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Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 4 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 2 0 Browse Search
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nd stole from men the sacred sense that parteth right and wrong. Then a red flash — the lightning across the darkness broke, And with a voice that shook the land, the guns of Sumter spoke: Wake! sons of heroes, wake! the age of heroes dawns again; Truth takes in hand her ancient sword, and calls her loyal men. Lo! brightly o'er the breaking day shines Freedom's holy star, Peace cannot cure the sickly time. All hail, the healer, War.! That call was heard by Plymouth rock; 'twas heard in Boston bay; Then up the piny streams of Maine sped on its ring: ing way; New Hampshire's rocks, Vermont's green hills, it kindled into flame; Rhode Island felt her mighty soul bursting her little frame: The Empire City started up, her golden fetters rent, And, meteor-like, across the North, the fiery message sent; Over the breezy prairie lands, by bluff and lake it ran, Till Kansas bent his arm, and laughed to find himself a man; Then on, by cabin and by camp, by stony wastes and sands, It ran exulta
price of labor, of wood, and of cartage, rendered competition unwise; and the manufacture of bricks has ceased. Ship-building. Governor Winthrop sailed from Cowes, in England, on Thursday, April 8, 1630. On Saturday, June 12, he reached Boston Bay; and, on the 17th of that month, he makes the following record: Went up Mistick River about six miles. To this heroic and Christian adventurer belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western Worsea-serpent to have started from Charlestown for a visit to the country, and a small stream of tide-water to have followed him in his explorations, we can imagine him thus marking out by his many and sudden windings the course of our river from Boston Bay to the Pond,--rendering it thus serpentine in order to present the best accommodations to the greatest number of ship-builders. Where can a little river be found that will afford convenient sites for ten large ship-yards within one mile's dist
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: the Puritan divines, 1620-1720 (search)
es in the tangle of his writings, confused by the luxuriance of his Hebraic tropes, we can plainly discern the man, the most charitable, the most open-minded, the most modern, amongst the notable company of Puritan emigrants — the sincerest Christian among many who sincerely desired to be Christians. His own words most adequately characterize him: Liberavi animam meam: I have not hid within my breast, my souls belief. Naturally such a man could not get on with the Presbyterian leaders of Boston Bay; the social philosophies which divided them were fundamentally hostile; and the fate which Roger Williams suffered was prophetic of the lot that awaited later zealots in the democratic cause — to be outcast and excommunicate from respectable society. A man of far different mettle was old Thomas Hooker of Hartford. The sternest autocrat of them all, a leader worthy to measure swords with the redoubtable Hugh Peters himself, a man of mighty vigour and fervour of spirit who, to further hi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
piloting those infinitely various waters in the days before the war. The moonlight, one of his characters fancies, was brighter before the war; and he himself, travelled now and acquainted with glory, has experienced, he believes, nothing so satisfying to his inmost sense as his life in that epical calling with its manly rigours, its robust hilarity, its deep, wholesome, unreflective happiness. The spirit that, years before, inspired Emerson's blandly expressed desire to make Concord and Boston Bay as memorable as the storied places of Europe becomes in these pages clear, strong, resounding: it is the new national pride declaring the spiritual independence of America. Not in peevish envy, with no anxiety about the ultimate answer, out of his knowledge and the depths of his conviction Mark Twain cries: What are all the rivers of Damascus to the Father of Waters? The material for Following the Equator (1897) he collected under the strain of debt, ill health, and the fatigues of the
lled the Medford River. The names of the Mystic and Menotomy Rivers are apparently aboriginal designations, and like all Indian names probably describe the locality to which they were affixed. Trumbull gives the origin of the name Mystic, anciently written Mistick, as applied to the Medford River, thus: Tuk in Indian denotes a river whose waters are driven in waves by the tides or winds. With the adjectival misi, great, it forms misi-tuk—now written Mystic—the name of the great river of Boston Bay. The origin of the name Menotomy yet awaits explanation. The spellings of the word have been various. On Feb. 27, 1807, an act was passed to divide the town of Cambridge, and to incorporate the Westerly Parish therein as a separate town, by the name of West Cambridge. All that part of the town of Cambridge, heretofore known as the Second Parish, and as described within the following bounds: Beginning at Charlestown line where the little river intersects the same, and running
m, verie good and well likeing. And we brought with us about two hundred Passengers and Planters more, which by common consent of the old Planters were all combined together into one Body politicke, under the same Gouernour. There are in all of us both old and new Planters about three hundred, whereof two hundred of them are settled at Neihum-kek, now called Salem; and the rest have Planted themselves at Masathulets The name Massachusetts Bay was at first only applied to the waters of Boston Bay or Harbor, lying between Nahant and Point Allerton, and Massachusetts included only the country lying around this inner bay. Bay, beginning to build a Towne there which we doe call Cherton, or Charles Towne. On the neck of land called Mishawum, between Mistick and Charles Rivers, full of Indians, named Aberginians.—Prince's Annals, Sept. 13, 1628. We that are Settled at Salem make what hast we can to build Houses, so that within a short time we shall have a faire Towne. On July 20th, a
Black lead, a whole rock of, 35. Bleachery established, 132; new buildings at, 134; finishes fifteen tons of goods daily, 134. Blessing of the Bay, the first vessel built in the colony, 34. Block Island, 40, 41, 42. Boarding-houses at factory in good hands, 131. Boies, John: his cottage and paper-mill at Eden Vale, 92; location of, 130 n. 1; purchased by Boston Manufacturing Co., 92, 93, 130. Booths, people lying in, 22. Boston, settlement of, 2, 15; 23, 33, 60, 69. Boston Bay or Harbor at first called Massachusetts Bay, 11 n. 3. Boston Manufacturing Co. incorporated, 130; purchases property of Cotton & Wool Factory Co., 132. Boston Rock Hill, 28. Boston Watch Co. at Roxbury, 135; move to Waltham, 135; failure of, 136. Boundary questions between Watertown and New Town, 19. Bounty for killing squirrels and blackbirds, 98; to soldiers in Canada expedition, 101. Bowers, Mrs. Isaac: only domestic goods store in Boston, 131. Bowles, Mrs., Sarah,
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14., The ancient name Menotomy and the river of that name. (search)
p of Mass., 1633. The names of Mystic and Menotomy rivers are apparently aboriginal designations, and like all Indian names probably describe the locality to which they were affixed. Trumbull gives the origin of the name Mystic (anciently written Mistick,) as applied to the Medford river, thus: Tuk in Indian, denotes a river whose waters are driven in waves by the tide or winds. With the adjectival missi, great it forms missi-tuk, now written Mystic—the name of the great river of Boston Bay. The origin of the name Menotomy yet awaits explanation. The spellings of the word have been various. Newtowne soon took advantage of the privilege granted by the General Court, and on March 1st, 1635, Agreed with John Clark to make a suffcient Weir to Catch Al-wiffs vppon Monotomies River in the bounds of this Town before the 12th of Aprell next and shall sell and deliver vnto inhabetants of the Town and no other, except for bayte, all the Aylwifs he shall take at III s VI pr thous
main singular—and the circumstances attending them equally singular. Medford's first historian makes no mention thereof. He was then pastor of a Hingham church and was instrumental in securing, for a time, the coming of the second steamboat in Boston bay to that place in 1818. It may seem incredible today that a steamboat should traverse the entire length of Medford territory (greater then than now) without floating in either the river or the lake, itself but the third in Massachusetts waters, and prior to the second in Boston bay. But such was the case nearly a hundred years ago, though today no trace of water remains in its course of nearly five miles through old Medford town. Only one year earlier (July 27, 1817) had steam navigation from Boston to Salem made beginning, and proving a failure financially, the Massachusetts was sold, and on the way to Mobile was wrecked. Neither this first, nor the second and smaller steamboat called the Eagle, were built in the old Bay State
certainly appropriate. Trumbull gives the origin of Mistick thus— Tuk in Indian denotes a river whose waters are driven in waves by the tides or winds. With the adjective missi, great, it forms Missi-tuk, the name of the great river of Boston Bay. Even a cursory glance at the early maps, and especially at one of latest survey on which the ancient lines are drawn, Cambridge Historical Society Publication VII. will show the fitness of the aboriginal names, for of the two rivers the salvages told the Pilgrim scouts of, one was the long river and the other the great wave—and wind-driven river of Boston bay. But perhaps someone asks, Why Mystic river? We reply, The river has nothing mystical or mysterious, and the name as spelled, Mystic, is a misnomer. It has come to be thus commonly spelled because of the identical sound of the letters i and y, and the dropping of the k, which in time was superfluous to the c which the English had introduced. (Note also Merrimack—Mer<
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