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The Daily Dispatch: April 20, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Retirement of the enemy from the Blackwater region. (search)
The Retirement of the enemy from the Blackwater region. It is stated upon authority deemed reliable that the force of the enemy which was at Suffolk and in the Blackwater region last week have nearly all returned to Fortress Konrad. During their visit to that section they committed the usual depredations which attend their raids, and carried off and destroyed a considerable amount of property. While at Smithfield, Isle of Wight county, they entered the residence of Mr. Frederick CowpBlackwater region last week have nearly all returned to Fortress Konrad. During their visit to that section they committed the usual depredations which attend their raids, and carried off and destroyed a considerable amount of property. While at Smithfield, Isle of Wight county, they entered the residence of Mr. Frederick Cowper, and stole the library of his brother, R. C. P. Cowper, who is now the Lieutenant Governor of the Pierpont Government.--They also carried of from this place about one hundred negroes. On Thursday morning a fight occurred on the farm of Mr. Wronn, near Burwell's Bay, between a force of the Yankees numbering some 300 or 400, who had landed at the latter point, and a few Confederates who had been gathered together by Major Milligan, of the Signal Corps, and Capt. Causey, of the In this eng
ing of Mr. Robert Taylor. We learn that co. G, of the City Battalion, Capt. Bass, was engaged with the dismounted cavalry in making the capture. While the Suwanee was burning two gunboats appeared around the bend in the river and commenced shelling our men, who were crossing Pickett's field with the prisoners, but without any effect. Repulse of the enemy on the Blackwater. A body of Yankee cavalry, under the command of the notorious Col. Speare, attempted to cross the Blackwater river yesterday at Broadwater Bridge, near Ivor.--They were handsomely repulsed by a portion of Gen. Clingman's brave North Carolina troops, and retired out of sight. Our scouts from that section report this body of cavalry as being quite formidable in numbers — some estimating it as high as 3,000. At last accounts they were heading around towards the source of the Blackwater, in Prince George, and may endeavor to effect a junction with the enemy now at City Point. We fear that the Sussex
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry Raid, &c. (search)
to be read to the troops early Saturday morning, stating that Grant had gained a great victory over Lee; had driven him twenty miles, and at last accounts was self-driving him. This lying announcement was received with a great outburst of applause, of cause, Speare's cavalry Raid. The notorious Speare, who was so successfully driven back at Broadwater Bridge on Friday, by Sturdivant's battery and Col Ratcliffe's regiment, immediately turned his course towards the source of the Blackwater river, and crossed at a point several miles higher up, where the stream is so insignificant as to be easily forded.--here he met no opposition, and made a detour which brought him to Wakefield Depot, on the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, where he stopped Friday night. He did not burn the depot, nor interfere with private property further than to steal horses, corn, and provender. He seized four negro men, hired by the Railroad Company, but afterwards released them, and told them they were
The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry raid, &c. (search)
o be read to the troops early Saturday morning, stating that Grant had gained a great victory over Lee; had driven him twenty miles, and at last accounts was still driving him. This lying announcement was received with a great outburst of applause, of course. Speare's cavalry raid. The notorious Speare, who was so successfully driven back at Broadwater Bridge on Friday, by Sturdivant's battery and Col Ratcliffe's regiment, immediately turned his course towards the source if the Blackwater river, and crossed at a point several miles higher up, where the stream is so insignificant as to be easily forded.--Here he met no opposition, and made a detour which brought him to Wakefield Depot, on the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, where he stopped Friday night. He did not burn the depot nor interfere with private property further than to steal horses, corn, and provender. He seized four negro men, hired by the Railroad Company, but afterwards released them, and told them they were a
r the charge, between a section of Pegram's battery and a battery of the enemy, at a distance of 500 yards. Our pieces were splendidly served, and the fire was spirited and effective. The black scoundrels in the service of the United States continue their work of vandalism in Prince George county, on the south side of the Appomattox. On Wednesday night and Thursday morning they burnt the dwellings of Marinas Gilliam, Dr. Theo. Gilliam, and Frank Green. Surely, a day of retribution is in store for these wretches, whose sole object seems to be to plunder and destroy the property of unoffending citizens. A dispatch from Gen. Beauregard states that matters remained quiet on the Southside yesterday. From the Blackwater Region. The Yankees, under Major Gates, made a raid into Nansemond county last week and arrested Col John R Copeland, Dr Philip Corbin, Richard Knight, and Robert E Riddick. The last-named was a member of the 3d Virginia regiment, at home on furlough.
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