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Doc. 154.-expedition to Beaver Dam, Va. Official report of General Pope. headquarters of the army of Virginia, Washington, July 21, 1862. To Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: the cave received a full and correct account of the raid made by the Harris cavalry upon the depot at Beaver Dam, Hanover County, on Sunday morning last. From the best information it appears that they left ock, and came some fourteen miles of the way that night. Early Sunday morning they came on to Beaver Dam, where they arrived about eight o'clock. Here they found nothing to oppose them, and they at on to Richmond, by a servant named Dick, the property of Dr. Terrill of Hanover. Their stay at Beaver Dam was limited to some thirty minutes, at the end of which time the whistle of the up-train soundre would probably be some four or five hundred soldiers aboard, they hurriedly decamped. At Beaver Dam, and on the route to and from, they captured some six or eight prisoners of war, sick soldiers
deeds of daring done by each. I have the honor to be your obed't servant, Judson Kilpatrick, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding A National account. Fredericksburgh, July 24, 1869. Immediately upon the heels of the brilliant dash upon Beaver Dam, and before the exuberance and congratulations have ceased, another affair, equally daring in its conception and surpassingly successful, has instilled enthusiasm into the ranks and opened the eyes of rebeldom to the new order of things. As our cavalry returned from Beaver Dam on Sunday evening, it will be remembered that the rebels followed them up to within a short distance of Fredericksburgh. Finding that they could not overtake us, they proceeded down towards the Bowling Green road, where they surprised a party of the Third Indiana cavalry, capturing a lieutenant and seven men. On Tuesday evening, at four o'clock, Lieut.-Col. Kilpatrick started out in pursuit of the enemy, believed to be lurking in our vicinity, with one hundred
a was reached late at night; no halt was made, however, and the corps moved rapidly forward to Beaver Dam, on the Virginia Central Railroad. Captain Estes and Lieutenant Wilson, with a party of men, dnot take advantage of it. The picket at Ely's Ford knew nothing of it, and the column moved to Beaver Dam on the Central Railroad, before hearing a hostile shot. So skilfully managed, indeed, was the all night, no rest, for we had to get to the rear of Lee's forces. Monday, A. M., we reached Beaver Dam and cut the telegraph. We were now in Spottsylvania County, and created consternation among t fifteen feet of what is known as the dry trestling on the other side of the Chickahominy. At Beaver Dam they tore up some hundred yards or more of track, and burnt one or two unimportant railroad bual are especially due, for the prompt and vigorous manner in which they pursued the enemy from Beaver Dam to Richmond, and thence to the Pamunkey and down the peninsula, making repeated charges, captu
of Austin, which is just above the foot of Grand Cut Off, at sunrise. The only road from the river back near that place is one running some four miles due east from Austin, where it forks, one road then running south-ward along a lake known as Beaver Dam, and the other continuing eastward to the Coldwater. Our cavalry force under the old rebel-hunter of Missouri, Major Hubbard, at once pushed out on this road, turning downward along the lake. The infantry followed about a half-hour later. except directly out on the road, were indeed few. On one hand was an impassable bayou, and on the other an interminable canebrake. With great difficulty, we ascertained at the forks of the road I have mentioned, that both forces had taken the Beaver Dam road. It was then evident that the rebels intended not only to avoid our main force, but if possible, to attack and annihilate our little cavalry force, which, as their numbers were four to one, and the knowledge of the roads, swamps, etc., al
Central Railroad, and to advance at three A. M. on the twenty-sixth, and turn Beaver Dam. A. P. Hill was to cross the Chickahominy at Meadow Bridge, when Jackson's adntrenchments, and forced him to take refuge in his works, on the left bank of Beaver Dam, about a mile distant. This position was a strong one, the banks of the creeoods on its banks and destroying the bridges. Jackson being expected to pass Beaver Dam above, and turn the enemy's right, a direct attack was not made by General Hir point nearer the Chickahominy. Before they were completed, Jackson crossed Beaver Dam above, and the enemy abandoned his intrenchments and retired rapidly down theted camps. Battle of the Chickahominy. After repairing the bridges over Beaver Dam, the several columns resumed their march, as nearly as possible, as prescribetempted to cut Jackson's communications by destroying the Central Railroad at Beaver Dam. This force did no serious damage; but to prevent the repetition of the atte
General Ewell in the lead. After crossing Beaver Dam, we halted to dislodge a force of the enemy,posted it so as to shell the enemy's rear on Beaver Dam; after which they retired, leaving the routetrength and development on the other side of Beaver Dam, and had the banks lined with his magnificen fire, and succeeded in crossing the creek, (Beaver Dam,) and gaining the wood, dislodging the enemyour expectations, located on the far side of Beaver Dam, that my right was separated from them by a orning General Jackson moved directly across Beaver Dam. I took a circuitous route to turn that stro cover his left flank, he having formed, at Beaver Dam, a junction with the divisions which marchedmand sent to that vicinity after the raid at Beaver Dam, has, at my request, submitted a report, whiing to that place. I then proceeded on to Beaver Dam, and found the road had been repaired, readyot. No casualties. II. In the action at Beaver Dam, on the morning of the twenty-seventh, my re[4 more...]
t about his intentions; Fitz Lee's brigade, at Hanover Court-House, (where also were my headquarters,) and a battery of horse artillery to each. On the sixteenth of August, 1862, in pursuance of the commanding General's (R. E. Lee) secret instructions, I put this brigade on the march for the vicinity of Raccoon Ford, near which point the army under his command was rapidly concentrating. General Fitzhugh Lee was directed by me to proceed the next day from near Davenport's Bridge, opposite Beaver Dam, across to the vicinity of Raccoon Ford, where I promised to join him on that evening, (seventeenth.) I proceeded, on the cars, directly to the commanding General, whom I found near Orange Court-House. My command was now augmented by the addition of another brigade, Robertson's, and it was intended to concentrate the bulk of this force near Raccoon Ford, cross, and attack the enemy's communications in rear of Culpeper Court-House, simultaneously with a blow by the main body in front. I r
ctly to Madden's, where we pierced the enemy's column, while marching, and scattered it, taking possession of the road and capturing a number of prisoners, which enabled us to develop their strength and designs, as we captured prisoners from three army corps: the Eleventh, (Howard's,) Twelfth, (Slocum's,) and the Fifth, (Mead's,) and soon after learned that the column had marched direct for Germana Ford. These items were telegraphed to the commanding General. Colonel J. Lucius Davis, near Beaver Dam, had been telegraphed early that day to move his forces at once to occupy and hold the Rapidan Fords, but I had no assurance that the order would be obeyed with sufficient promptness to accomplish the object, and as there was no cavalry on the left flank of the main army, it was indispensably necessary to move round to get in front of the enemy moving down upon Fredericksburg, delay him as much as possible, and protect our left flank; besides, while in the execution of this design, I recei
. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union, 90 killed, 400 wounded; Confed., 500 killed, wounded, and missing. May 9-10, 1864: Cloyd's Mountain and New River bridge, Va. Union, 12th, 23d, 34th, and 36th Ohio, 9th, 11th, 14th, and 15th W. Va., 3d and 4th Pa. Reserves; Confed., Gen. A. G. Jenkins' command. Losses: Union, 108 killed, 508 wounded; Confed., 600 killed and wounded, 300 missing. May 9-25, 1864: Sheridan's Cavalry raid in Virginia, including engagements at Beaver dam Station, South Anna bridge, Ashland, and Yellow Tavern. Union, Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Stuart's Cav. Losses: Union, 50 killed, 174 wounded, 200 missing; Confed., killed and wounded not recorded, 100 captured; Confed., Maj.-Gen. J. E. B. Stuart and Brig.-Gen. Jas. B. Gordon killed. May 12-16, 1864: Fort Darling, Drewry's Bluff, Va. Union, Army of the James, Gen. B. F. Butler, commanding; Tenth Corps; Eighteenth Corps; Confed., Gen. Beauregard's command. Losse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cavalry operations in May, 1863--report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
directly to Madden's, where we pierced the enemy's column while it was marching, and scattered it, taking possession of the road and capturing a number of prisoners, which enabled us to develope their strength and designs, as we captured prisoners from three army corps--Eleventh (Howard's), Twelfth (Slocum's), Fifth (Meade's); and soon after learned that the column had marched direct for Germana ford. These items were telegraphed to the Commanding General. Colonel J. Lucius Davis, near Beaver Dam, had been telegraphed early that day to move his force at once to occupy and hold the Rapidan fords, but I had no assurance that the order would be obeyed with sufficient promptness to accomplish the object; and as there was no cavalry on the left flank of the main army, it was indispensably necessary to move around, get in front of the enemy moving down upon Fredericksburg, delay him as much as possible, and protect our left flank. Besides, while in the execution of this design, I receiv
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