hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 170 results in 55 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
ll the other brilliant efforts of Washington Generalship. What a pity that so much dash and heroism on the part of both officers and men should have been thrown away on an enterprise which, like she assault on the enemy's line at Fredericksburg, was destined from the first to be fruitless. The Tribune's Suffolk correspondent, December 23d, says: Yesterday, politically speaking, was a dull election day in this section. A few votes were cast in Suffolk, and no returns will be received from Isle of Wight, Windsor, or Smithfield. The rebels from the other side of Blackwater came over to put a quietus upon Union men who might try to vote. Lieut. Col. B. F. Underwood, of the New York Mounted Rifles, was sent with a detachment to carry the ballot-box out to the rebellious sections named, and had sent the precious ark of freedom as far as Smithfield, and was about visiting other places, when he was set upon by an overwhelming rebel force, and had a hard race for Suffolk.
nt us from receiving reinforcements. As I write this more prisoners are passing. They express gladness at being taken, for they anticipate something good to eat. Col. Spear has advanced with his cavalry brigade to a point one mile on the Blackwater road, which is to the right of the place where the Franklin and Petersburg railroads cross each other. The enemy is now in a straight line, about four miles from here. Col. Spear has opened with his howitzers, for the enemy is advancing skirm a military order " At half-past 9 o'clock we had to abandon our outmost signal station, the enemy having advanced close enough to pick off our men while engaged in signalizing. This was done immediately after a portion of cavalry on the Blackwater road were heavily fired upon and driven The signal station thus abandoned is a very curious affair and an ingenious one, too. It consists of nothing more nor less than a huge true, with the top sawed off and a platform on it. The reader m
Yankee prisoners. --On yesterday 36 Yankee prisoners were brought from Vicksburg and lodged in Castle Thunder. Included in the number was Captain T. P. Bowell, of the steamboat Minnesota, and crew, captured at Greenville, Miss, May 3d. Some of the Yankee soldiers in the lot were taken at Port Gibson. On Tuesday ten prisoners were brought from Milford Depot. Among the number was A. B. Wells, 1st Lieut. co. F, 8th Penn. regiment, captured in King George county, May 17th. Thirty five privates of the Yankee army, mostly members of the New York Mounted Rifles, were received from Suffolk yesterday, having been captured at Blackwater, May 17th.
Runaway. --The undersigned will pay a liberal reward for the apprehension of a mulatto Boy, who ran away on or about the 5th inst. at Franklin, on Blackwater. Said boy was 5 feet 11 inches, light complexion, good countenance, and some education, and will probably attempt to pass for a free man. J. H. Lente, 1st Texas regiment. my 20--6t*
Runaway --The undersigned will pay a liberal reward for the apprehension of a mulatto who ran away on or about the 5th inst at Franklin on Blackwater. Said boy was 5 feet 11 inches light complexion, good countenance, and some education, and will probably attempt to pass for a free man. J H Leeth, my 30--6t* 1st Texas regiment.
Runaway. --The undersigned will pay a liberal reward for the apprehension of a muletto Boy, who ran away on or about the 5th inst, at Franklin, on Blackwater. Said boy was 5 feet 11 inches, light complexion, good countenance, and some education, and will probably attempt to pass for a free man. J. H. Jeste, 1st Texes regiment. my 10--6t*
Runaway. --The undersigned will pay a liberal reward for the apprehension of a mulatto boy, who ran away on or about the 5th inst., at Franklin, on Blackwater. Said boy was 5 feet 11 inches, light complexion, good countenance, and some education, and will probably attempt to pass for a free man. J. H. Lenyn, 1st Texas regiment. my 20--6t*
there were about 20,000 Yankees at Suffolk and between there and Norfolk. The rumor which has prevailed here for several days, that Suffolk was being evacuated, has no foundation in truth. Many of the large guns mounted while General Long street was in the vicinity have been removed, and fortifications are being thrown up at Bowers's Hill, eight miles above Portsmouth. This probably gave rise to the rumor. The Yankee pickets now extend only a few miles from Suffolk, in the direction of Blackwater, though the cavalry are frequently passing through the country surrounding. It says: Our informant was in Suffolk during the siege of General Longstreet, and represents the Yankees as being greatly alarmed. Had Longstreet attacked the place on the first day of his arrival, it could have been taken with little loss on our side. But after reinforcements arrived a determined resistance would have been made. All the citizens arrested here have been released except Richard Hozier, who
z, and Parallel, in the Yazoo river, the Dew Drop, Emms Bott, Sharke, and Mears, in the Sunflower. We have only left, of all the splendid fleet which caught refuge in the Yazoo river, the Hope, Hartford City, McCulloch, and Cotton Plant, which are up the Tallahatchie and Yellobuche. The Kennett is sunk across the mouth of the Yellobuche, and the Walsh across that of the Tallahatchie. The gunboats came up the river as far as the month of the Tula river, and raided in the direction of Blackwater and Lexington. This closes the history of another strongly defended river. I am indebted to Captain Applagale, captain and owner of the Walsh, for the above interesting facts. He is on his way to Richmond to secure a settlement of his affairs with the Government. Other owners and captains are enroute for the same purpose. I trust the Navy Department will adjust the affairs of these gentlemen as promptly as possible, not only because it is proper and right that they should be paid
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1864., [Electronic resource], Quantrell's Exodus from Missouri--the Blount fight. (search)
Quantrell's Exodus from Missouri--the Blount fight. A correspondent of the Texas Telegraph, who is contributing to that paper "Sketches of Quantrell's Men," gives the following account of the Blount affair, the fullest we have yet seen from a Confederate source: Towards the middle of September the guerillas reunited at Blackwater, and were ready in a few hours to leave the rendezvous for their march South. Cold nights and occasional frost had warned them to leave Missouri, and like poor houseless birds of passage, beaten by the pitiless storm, they sought a more genial clime, where the grass was green and Federals less numerous. Missouri would afford no shelter or safety after winter had set in; the bare and leafless forests no hiding places, and the pure driven snow would afford to the enemy the best means of tracking the hunted and hungry guerillas whenever they should leaves their holes in search of food. Outlawed by an order of General Blount, proscribed by every Yan
1 2 3 4 5 6