Your search returned 16 results in 6 document sections:

Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Capture of Port Gibson-Grierson's raid-occupation of Grand Gulf-movement up the Big Black- battle of Raymond (search)
. McPherson still had one division west of the Mississippi River, guarding the road from Milliken's Bend to the river below until Sherman's command should relieve it. On leaving Bruinsburg for the front I left my son Frederick, who had joined me a few weeks before, on board one of the gunboats asleep, and hoped to get away without him until after Grand Gulf should fall into our hands; but on waking up he learned that I had gone, and being guided by the sound of the battle raging at Thompson's Hill-called the Battle of Port Gibson-found his way to where I was. He had no horse to ride at the time, and I had no facilities for even preparing a meal. He, therefore, foraged around the best he could until we reached Grand Gulf. Mr. C. A. Dana, then an officer of the War Department, accompanied me on the Vicksburg campaign and through a portion of the siege. He was in the same situation as Fred so far as transportation and mess arrangements were concerned. The first time I call to min
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
arters, July 3. General Grant receiving General Pemberton's message. From a sketch made at the time. In his Personal Memoirs (C. L. Webster & Co.) General Grant says: On leaving Bruinsburg for the front I left my son Frederick, who had joined me a few weeks before, on board one of the gun-boats asleep, and hoped to get away without him until after Grand Gulf should fall into our hands; but on waking up he learned that I had gone, and being guided by the sound of the battle raging at Thompson's Hill — called the battle of Port Gibson-found his way to where I was. He had no horse to ride at the time, and I had no facilities for even preparing a meal. He therefore foraged around the best he could until we reached Grand Gulf. Mr. C. A. Dana, then an officer of the War Department, accompanied me on the Vicksburg campaign and through a portion of the siege. He was in the same situation as Fred so far as transportation and mess arrangements were concerned. The first time I call to min
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
the Confederates was continued. Meanwhile Porter was directed to assail Grand Gulf again, but on approaching it, on the 3d of May, he found it deserted. The Confederates there, flanked by the Nationals at Port Gibson, had joined with the defeated troops in their flight toward Vicksburg. The Nationals followed them closely to Hankinson's Ferry, on the Big Black, skirmishing and taking prisoners on the way. The National loss in the Battle of Port Gibson (called by some the Battle of Thompson's Hill) was 840 men, of whom 130 were killed and the remainder wounded. They captured three guns, four flags, and 580 prisoners. Grant at once made arrangements for a change of his base of supplies from Bruinsburg to Grand Gulf. In the mean time General Sherman, with the Fifteenth corps, had been operating on the Yazoo again. He had been left above Vicksburg, with the expectation of soon following McClernand and McPherson down the west side of the Mississippi. On the 28th of April Grant
16 1 24 25 174   G   17 17 1 39 40 182   H 1 15 16   27 27 195   I   17 17   26 26 178   K 1 15 16   20 20 166 Totals 9 166 175 3 293 296 1,809 Total of killed and wounded, 630; died of disease in Confederate prisons (previously included), 19. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Belmont, Mo. 18 Trenton, Tenn. 1 Fort Donelson, Tenn. 58 Canton, Miss. 1 Burnt Bridge, Tenn. 1 Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. 5 Grand Junction, Tenn. 1 Battle of Atlanta, Ga. 49 Thompson's Hill, Miss. 1 Siege of Atlanta, Ga. 3 Raymond, Miss. 2 Lovejoy's Station, Ga. 3 Champion's Hill, Miss. 8 March to the Sea 1 Vicksburg Assault, May 22, 1863 5 Wateree River, S. C. 1 Siege of Vicksburg, Miss. 13 Bentonville, N. C. 1 Jackson, Tenn. 1 Place unknown 2 Present, also, at Fort Henry, Tenn. Siege of Corinth; Tuscumbia River; Jackson, Miss.; Meridian Raid; Big Shanty, Ga.; Jonesboro, Ga.; Siege of Savannah; Salkahatchie, S. C.; Columbia, S. C. notes.--Organiz
Doc. 180.-battle of Port Gibson, Miss. General Grant's despatch. this battle is also known as the battle of Thompson's Hill. See General Grant's report of the siege and reduction of Vicksburgh, volume VII. rebellion record. Grand Gulf, via Memphis, May 7. To Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: we landed at B sir: I have the honor to herewith transmit the following report of the part taken by the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio volunteer infantry in the action of Thompson's Hill on the first instant, and with it a list of casualties: About five o'clock A. M. we were ordered to advance and take a position on the right of Lampher's bhe became courageous and dashing when the occasion required it. Both officers and men have my sincere thanks for their cheerful cooperation on the field of Thompson's Hill. I have the honor to be, General, Your obedient servant, M. M. Speigel, Col. Com'g One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment, O. V. I. Congratulatory orde
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
time with the crossing of the Delaware when the stream was gorged with ice? He will see also that on the night of Aug. 29, 1776, Washington withdrew from the front of the enemy and crossed over from Long Island to New York over a broad river. General Grant well remembers the passing of Vicksburg on a dark, foggy night in small steamers, old and unsafe, under the rain of shot and shell, as pouring down from the heavens. He will remember the march made the night before the battle of Thompson's Hill, where many troops were moved in the darkness of night. I myself marched my division from Hard times Landing to Bruinsburg, a distance of 8 miles, in the night-time— crossing the river in a boat at daylight— marched to the field of battle, and was on the field, a distance of 12 miles, by twelve o'clock that day. General Grant will remember that General McPherson's corps, after marching the greater part of the day to the sound of General Sherman's guns at the battle of Jackson, moved