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and day to collect a force able to cope in a fair field with Price's veterans and the Sons of Liberty, who were pledged to join him — a pledge which they but partially redeemed. For a week or so, the Rebels seemed to have the upper land; and this created a violent eruption of treasonable guerrilla raids and burnings in the pro-Slavery strongholds of central Missouri. Roseerans, in his official report, says: While Ewing's fight was going on. Shelby advanced to Potosi, and thence to Big river bridge, threatening Gen. Smith's advance; which withdrew from that point to within safer supporting distance of his main position at De Soto. Previous to and pending these events, the guerrilla warfare in north Missouri had been waging with redoubled fury. Rebel agents, amnesty-oath-takers, recruits, sympathizers, O A. K. s, and traitors of every hue and stripe, had warmed into life at the approach of the great invasion. Women's fingers were busy making clothes for Rebel soldiers out of
ompletely surrounded, they were finally obliged to surrender. Their loss is one killed (the orderly sergeant) and six wounded. The rebel loss is five killed and four wounded. Immediately after the capture the Federal prisoners were sworn by Jeff. Thompson himself not to take up arms against the Southern Confederacy, and were set at liberty. The rebels then proceeded to destroy the bridge, and having done so speedily retired. Mr. Kling states that he and the express messenger forded Big River a short distance below the site of the bridge, and walked to De Soto, a distance of nine miles, where they found a transportation train on which they proceeded to this city. They left at De Soto the five companies of the Eighth Wisconsin regiment, which were sent down the road Tuesday afternoon. When Mr. Kling left Pilot Knob Tuesday morning, an attack from the rebels was momentarily expected. Colonel Carlin was making every preparation in his power to give them a warm reception. His
knew whither. 'Twas enough we were going somewhere. Headed by the General and his staff, the brigade filed into its place and the dreary march commenced. Men were dainty at first where they planted their feet, but in half an hour puddles to the knee and mud that was shallower were sounded alike with indifference. At each small stream, as we passed through the low swampy wood, you could hear the question and reply along the ranks, This the Chickahominy, boys? Yes, here's New-Bridge! Big river, this! Let's jump it! but after a ten-mile march it became evident we were not going to Richmond at least by New-Bridge. The morning wore away and at noon the storm had departed with it. We were now some twelve miles from camp in a direction about north-westerly. The order of advance at a cross-roads here was changed a little. The Seventeenth New-York had led our brigade, followed by Griffin's battery, then the Forty-fourth New-York, Eighty-third Pennsylvania, Twelfth New-York, and
d two or three wounded. This brigade then formed a junction with General Woods's brigade, from Wright's Bridge, at Eden Station. General Hazen's division moved on to Black Creek, sending forward Colonel Oliver's brigade to the Cannoucher. The rest of the corps were encamped near Jenks's Bridge. The Seventeenth corps encamped in the vicinity of Station No. 3, ceasing to destroy the railroad after leaving Ogeechee Church. December 8. By the map there appeared to be a road between the Big and Little Ogeechee Rivers. As the enemy was reported in some force near the Twelve-Mile post, having a line of works in his front, I resolved to turn his position by sending two divisions of the Fifteenth corps down the west bank of the Ogeechee, which were to force a crossing of the Cannoucher, and sent forward sufficient force to break the Gulf Railroad, and secure, if possible, King's Bridge, over the Ogeechee, about a mile above the railroad, also to reconnoitre with one division betwee
December 8. By the map there appeared to be a road between the Big and Little Ogeechee Rivers. As the enemy was reported in some force near the Twelve-Mile post, having a line of works in his front, I resolved to turn his position by sending two divisions of the Fifteenth corps down the west bank of the Ogeechee, which were to force a crossing of the Cannoucher, and sent forward sufficient force to break the Gulf Railroad, and secure, if possible, King's Bridge, over the Ogeechee, about a mile above the railroad, also to reconnoitre with one division between the Ogeechee rivers. The movement on the right bank led; General Osterhaus in person conducted it with his First and Second divisions. I accompanied General Corse, who found a good ridge road on the left bank of the Big Ogeechee. We came upon some carefully constructed works some three miles and a half from Station No. 2, but they were abandoned. The road was obstructed with trees at several points, but the obstructi
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter III (search)
tillery came from Colonel W. P. Carlin, commanding a brigade at Pilot Knob and threatened with an attack by a Confederate force under Jeff. Thompson. The latter had already made a raid in Carlin's rear, destroyed the railroad bridge across the Big River, and interfered seriously with the communication to St. Louis. In the nervous condition of the military as well as the public mind at that time, even St. Louis was regarded as in danger. There was no organized battery in St. Louis, but therthe school of the piece, but no more. I hastily put them upon the cars, with four old smooth-bore bronze guns, horses that had never been hitched to a piece, and harness that had not been fitted to the horses. Early next morning we arrived at Big River where the bridge had been burned, unloaded the battery and horses by the use of platforms extemporized from railroad ties, hitched up, and forded the river. On the other side we converted platform-cars into stock-cars, loaded up, and arrived a
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
proposed inveiglement of, across the Tennessee, 322 Benham, Capt., reports condition of Gen. Blunt's district, 93 Benicia, the, S. returns from Hawaii on, 431 Bennett's House, N. C., capitulation of Johnston at, 335, 351-353 Bentonville, N. C., battle of, 346 Bible, the inspiration of the, 8, 9 Bigelow, John, U. S. Minister to France, 383, 384, 391, 392; letter from Seward, Nov. 4, 1865, 384; share in the Mexican negotiations, 391, 392; letter from S., Feb. 25, 1866, 392 Big River, military operations on the, 51 Black Point, Cal., S. at, 188 Blair, Maj.-Gen. Frank P., Jr., S.'s friendship with, 31, 138; patriotism and courage, 31; introduces S. to Fremont, 48, 49; opinion of Fremont, 49; movement favoring his succeeding S. in command in Missouri, 59, 60; correspondence with Halleck, Aug. 11-12, 1862, 59, 60; letter to S., Aug. 13, 59; denies attempt to oust S., 59, 60; views on administration of the Missouri militia, 60; reveals plot to S., 86; in the Atlanta cam
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1864 (search)
tachment). Oct. 5-6: Skirmishes, Prince's Shoals, Osage River, Cole CountyMISSOURI--1st, 7th and 9th State Militia Cavalry. Oct. 7: Action, Moreau Bottom, Jefferson CityARKANSAS--2d Cavalry. ILLINOIS--17th Cavalry. MISSOURI--15th Cavalry; 1st, 3d, 5th, 6th and 8th State Militia Cavalry; Batteries "B," "C" and "L," 2d Light Arty.; 45th and 49th Infantry; 5th State Militia Infantry; Gasconade Regt. Militia; Enrolled Militia Cavalry, Artillery and Infantry. Oct. 7: Skirmish, Tyler's Mills, Big RiverMISSOURI--6th Cavalry (2d Battalion). Oct. 8: Skirmish near Jefferson CityMISSOURI--1st, 6th and 7th State Militia Cavalry. Oct. 8: Skirmish, Barry CountyARKANSAS--1st Cavalry. Oct. 9: Skirmish, BoonevilleMISSOURI--15th Cavalry; 7th State Militia Cavalry. Oct. 9: Skirmish, CaliforniaIOWA--1st Cavalry. MISSOURI--1st, 4th and 7th State Militia Cavalry; Batteries "H" and "L," 2d Light Arty. Oct. 9: Skirmish, RussellvilleMISSOURI--6th State Militia Cavalry; Battery "H," 2d Light Arty. Oct
and Fortieth, and One Hundred and Forty-second Illinois hundred-day volunteers also began to arrive on the thirtieth, and were all in by October first, and formed into a brigade, under Colonel Wangelin, for the immediate defence of the city, beyond which they did not wish to serve, as all of them were out over time, and many having desirable offers as substitutes. The enemy, moving up by Potosi, seemed to halt at Richwoods, about four miles south-west of St. Louis, in the hills between Big River and the Meramec, as if concentrating for an attack on the city. This appeared the more possible from the magnitude of his interest in it, and the fact that he did not show much force in the Meramec valley, even on the thirtieth. On that day Major-General Smith was ordered to occupy Kirkwood, which commands the Richwoods road and crossing of the Meramec to St. Louis, his cavalry to reconnoitre south and west, Colonel Merrill going as far as Franklin. General Fisk, previously ordered to
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
6, 2, 66, 3; 161, D10 Action, Oct. 22, 1864 66, 2, 66, 3 Big Cacapon River, W. Va. 85, 1 Big Creek, Ark. 153, H8; 159, A11, 159, H11 Big Creek, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 142, C2, 142, E5 Big Creek Gap, Tenn. 24, 3; 95, 3; 118, 2; 142, C2; 150, G13 Big Hatchie River, Tenn. 117, 1; 153, G10 Big Hill, Ky. 141, F2; 150, B12, 150, B13; 151, H13 Big Lake, Ark. 153, F9; 154, F6 Big Mound, Dak. Ter. 33, 4 Action, July 24, 1863 33, 4 Big River, Mo. 152, H8 Big Sandy Creek, Miss. 36, 1; 154, G10; 155, D8 Big Sewell Mountain, W. Va. 141, D11, 141, E11 Big Shanty, Ga. 43, 4; 48, 5; 49, 4; 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 6; 59, 1, 59, 3; 62, 1, 62, 13, 62, 14; 76, 2; 88, 2; 96, 5; 101, 14; 117, 1; 149, G13 Big Spring, Ky. 150, B7, 150, D2, 150, D7; 151, F12, 151, G8 Big Spring, Va. 81, 1; 84, 6 Big Springs, Mo. 152, D6 Big Sunflower River, Miss. 155, A8 Biloxi, Miss. 135-A; 147, E1; 156, C13; 17
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