hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 21 results in 7 document sections:

real meaning in Mexican politics, and were but the war-cries of ambitious leaders. Mexico was in revolutionary turmoil: Santa Anna, the legal President, intriguing for a dictatorship; Gomez Farias, the acting President, projecting radical reforms; and various military chiefs in open revolt; but in all he found a like jealousy, hatred, and ignorant contempt for the frontier, half-Americanized province of Texas. After waiting in vain from April till October, he wrote to the municipality of Bexar, advising the organization of a local State government, even should the Supreme Government of Mexico refuse its consent. This letter led to his arrest and strict imprisonment for many months; and, indeed, his detention did not end until September, 1835, when he returned to Texas after an absence of two years and a half. On May 13, 1834, Santa Anna dissolved Congress by force and assumed dictatorial powers, and in January, 1835, assembled a Congress which destroyed the Federal Constituti
ertaining the strength and composition of the enemy's forces, and how far they have been pushed on this side of the Rio Grande. Thus far I have been unable to raise the force I anticipated, the excitement of the false report of the investment of Bexar having subsided. I think it probable I shall have to advance with one company of forty men, or relinquish the undertaking, which I would not do were all the powers of Mexico in full array on our territory. [6Confidential.-Our Government wants energy and prudent foresight, which those intrusted with the liberties of a people should possess.] I leave to-morrow for the Navidad, thence for Bexar, thence — I will determine when I get there. Salutations to all friends, Prentice in particular. Very truly your friend, A. Sidney Jonston. The sentence marked s Confidential, in this letter, will not be considered incautious, or censorious, when it is remembered that it was addressed to a most intimate and trustworthy friend, not in Texa
. Fields and Hunter made a treaty with the Fredonian insurgents, in the winter of 1826; but a rival faction of the Cherokees murdered Hunter, and, led by Bowles, aided in putting down the revolt. Bowles became the war-chief of the Cherokees, and the leading spirit of the Texas Indians. The first concession by the Government to the Cherokees was an order, made August 15, 1831, to the local authorities, to offer them an establishment on a fixed tract of land, which the Political Chief at Bexar afterward reported that they had selected. When it is borne in mind that the chief motive of Mexico, in the colonization of Texas, had been to oppose the organization and valor of white men as a barrier between the restless and predatory Indians and interior Mexico, it seems a curious coincidence that the Government should begin to accord rights and privileges to savages, just when it was denying them to white men. The usurping Central Administration of Bustamante had, on April 6, 1830, ab
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
ssession of the town (May 18), and remained there until August, when he received reinforcements and orders from his government. Then, with more than 6,000 troops, he moved on Monterey, defended by General Ampudia, with more than 9,000 troops. It was a very strongly built town, at the foot of the great Sierra Madre. A siege commenced Sept. 21 and ended with the capture of the place on the 24th. General Wool had been directed to muster and prepare for service the volunteers gathered at Bexar, in Texas, and by the middle of July 12,000 of them had been mustered into the service. Of these, 9,000 were sent to reinforce Taylor. Wool went up the Rio Grande with about 3,000 troops, crossed the river at Presidio, penetrated Mexico, and, in the last of October, reached Monclova, 70 miles northwest of Monterey. He pushed on to Coahuila, where he obtained ample supplies for his own and Taylor's troops. General Taylor had agreed to an armistice at Monterey. This was ended Nov. 13, by orde
tates proclaimed......Oct. 4, 1824 Don Jose Antonio Saucedo appointed chief of the department of Texas, to reside at Bexar......Feb. 1, 1825 Henry Clay, United States Secretary of State, instructs the United States minister to endeavor to prpe, April 1, and adjourned......April 13, 1833 Law passed forming Texas into one judicial circuit and three districts— Bexar, Brazos, and Nacogdoches......April 17, 1834 Legislature of Coahuila and Texas, in session at Monclova, disperses on a 1835 First permanent newspaper in Texas, the Telegraph, established at San Felipe......October, 1835 Commandant at Bexar having furnished the corporation of Gonzales with a brass 6-pounder against the Indians in 1831, the Mexicans call it a l0 troops, leaves Monclova for Texas to drive out revolutionists and persons of foreign birth......Feb. 4, 1836 Town of Bexar taken by Mexicans, and the Texans retire to the Alamo......Feb. 21, 1836 Declaration of independence adopted by a co
haracter of the country, and the presence, in our rear, of a force of the enemy's cavalry, estimated at three times our own strength, prevented. I had also learned from a negro servant of Captain Cobb, of the Engineers, who commanded the train, that a large supply train of General Hood's, bound from Barton Station to Tuscumbia, was ahead. Early next morning (Sunday) I pushed on through Nauvoo, taking the Aberdeen road, which I knew would flank the train. I led a detachment from near Bexar across by a trail to head the train on the Cotton Gin road, and sent another, under Lieutenant-Colonel Lamborn. to follow it, and by ten P. M. had surprised it in camp a few miles over the State line, in Itawamba county, Mississippi. It consisted of one hundred and ten (110) wagons, and over five hundred mules. We burned the wagons, shot or sabred all the mules we could not lead off or use to mount prisoners, and started back. In one of the wagons was Colonel McCrosky, of Hood's infantry
haracter of the country, and the presence, in our rear, of a force of the enemy's cavalry, estimated at three times our own strength, prevented. I had also learned from a negro servant of Captain Cobb, of the Engineers, who commanded the train, that a large supply train of General Hood's, bound from Barton Station to Tuscumbia, was ahead. Early next morning (Sunday) I pushed on through Nauvoo, taking the Aberdeen road, which I knew would flank the train. I led a detachment from near Bexar across by a trail to head the train on the Cotton Gin road, and sent another, under Lieutenant-Colonel Lamborn. to follow it, and by ten P. M. had surprised it in camp a few miles over the State line, in Itawamba county, Mississippi. It consisted of one hundred and ten (110) wagons, and over five hundred mules. We burned the wagons, shot or sabred all the mules we could not lead off or use to mount prisoners, and started back. In one of the wagons was Colonel McCrosky, of Hood's infantry