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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barras, Count Louis de, 1781- (search)
Barras, Count Louis de, 1781- Naval officer; born in Provence, France; was one of the chief officers of the Marquis de Ternay, commander of the French squadron sent to aid the Americans in 1781. He was designated to represent the navy in the conference between Washington and Rochambeau in Wetherfield, Conn., May 23, 1781, but was unable to be present on account of the sudden appearance of the British squadron off Block Island. In September following he effected a junction with the squadron of De Grasse in Chesapeake Bay, and the enlarged French fleet prevented the British fleet from going to the rescue of Lord Cornwallis, and so made certain the surrender of the British at Yorktown. He died about 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Block, or Blok, Adriaen, 1610- (search)
Block, or Blok, Adriaen, 1610- Navigator; born in Amsterdam, Holland. In 1610 he made a successful voyage to Manhattan (now New York) Bay, taking back to Amsterdam a cargo of rich furs. In 1614 he bought a merchant ship, the Tiger, and again visited Manhattan. the Tiger was accidentally destroyed by fire, but with his crew he made a yacht, named the Unrest, and with this explored adjacent waters. He was the first European to sail through Hell Gate, and he discovered the rivers now known by the names of Housatonic and Connecticut. The latter he explored as far as the site of Hartford, and still pushing east discovered Block Island, which was named for him. After reaching Cape Cod he left the Unrest, and returned to Holland on one of the ships which had sailed with him on his westward cruise.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Block Island, events at. (search)
Block Island, events at. In 1636, John Oldham (q. v.) was trading in a vessel of his own along the shores of Connecticut, and near Block Island he was attacked by Indians of that island, and he and his crew were murdered. Filled with the barbarians, who did not know how to manage rudder or sail, the vessel was found drifting by John Gallop, a Massachusetts fisherman, who had only a man and two boys with him. They gallantly attacked the Indians, killed or drove them into the sea, and recaptBlock Island he was attacked by Indians of that island, and he and his crew were murdered. Filled with the barbarians, who did not know how to manage rudder or sail, the vessel was found drifting by John Gallop, a Massachusetts fisherman, who had only a man and two boys with him. They gallantly attacked the Indians, killed or drove them into the sea, and recaptured the vessel — the first naval fight on the New England coast. They found the dead body of Oldham on the deck, yet bleeding, The Block Island Indians were allies of the Pequods, and were protected by the latter. The murder of Oldham was a signal for war. In August five small vessels, carrying about 100 men, under John Endicott, sailed from Boston to punish the Block Island savages. His orders from the magistrates were to kill all the men, but to spare the women and children. There were fo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Endicott, John, 1589- (search)
Endicott, John, 1589- Colonial governor; born in Dorchester, England, in 1589; was John Endicott. sent by the Massachusetts Company to superintend the plantation at Naumkeag; arrived there Sept. 6 (N. S.), and in April next year was appointed governor of the colony, but was succeeded by John Winthrop. In 1636 he was sent with Captain Underhill, with about ninety men, on an expedition against Indians on Block Island and the Pequods. Mr. Endicott was deputy-governor of Massachusetts several years, and also governor, in which office he died, March 15, 1665. Bold, energetic, sincere, and bigoted, he was the strongest of the Puritans, and was severe in the execution of laws against those who differed from the prevailing theology of the colony. He was one of the most persistent persecutors of the Quakers, and stood by unmoved, as governor, when they were hanged in Boston; and so violent were his feelings against the Roman Catholics, and anything that savored of popery, that he ca
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, colony of (search)
ilt log-cabins at the lower end of Manhattan, and there constructed a rude ship during the winter, which they called Onrust— unrest —and this was the beginning of the great commercial mart, the city of New York. In the spring of 1614 Block sailed through the dangerous strait at Hell Gate, passed through the East River and Long Island Sound, discovered the Housatonic, Connecticut, and Thames rivers, and that the long strip of land on the south was an island (Long Island); saw and named Block Island, entered Narraganset Bay and the harbor of Boston, and, returning to Amsterdam, made such a favorable report of the country that commercial enterprise was greatly stimulated, and, in 1614, the States-General of Holland granted special privileges for traffic with the natives by Hollanders. A company was formed, and with a map of the Hudson River region, constructed, probably, under the supervision of Block, they sent deputies to The Hague--the seat of government—to obtain a charter. It w<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oldham, John 1600- (search)
d traitors, and, when proved guilty, he attempted to excite a mutiny on the spot. Lyford burst into tears and confessed that he feared he was a reprobate. Both were ordered to leave the colony, but Lyford, humbly begging to stay, asking forgiveness and promising good behavior, was reinstated. Oldham went to Nantasket, with some of his adherents, and engaged in traffic with the Indians. Lyford was soon detected again in seditious work and expelled from the colony. He joined Oldham. They afterwards lived at Hull and Cape Anne, and Oldham represented Watertown in the popular branch of the Massachusetts government in 1634. He made an exploring journey to the site of Windsor, on the Connecticut River, the next year, which was followed by the emigration to that region in 1635. While in a vessel at Block Island, in July, 1636, Oldham was murdered by some Indians, who fled to the Pequods, on the mainland, and were protected by them. This led to the war with the Pequod Indians (q. v.).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pequod War, the (search)
able of bearing arms. Sassacus undertook the task alone. First his people kidnapped children, murdered men alone in the forests or on the waters, and swept away fourteen families. A Massachusetts trading-vessel was seized by the Indians at Block Island, plundered, and its commander, John Oldham, murdered. They were allies of the Pequods, who protected them. The authorities at Boston sent Endicott and Captain Gardiner to chastise them. With a small military force in three vessels they entered Long Island Sound. They killed some Indians at Block Island, and left the domain a blackened desolation. Then they went over to the mainland, made some demands which they could not enforce; desolated fields, burned wigwams, killed a few people, and departed. The exasperated Pequods sent ambassadors to the Narraganset's urging them to join in a war of extermination. Through the influence of Roger Williams, who rendered good for evil, the Narragansets were not only kept from joining the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rhode Island, (search)
Rhode Island, One of the thirteen original States of the Union, and the smallest of the United States, is bounded on the north and east by Massachusetts, on the west by Connecticut, and on the south by the Atlantic Ocean. Block Island, about 9 miles from the mainland, is a portion of the State's territory. Area, 1,250 square miles, in five counties. Population 1890, 345,506; 1900, 428,556. Capitals, Providence and Newport. Roger Williams, banished from Plymouth colony, with five companies settles at a spot which he calls Providence......June, 1636 Aquedneck Island settled by eighteen proprietors at Portsmouth, now New Town, first called Pocasset......1637 Canonicus and his nephew Miantinomo, sachems of the Narragansets, deed to Roger Williams all lands between the Pawtucket and Pawtuxet rivers......March 24, 1638 Roger Williams and Governor Winthrop make a joint purchase of Prudence Island......Nov. 10, 1638 First general training or militia muster in Rhode Island
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Verrazzano, Giovanni da 1508- (search)
orthward, remembering that he was the first European who explored this part of the coast. A newe land, he exclaims in his letter, never before seen of any man, either auncient or moderne. Among the places which he describes, New York Harbor, Block Island (which he named Louisa, in honor of the King's mother), Newport, and other places have been identified. He continued along the Maine coast and as far as Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, which fishermen from Brittany had found twenty years beforeparagraph of this translation with sufficient clearness to admit of their being easily recognized. The island of a triangular form, resembling the island of Rhodes, which Verrazzano mentions as 50 leagues to the east of New York, is doubtless Block Island.—ed. Having supplied ourselves with every thing necessary, on the fifth of May we departed from the port, and sailed one hundred and fifty leagues, keeping so close to the coast as never to lose it from our sight; the nature of the country
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
and still burnt with powder. Colonel Higginson had been more or less associated in Worcester with Dr. E. E. Hale, who was for a time the only clergyman in that city who was willing to exchange with the pastor of the Free Church. I had such an amusing glimpse, he wrote, of Edward Hale and his numerous offspring. I was at the Redwood library [Newport] and heard the tramp of many feet and supposed it an excursion party; then his cheery voice. . . . They had stopped on their way from Block Island to the Narragansett region where they live. I showed them a few things and presently they streamed out again, I bidding them farewell. Going toward the door I met the elder girl returning, and looking for something as if she had dropped a glove or a handkerchief. I said, Are you looking for anything? and she said, smiling shyly, For a pair of twins! It was even so. Hale, counting up his party on the sidewalk, missed nothing but a pair of twins and sent her back to find them in some c
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