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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
s soon as possible after General Grant's arrival, preparations were made for the Army and Navy to move on up the Cape Fear River in concert. The effect of the surrender of Fort Fisher was a stampede in all the forts south of Federal Point. Lieutenant Cushing was sent in the gun-boat Monticello around to Fort Caswell, a strong fortification, built in former days by the United States engineers as a protection to the Western bar. Lieutenant Cushing found Fort Caswell blown up, the works at Bald Head destroyed, Fort Shaw blown up, and Fort Campbell abandoned. These works, mounting 9 and 10 inch guns and 150-pounder Armstrongs, completely commanded the channel, and were nearly out of reach of projectiles from the seaward. After an examination of the forts, Lieutenant Cushing hoisted the American flag on Fort Caswell and pushed on to Smithville, a heavily fortified point on Cape Fear River. The garrison departed as soon as the Monticello hove in sight, leaving everything in this hea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
morning breathed his last. For, thoa from out our bourne time and place, The flood may bear me far; I hope to see my pilot face to face, When I have crossed the bar. Along the coast may still be seen the storm-beaten hulls of some of the unfortunate ships, which, after weathering many a gale at sea, came to grief within sight of a friendly port. The Beauregard and the Venus lie stranded on Carolina Beach; the Modern Greece near New Inlet; the Antonica on Frying Pan Shoals; the Ella on Bald Head; the Spunkey and the Georgiana McCall on Caswell Beach; the Hebe and the Dee between Wrightsville and Masonboro. Two others lie near Lockswood's Folly Bar, and others whose names are also forgotten, lie half buried in the sands, where they may remain for centuries. John N. Maffitt. Among that devoted band of United States navy officers whose home and kindred were in the South at the outbreak of the war, and who resigned their commissions rather than aid in subjugating their native S
we hope the day is not far distant when he will be furnished with his farm in the South four by feent in size. Suspicious Movements about the North Carolina coast. On Saturday afternoon, says the Wilmington Journal, of Monday, a bark was seen from Camp Wvatt beating along the coast in a southwesterly direction, the wind being from the S. W.; and about 10½ o'clock at night, when opposite a point some two miles south of the camp, she sent up a rocket; She appeared to be making for Bald Head, and may have since come over the main bar. She kept close in, but not close enough to discover her nationality. Still another bark hove in sight yesterday at 3 o'clock P. M., running along the beach. She subsequently changed her course, running head on to the beach; while farther out to sea an object was seen, supposed to be a steamer in pursuit of the bark. By five o'clock, however, the object supposed to be a steamer had disappeared in the distance.--Our correspondent thinks that
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Religious exercises for the National Fast day. (search)
e hope the day is not far distant when he will be furnished with his farm in the South four by feeet in size. Suspicious movements about the North Carolina coast. On Saturday afternoon, says the Wilmington Journal, of Monday, a bark was seen from Camp Wyatt beating along the coast in a southwesterly direction, the wind being from the S. W.; and about 10½ o'clock at night, when opposite a point some two miles south of the camp, she sent up a rocket. She appeared to be making for Bald Head, and may have since come over the main bar. She kept close in, but not close enough to discover her nationality. Still another bark hove in sight yesterday at 3 o'clock P. M., running along the beach. She subsequently changed her course, running head on to the beach; while farther out to sea an object was seen, supposed to be a steamer in pursuit of the bark. By five o'clock, however, the object supposed to be a steamer had disappeared in the distance.--Our correspondent thinks that
them having gone under. It would seem that on Saturday night, or early Sunday morning, she was pursuing a vessel coming into New Inlet.--The pursued vessel run in between the shore and the "South Rock," The blockader, in trying to cut her off, must have touched on the rock hard enough to make a hole in her bottom. At any rate she sunk in five fathoms water. The chased vessel arrived safe at her wharf. It was quite dark at the time. On Saturday morning Col. Hedrick, commanding at Bald Head, struck one of the Yankee ships three or four times, and from the agitation on board, and the crowding of boats around her, it is quite probable that she, too, is in a precarious condition. It is said that the Yankee blockade off this harbor has been increased very recently by three additional vessels, among them the much-talked of double ended steamer Eutaw, the fastest vessel in the Yankee service, and, by their account, the fastest war vessel afloat. Both ends are alike, like a fe