Your search returned 24 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 170. retreat of the wild Cat Brigade. (search)
entucky Third, (Gerrard's,) I believe, did not move that night. I know not why. The Thirty-eighth Ohio and the Thirty-third Indiana pushed forward to the summit of Wildcat, and halted, not long before day. The teams were also moving all night long. The necessity to carry the sick obliged us to leave much stores and ammunition. I am told we left twenty-two tuns of ammunition at London. And yet, readers, we were making a forced march to prevent the enemy from cutting us off, or to save Blue Grass. Strange that soldiers should leave their ammunition and march to meet the enemy. At Pitman's we met thirteen wagons loaded with commissary stores en route from Camp Dick Robinson for London. These were unloaded immediately, and proceeded to London for patients and stores. Some of the regiments had necessarily left their tents and camp equipage, so that even had fatigue permitted them to pitch tents, they could not have enjoyed the luxury. November 14.--A heavy storm of rain rouse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky. (search)
the campaign. The Kentucky river, rising in the southeastern portion of the State, flows in a northwesterly direction to Boonsboro, when, turning to the left, it sweeps around in a semi-circle to Frankfort, and pours thence directly into the Ohio. Within this semi-circle are embraced the counties of Woodford, Fayette and Jessamine, which are regarded as the most fertile in the State, and contained supplies sufficient to subsist General Bragg's army for some time. By crossing into this Blue Grass region the easily defensible line of the Kentucky river could have been occupied. If the enemy attempted to cross at McCown's Ferry, or the fords between these and Richmond, he exposed his line of communications. At whatever fords he might attempt to cross, General Bragg, moving upon the shorter line, would have been able to concentrate a force which would render the passage impracticable. If the enemy retraced his steps, as in all probability he must have done, all that had heretofore
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Hampshire Volunteers. (search)
the Potomac, to June, 1865. Service. Battle of South Mountain, Md., September 14, 1862. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17. Duty in Pleasant Valley, Md., till October 27, 1862. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 27-November 19. Waterloo Bridge November 9-10. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Burnside's Second Campaign, Mud March, January 20-24, 1863. Moved to Newport News, Va., February 11; thence to Lexington, Ky., March 25-31. Duty in the Blue Grass Region of Kentucky till June. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., June 3-14. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., June 14-July 4. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 4-10. Siege of Jackson, Miss., July 10-17. At Milldale, Miss., till August 10. Moved to Covington, Ky., August 10-21; thence to Camp Nelson, Ky., August 25. Duty guarding railroad between Cincinnati, Ohio, and Camp Nelson, Ky., till January, 1864. Moved to Camp Burnside January 15. March to Knoxville, Tenn., February 19-Ma
ction, and led to the belief that the enemy had an objective point somewhere between the break in the Central Railroad at Paris, and that upon the road from here to Louisville. This place, it seemed to me, held out greater inducements to him than any other; inasmuch as here he could strike the greatest blow to the State by the destruction of the public records, &c.; and could arm his new recruits, whom he was rapidly mounting, as he passed along, upon the finest stock ever produced in the Blue Grass region. In addition to this, General Burbridge, having come upon his rear, as we were informed by special courier, was pressing him with the utmost vigor. Here he could procure artillery, and cross his command in a few hours; and, destroying the bridges, avoid, or so delay pursuit as to be able to strike the Louisville and Nashville Railroad with impunity. In view of these conclusions, which subsequent events proved to be correct, it was determined not to send any part of the cavalry
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
hey had expected. Individual welcome was expressed, but cautiously and free from demonstration, for the Southern element, even in the localities where found in the majority, well knew that upon the coming of the Federal troops they would be persecuted and punished. The sympathy was divided, but in Hart and several contiguous counties the Union sentiment predominated and there had been many Federal troops raised there. There was no unfurling of the Confederate flag and cheering as in the Blue Grass region. Even the ladies, usually fearless of consequences, had learned caution, and if they waved their handkerchiefs, it was generally in a hall shut out from the view of their neighbors and visible only to the troops passing in front. At Bardstown it was somewhat better, but the division of sentiment was sufficient to put a restraint upon the Southern element, while those of Union sympathies did not disguise their sentiments nor fail to express their confidence in speedy aid from the
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
t a victorious enemy free to move at will in any direction. In view of this situation, the council with one exception, concurred in the propriety of a retreat through Cumberland Gap while the route was open and the roads were yet good. Gen. Humphrey Marshall, who simultaneously with General Bragg's advance into Kentucky had come through Pound Gap from southwestern Virginia, with several thousand cavalry, favored crossing to the north side of the Kentucky river, sustaining the army in the Blue Grass region as long as possible and then retreating into Virginia by way of Pound Gap. General Bragg so far acceded to his proposition as to permit his return the same way. And so it was resolved to evacuate Kentucky. Cumberland Gap had been abandoned on September 17th by Gen. Geo. W. Morgan, who had made his way through the mountains by way of Manchester, Beattyville and West Liberty to Greenup on the Ohio, where he had arrived on the 3rd of October. His progress was impeded somewhat by th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Captain West responded for Captain Tiffany in eloquent terms, and the old gentleman himself melted down in attempting to say a few words. He found that these hard fighters knew how to appreciate kindness shown them in the hour of their need. The exercises were appropriately closed with the benediction by Rev. Dr. J. L. Burrows, of Norfolk, Va. The homes of the city were thrown wide open to the men whom Lexington always gladly greeted in the shifting scenes of the war, and far famed Blue Grass hospitality was abundantly illustrated. We found our home with our old friend Major H. B. McClellan, who used to ride so gallantly with Stuart and Hampton as Adjutant-General of the cavalry corps, Army of Northern Virginia, and has, with his accomplished wife, made the Sayre Female Institute so renowned for honest teaching and accomplished graduates. Major McClellan has made considerable progress in his Biography of J. E. B. Stuart, and having had the privilege of reading some of the
forms the water- shed for all the Green river drainage, the streams north of it running direct into the Ohio. It starts in a high bluff upon the latter river, twenty miles west of Louisville, and increasing in height as it goes, can be traced 300 miles East to its junction with the Cumberland mountains. Two-thirds of the State is South of this range. The country North is an alternation of large tracts of hilly lands, with still larger tracts of the most fertile plains. The celebrated "Blue Grass" region, around Lexington, is just North of the ridge. The hill itself, at the railroad crossing, is some ten miles wide, and has but one side, the tableland South running off upon a level with its summit; while the country towards Louisville is some 600 feet lower, with deep and narrow valleys running up into the hill. It forms a magnificent line of defence, as, although not very high, it can be crossed at but few points. The Lebanon Branch railroad starts from the main line, 30 miles
The Daily Dispatch: December 5, 1861., [Electronic resource], Federal reports from Southeastern Kentucky. (search)
the brigade. The Kentucky 3d, (Garrard's,) I believe, did not move that night. I know not why. The 38th Ohio and the 33d Indiana pushed forward to the summit of Wild Cat, and halted not long before day. The teams were also moving all night long. The necessity to carry the sick obliged us to leave much stores and ammunition. I am told we left twenty-two tons of ammunition at London. And yet, readers, we are making a forced march to prevent the enemy from cutting us off, or to save Blue Grass. Strange that soldiers should leave their ammunition and march to meet the enemy. At Pitman's we met thirteen wagons loaded with commissary stores, en route from camp Dick Robinson for London. These were unloaded immediately, and proceeded to London for patients and stores. Some of the regiments had necessarily left their tents and camp equipage, so that even had fatigue permitted them to pitched tents they could not have enjoyed the luxury. November 14--A heavy storm of rain
nt. The Journal says: We find in the Maysville Eagle the following copy of a letter from John S. Williams, which was taken from the person of ex-State Senator Henry M. Rust, who was killed at the battle of Ivy Mountain, near Pikesville.--The Eagle says the original is in the possession of the Hon. W. H. Wadsworth, and by "sweeping the mountains of every foe" is plainly meant that he designed to drive every Union man from his home before he commenced the same work of the devil in the Blue Grass region: Prestonsburg, Oct. 21, 1861. Henry M. Rust Dear Sir: --I am in receipt of your of yesterday. The army we are rallying here is intended to defend the mountains. We shall sweep the mountains of every foe before we move forward. The right mode for the mountain people to defend their homes is to come in at once and bring their guns. I received instructions from Richmond yesterday to muster in for twelve months. Get up a force at once; a force strong enough to
1 2