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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
o yield his stronghold at Kenesaw. After the assault of the 27th June it was determined to move toward our right, at the same time advancing that flank, a movement which it was supposed would result in the evacuation by the enemy of all ground north of the Ohattahoochee except his bridge-head at the railroad crossing. Receiving instructions from General Sherman, commanding, I made a personal reconnaissance of the ground upon our right as far as our extreme cavalry outposts, at or near Anderson's Mill or Olley's Creek, and immediately upon my return and report the Army of the Tennessee was put in motion. No sooner was this movement developed than the enemy, on the night of the 2d and morning of the 3d of July, evacuated his position at Kenesaw and in front of Marietta, and we took position, the troops moving right on in pursuit. Contrary to expectation and information, we found that the enemy intended to make a stand upon a line from Ruff's Station (Neal Dow) to Ruff's Mill, the fl
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 8 (search)
er corps were directed to move south by roads which would not separate them by distances of more than four miles. It appears to have been about midday of the 22d when Lee obtained information, through his cavalry, of our advance toward the North Anna. Hancock could not well have reached Hanover Junction before Lee, for Lee's route from the right of his intrenchments on the Po to Hanover Junction by the Telegraph road was about twenty-eight miles, while the route of Hancock's corps from Anderson's Mill to Hanover Junction via Bowling Green was about thirty-four miles; besides, as Hancock was advancing with a detached corps through an enemy's country and over unknown roads, he had to move with caution. Early in the afternoon General Grant decided to halt for a couple of hours, to be in easy communication with the troops that were following. He selected for the halt a plantation. which was beautifully situated on high ground, commanding a charming view of the valley of the Mattap
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Pauline Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. (search)
o return to Nashville, where, if false to her assumed character, he knew she would post the authorities concerning him. He therefore communicated with the nearest rebel scout post, and ere long she was placed under arrest, and transferred to Anderson's Mill, where she was disarmed and examined by the officer in charge. Finding that she had no pass, she was held as a prisoner of war, until her case could be reported to and acted upon by General Bragg. Moreover, she was not allowed to return to the house at Big Harpeth where she had left a satchel containing her rebel uniform and several articles of pressing use and value. Fortunately she had come across her horse on the road to Anderson's Mill, at the house of one De Moss, and claiming him at once, had taken possession of him, and as night closed in, she found herself again on the road, still a prisoner. About noon the next day, her guide stopped with her for refreshment at the house of a well-known physician, and while there, a