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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
15. (Cos. C and M at Newport News March to May.) Action at Blackwater, near Zuni, May 30, 1862. Companies A, E, G, H and L ordered t Action at Franklin August 31. Reconnoissance from Franklin to Blackwater October 3. Suffolk October 15. Reconnoissance from Suffolk ecember 1-3. Beaver Dam Creek December 1. Near Franklin and Blackwater December 2. Suffolk December 12. Expedition toward BlackwatBlackwater January 8-10, 1863. Action at Deserted House January 30. Norfolk February 10 (Co. M ). Franklin and Blackwater March 17. SiegeBlackwater March 17. Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. Somerton Road April 15. Edenton Road April 24. Reconnoissance through Gates County, N. C., and down ChowaMatthews and Middlesex Counties March 17-21. Reconnoissance to Blackwater April 13-15. Butler's operations on south side of the James anmphis to Grand Gulf, Miss., July 4-24. Near Bolivar July 6. Blackwater July 10. Port Gibson July 14. Grand Gulf July 16-17. Smi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
ress Monroe August 16-23; thence to Suffolk September 18. Duty at Suffolk till December. Blackwater October 9. Blackwater, near Zuni, October 25. Blackwater October 29. Expedition from Blackwater, near Zuni, October 25. Blackwater October 29. Expedition from Suffolk December 1-3. Beaver Dam Station December 1. Near Franklin on the Blackwater December 2. Ordered to New Berne, N. C., December 4. Foster's Expedition from New Berne to Goldsboro DeBlackwater October 29. Expedition from Suffolk December 1-3. Beaver Dam Station December 1. Near Franklin on the Blackwater December 2. Ordered to New Berne, N. C., December 4. Foster's Expedition from New Berne to Goldsboro December 10-21. Southwest Creek December 13-14. Kinston December 14. Whitehall December 16. Goldsboro December 17. Duty at New Berne till May, 1863. Expedition from New Berne to Mattamrps, Dept. of Virginia. Service. Duty at Suffolk till May, 1863. Expedition toward Blackwater, Va., January 8-10, 1863. Deserted House January 30. Leesville April 4. Siege of Suffol 7th Corps, to July 1863. Service. Duty at Suffolk till June, 1863. Expedition toward Blackwater January 8-10, 1863. Deserted House January 30. Leesville April 4. Siege of Suffolk Ap
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
63. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. Service. Duty at East Capital Hill, Fort Ethan Allen and Miner's Hill, Defenses of Washington, till January 14, 1863. Guard duty at Convalescent Camp till April 15. Moved to Norfolk, thence to Suffolk April 15-19. Siege of Suffolk April 19-May 4. Siege of Suffolk raised May 4. Expedition to destroy Norfolk & Petersburg Railroad and Seaboard & Roanoke Railroad May 16-27. Expedition to Blackwater June 12-18. Moved to Norfolk June 19, thence to Yorktown, and to Williamsburg June 22. Duty at Williamsburg till June 30. Left Yorktown for home July 2. Mustered out July 13, 1863. Regiment lost 8 by disease. 12th Rhode Island Regiment Infantry. Organized at Providence and mustered in for nine months October 18, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., October 21. Attached to 1st Brigade, Casey's Division, Military District of Washington, to December, 1862. 1st
occupied on the front; it received the name of Camp Misery, but it was soon so improved that it became healthy and pleasant. On the 11th, a large force, including the Sixth, was sent to a ford of the Blackwater, to rout a rebel force. The regiment lost a gallant officer,—Lieutenant Barr, of Company I, Lawrence, who was shot through the heart. At midnight, Jan. 29, the regiment fell in, under General Corcoran, a part of a force of four thousand three hundred men, and marched towards Blackwater; the Sixth supporting our Seventh battery, who were under fire for the first time. The position of the regiment was on the edge of a swamp, and was very exposed. The engagement lasted two hours under close range,—eight hundred yards. The day following, another engagement occurred, ending in a repulse of the foe. The force returned, after a march of thirty-five miles, and three fights—all in twenty-four hours. The night was pitch dark; the shot and shell ploughed incessantly; but the men<
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
leave the department, but I would spare that number, provided they could be supplied at short notice. On the tenth, at 4:30 P. M., as the troop train was leaving, I was informed of the contents of a captured mail by General Viele, to the effect that General Longstreet would attack me at once with from forty to sixty thousand; that he had maps, plans, and a statement of my force, and that General Hill would co-operate. On the eleventh, Hood's division followed up my cavalry returning from Blackwater on the South Quay roads, and about four P. M. captured, without a shot, the cavalry outposts. Others followed on other roads, and a surprise in open day was attempted. The signal officers, under Captain Tamblyn, rendered most signal service. Lieutenant Thayer held his station for a long time, in spite of the riflemen about him. On the twelfth, about noon, Picket's division advanced on the Sommerton, Jenkins on the Edenton, and a large column on the river, by the Providence Church roa
to Trion, and returned ten miles on Elyton road, thence to Johnson's Ferry, forty miles above Tuscaloosa. April third, moved to Northport, and on the fifth marched twenty-five miles on Columbus road to King's store; sixth, moved on Pleasant Ridge road twelve miles to Lanier's mill, from there returned to Northport, and remained until the eleventh instant. On the eleventh marched to Windham Springs; twelfth and thirteenth marched around head of Wolf Creek; fourteenth to Comack's mills, on Blackwater, thence to Sipsey Fork, off Black Warrior, and crossed during sixteenth. On the seventeenth marched via Arkadelphia to Mulberry Fork, crossing at Hanley's mills; eighteenth, marched to and crossed Little Warrior, at Menters Ferry ; nineteenth, moved to Mount Pinson, fourteen miles north of Elyton; twentieth, moved via Trussville and Cedar Grove, and arrived at Talladega on the twenty-second. On the twenty-third moved to Munford's Station; twenty-fourth marched via Oxford and Davistown t
63, p. 4, col. 5; April 28, p. 4, cols. 1, 2; April 29, p. 2, cols. 2-4. Bixby, Mrs., of Ward 11, Boston, having had five sons die in the service, has a letter from President Lincoln; full text Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 228. Blackwater, Va. Engagement of Nov. 17, 1862. 6th Regt. M. V. M. Long detailed account. Boston Evening Journal, Nov. 24, 1862, p. 4, col. 3. Blair, Montgomery. Opening the Mississippi. United Service Mag., vol. 4, p. 33. Blaisdell, col. Wm., . 2, 1861, p. 1, cols. 5, 6. — – Camp at Suffolk, Va., 1862, 1863. Letter from troops, chiefly describing the country. Boston Evening Journal, Nov. 17, 1862, p. 4, col. 4. —6th Regt. Mass. Vol. Mil. Camp at Suffolk, Va., 1862, 1863. Blackwater, Va., Nov. 17, 1862; long detailed account. Boston Evening Journal, Nov. 24, 1862, p. 4, col. 3. — – – Beaver Dam Church, Va., Dec. 1, 1862. Boston Evening Journal, Dec. 6, 1862, p. 2, col. 4. — – – Zuni, Va., Dec. 12, 1862. Bos
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
Mississippians and Semmes' and Wofford's Georgians, was the South Carolina brigade of Gen. J. B. Kershaw. Also in the First corps were the batteries of Capt. Hugh R. Garden (Palmetto) and Captain Bachman's German artillery, with Hood's division, and the Brooks (Rhett's) battery, Lieut. S. C. Gilbert, in Alexander's battalion of Walton's reserve artillery. Gen. Micah Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, of Pickett's division, Longstreet's corps, was detached for special duty on the Blackwater, in southeast Virginia, under Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill. In the Third army corps (A. P. Hill's), South Carolina was represented by McGowan's brigade, Hill's light division —North Carolinians, South Carolinians and Georgians—now being commanded by Pender, and the South Carolina brigade by Col. Abner Perrin. Maj. C. W. McCreary commanded the First regiment, Capt. W. M. Hadden the First rifles, Capt. J. L. Miller the Twelfth, Lieut.-Col. B. T. Brockman the Thirteenth, and Lieut.-Col. J. N. Brown the Fourte
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
battle of Manassas, the defense of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Gaines' Mill, Frayser's Farm, Second Manassas, Boonsboro Gap, Fredericksburg, Suffolk, Blackwater, Va., Chickamauga, Ga., Chattanooga, Will's Valley, Lenoir Station, Campbell's Station and siege of Knoxville, up to the winter of 1863. He was then granted a furd. Subsequently he was in the battle of Fredericksburg, in Pickett's division, and after that took part in Longstreet's operations against Suffolk, fighting at Blackwater, and New Hope Church and in the siege of Suffolk. With Jenkins' brigade he went to north Georgia under Longstreet, and participated in the skirmish on Lookout ecember 31st following was promoted to junior second lieutenant. Subsequently he participated in the several weeks of heavy skirmishing before Suffolk and near Blackwater; was on duty with Jenkins' brigade at Richmond and Petersburg, and in the fall of 1863 accompanied Longstreet's command to Chattanooga. He was in battle at Wil
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
C2; 161, D12, 161, D14 Black River, N. C. 79, 5; 80, 8, 80, 11; 86, 7; 133, 1; 138, F5, 138, H6; 139, A9 Battle of, March 16, 1865. See Averasborough, N. C. Black River, S. C. 117, 1; 135-A; 139, C3; 143, D13 Blacksburg, Va. 118, 1; 141, G12 Blackville, S. C. 76, 2; 79, 3; 80, 3; 86, 3; 117, 1; 118, 1; 120, 2; 135-A; 143, F10; 144, B10; 171 Blackwater, Mo. 161, D11 Blackwater Bay, Fla. 110, 1 Blackwater Bridge, Va. 93, 1; 137, H9 Blackwater River, Va. 93, 1; 137, H1, 137, H9; 138, A12 Blair's Landing, La. 53, 1 Blakely, Ala. 61, 6; 71, 13, 71, 14; 110, 1; 135-A; 147, D4 Fort Blakely, Ala. Assault, April 9, 1865 61, 6; 71, 14 Blakeny's Bridge, S. C. 139, B3; 143, B12 Fort Bliss, Tex. 54, 1 Bloomery Gap, W. Va. 100, 1 Bloomfield, Ky. 150, A9; 151, G10 Bloomfield, Mo. 47, 1; 135-A; 153, C10 Bloomington, Tenn. 153, H10 Blount's Creek, N. C. 24, 5; 80, 8; 138, F9, 138,
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