — videttes and skirmishers occupying the parsonage and overlooking the battle-ground of July first. The other brigade of Ripley's and the whole command was ordered to march in easy supporting distance. A brigade also occupied Gatewood's to guard against any movement from the left. I then wrote
d North Carolina 11 D. H. Hill'sIverson's12th North Carolina 55 D. H. Hill'sIverson's5th North Carolina134 D. H. Hill'sRipley's4th Georgia167 D. H. Hill'sRipley's1st North Carolina 1515 D. H. Hill'sRipley's3d North Carolina 33 D. H. Hill'sRipleRipley's1st North Carolina 1515 D. H. Hill'sRipley's3d North Carolina 33 D. H. Hill'sRipley's44th Georgia112 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's6th Georgia 33 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's23d Georgia 22 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's27th Georgia 22 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's28th Georgia 88 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's2d North Carolina41721 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's4th NortRipley's3d North Carolina 33 D. H. Hill'sRipley's44th Georgia112 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's6th Georgia 33 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's23d Georgia 22 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's27th Georgia 22 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's28th Georgia 88 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's2d North Carolina41721 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's4th North Carolina42125 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's30th North Carolina 99 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's14th North Carolina 44 D. H. Hill'sArtilleryJeff Davis Artillery134 D. H. Hill'sArtilleryPage's Battery235 D. H. Hill'sArtilleryFry's Battery123 D. H. Hill'sColoRipley's44th Georgia112 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's6th Georgia 33 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's23d Georgia 22 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's27th Georgia 22 D. H. Hill'sColquitt's28th Georgia 88 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's2d North Carolina41721 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's4th North Carolina42125 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's30th North Carolina 99 D. H. Hill'sAnderson's14th North Carolina 44 D. H. Hill'sArtilleryJeff Davis Artillery134 D. H. Hill'sArtilleryPage's Battery235 D. H. Hill'sArtilleryFry's Battery123 D. H. Hill'sColonel Brown'sArtillery Regiment92130    26146172 Ewell'sHays's9th Louisiana5712 Ewell'sHays's8th Louisiana 66 Ewell'sHays's7th Louisiana 77 Ewell'sHays's6th Louisiana 1212 Ewell'sHays's5th Louisiana 88 Ewell'sHays'sLouisia
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