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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 4 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Asinaria, or The Ass-Dealer (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 1 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts), chapter 5 (search)
ItRomulus recognised, Amulius killed. is said that the festival of the Lupercalia, which is still observed, was even in those days celebrated on the Palatine hill. This hill was originally called Pallantium from a city of the same name in Arcadia; the name was afterwards changed to Palatium. Evander, an Arcadian, had held that territory many ages before, and had introduced an annual festival from Arcadia in which young men ran about naked for sport and wantonness, in honour of the Lycaean Pan, whom the Romans afterwards called Inuus. The existence of this festival was widely recognised, and it was while the two brothers were engaged in it that the brigands, enraged at losing their plunder, ambushed them. Romulus successfully defended himself, but Remus was taken prisoner and brought before Amulius, his captors impudently accusing him of their own crimes. The principal charge brought against them was that of invading Numitor's lands with a body of young men whom t
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), BOOK 1, line 163 (search)
nd punishment now learn from this:—An infamous report of this unholy age had reached my ears, and wishing it were false, I sloped my course from high Olympus, and—although a God— disguised in human form I viewed the world. It would delay us to recount the crimes unnumbered, for reports were less than truth. “I traversed Maenalus where fearful dens abound, over Lycaeus, wintry slopes of pine tree groves, across Cyllene steep; and as the twilight warned of night's approach, I stopped in that Arcadian tyrant's realms and entered his inhospitable home:— and when I showed his people that a God had come, the lowly prayed and worshiped me, but this Lycaon mocked their pious vows and scoffing said; ‘A fair experiment will prove the truth if this be god or man.’ and he prepared to slay me in the night,— to end my slumbers in the sleep of death. So made he merry with his impious proof; but not content with this he cut the throat of a Molossian hostage sent to him, and partly softened h
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), BOOK 1, line 650 (search)
or shepherds.” Wherefore, Mercury sat down beside the keeper and conversed of various things—passing the laggard hours.— then soothly piped he on the joined reeds to lull those ever watchful eyes asleep; but Argus strove his languor to subdue, and though some drowsy eyes might slumber, still were some that vigil kept. Again he spoke, (for the pipes were yet a recent art) “I pray thee tell what chance discovered these.” To him the God, “ A famous Naiad dwelt among the Hamadryads, on the cold Arcadian summit Nonacris, whose name was Syrinx. Often she escaped the Gods, that wandered in the groves of sylvan shades, and often fled from Satyrs that pursued. Vowing virginity, in all pursuits she strove to emulate Diana's ways: and as that graceful goddess wears her robe, so Syrinx girded hers that one might well believe Diana there. Even though her bow were made of horn, Diana's wrought of gold, vet might she well deceive. “Now chanced it Pan. Whose head was girt with prickly pines, e
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 9, line 172 (search)
ow a fear before the Spanish shepherd's triple form? Nor did I fear the monstrous triple form of Cerberus.—And is it possible my hands once seized and broke the strong bull's horns? And Elis knows their labor, and the waves of Stymphalus, and the Parthenian woods. For this the prowess of these hands secured the Amazonian girdle wrought of gold; and did my strong arms, gather all in vain the fruit when guarded by the dragon's eyes. The centaurs could not foil me, nor the boar that ravaged in Arcadian fruitful fields. Was it for this the hydra could not gain double the strength from strength as it was lost? And when I saw the steeds of Thrace, so fat with human blood, and their vile mangers heaped with mangled bodies, in a righteous rage I threw them to the ground, and slaughtered them, together with their master! In a cave I crushed the Nemean monster with these arms; and my strong neck upheld the wide-spread sky! And even the cruel Juno, wife of Jove— is weary of imposing heavy toils,
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy VII: To His Mistress, whom he had beaten. By Henry Cromwell. (search)
ell. Come, if ye're friends, and let these hands be bound, Which could with impious rage a mistress wound: What more did Ajax in his fury do, When all the sacred grazing herd he slew? Or heOrestes who spared not her who gave him breath? So ill the son reveng'd his father's death! Then I had broke the most religious ties, Both to my parents and the deities: I tore (0 heav'ns!) her finely braided hair, How charming then look'd the disorder'd fair. So Atalanta in her chaise is drawn, Where the Arcadian beasts her empire own: So Ariadne, left upon the shore, Does all alone her lost estate deplore. Who would not then have rail'd and talk'd aloud (Which to the helpless sex might be allowed.) She only did upbraid me with her eye, Whose speaking tears did want of words supply. 0, that some merciful superior pow'r Had struck me lame before that fatal hour, And not have suffer'd me to pierce my heart So deeply, in the best and tend'rest part; To make a lady that subjection own, Which is not to t
Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb), Book XI, chapter 14 (search)
eir superior seamanship, introduced into Greece, and of which they appropriated the glory, giving out that they had discovered what they had really been taught. Tradition indeed says that Cadmus, visiting Greece in a Phœnician fleet, was the teacher of this art to its yet barbarous tribes. According to one account, it was Cecrops of Athens or Linus of Thebes, or Palamedes of Argos in Trojan times who invented the shapes of sixteen letters, and others, chiefly Simonides, added the rest. In Italy the Etrurians learnt them from Demaratus of Corinth, and the Aborigines from the Arcadian Evander. And so the Latin letters have the same form as the oldest Greek characters. At first too our alphabet was scanty, and additions were afterwards made. Following this precedent Claudius added three letters, which were employed during his reign and subsequently disused. These may still be seen on the tablets of brass set up in the squares and temples, on which new statutes are published
Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb), BOOK XV, chapter 41 (search)
It would not be easy to enter into a computation of the private mansions, the blocks of tenements, and of the temples, which were lost. Those with the oldest ceremonial, as that dedicated by Servius Tullius to Luna, the great altar and shrine raised by the Arcadian Evander to the visibly appearing Hercules, the temple of Jupiter the Stayer, which was vowed by Romulus, Numa's royal palace, and the sanctuary of Vesta, with the tutelary deities of the Roman people, were burnt. So too were the riches acquired by our many victories, various beauties of Greek art, then again the ancient and genuine historical monuments of men of genius, NERO BUILDS PALACE IN RUINS and, notwithstanding the striking splendour of the restored city, old men will remember many things which could not be replaced. Some persons observed that the beginning of this conflagration was on the 19th of July, the day on which the Senones captured and fired Rome. Others have pushed a curious inquiry so far as t
T. Maccius Plautus, Asinaria, or The Ass-Dealer (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 2 (search)
till you die. LEONIDA Where's our master, pray? LIBANUS The old one is at the Forum, the young one is here in-doors. LEONIDA That's enough for me then. LIBANUS Is it then that you've become a rich man? LEONIDA Leave off your raillery. LIBANUS I'll have done; for my ears are in expectation of what you are bringing me. LEONIDA Give your attention, that equally with myself you may learn this. LIBANUS I'm silent, then. LEONIDA You oblige me. Don't you remember that our chamberlain sold some Arcadian asses to a dealer of PellaDealer of Pella: Pella was a wealthy city of Macedonia, famed for the opulence of its merchants. It was the birthplace of Alexander the Great? LIBANUS I remember it; after that, what then? LEONIDA Well, he has sent some money here then to be paid to Saurea, for the asses; a young man has just now come who has brought this money. LIBANUS Where is this person? LEONIDA You think he ought to be devoured this instant, if you could see him. LIBANUS Aye, to be sure. But,