hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 2 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Algerine (California, United States) or search for Algerine (California, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
Smith was so much interested in the lecture that he sent fifty dollars to Joshua Leavitt, with a view to supplying a copy to every professional man in New England. It gives an account of the efforts of European governments and our own to abolish Algerine slavery, of the experiences of captives, their heroic endeavors to escape, and the generous sympathies which their cause inspired in Christian nations. It abounds in references to authorities and extracts from them, of which many must have beenimulate antislavery opinion; but no one had ventured so far in this direction as Sumner now went in this lecture. It drew attention to the geographical analogies between the African and the American slaveholding regions, and to the incidents of Algerine slavery, which none could fail to recognize as belonging also to American slavery. What was said of escapes from the former applied equally well to the fugitive slaves from the Southern States, in whose behalf there was at the time an intense i