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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
tune and a large house are required for the successful administration of these rites; and old Coke, by age, frankness of manner, and wide acquaintance with men, had become the chief of hosts. The closing of his gates will create a chasm in the Whig circle. Lord Fitzwilliam receives largely, but he does not know how to entertain; Lord Spencer does not choose even to receive; and Lord Lansdowne seems to content himself with his largess of hospitality in London and his Christmas rejoicings at Bowood. Old Coke will be missed very much. The other evening I received my annual discourse from Mrs. Howe Mrs. Judge Howe, of Cambridge. on the married state. She thinks me erring, and hopes that I shall yet come into the fold, though her hopes in me appear to diminish. She shall think more favorably, she says, of my condition when I am more taciturn on this most important subject. Have you read Edward Everett's speech? It is in the Advertiser of Friday (to-day). It is eloquent and ap
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
e island, and the exclusive character and tone assumed by the priests, who have every day, as they assure me, more and more the air of claiming superiority; especially where, as in the case of Edgeworthtown, the old priests have been removed, and Jesuits placed in their stead. After lunch,—there is only one service in the church,—Miss Edgeworth showed me a good many curious letters from Dumont,— one in particular, giving an account of Madame de Stael's visit, in 1813, to Lord Lansdowne at Bowood, for a week, when Mackintosh, Romilly, Schlegel, Rogers, and a quantity more of distinguished people were there; but Miss Edgeworth declined, not feeling apparently willing to live in a state of continual exhibition for so long a time. It was, however, very brilliant, and was most brilliantly described by Dumont. One thing amused me very much. Madame de Stael, who had just been reading the Tales of Fashionable Life,—then recently published,—with great admiration, said to Dumont of Miss
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
ho, as President of the Council, had been detained in the House of Lords, fighting with Brougham, whom he pronounced to be more able and formidable than at any previous period of his life. Lord Lansdowne seemed in excellent spirits. Not so Lady L. As she went in to dinner, surrounded by the most beautiful monuments of the arts, and sat down with Canova's Venus behind her, she complained to me, naturally and sincerely, of the weariness of a London life, and said that it was almost as bad at Bowood, with Lord Lansdowne always coming up to town to attend the Council But the talk was brilliant. Senior is always agreeable, but, by the side of Sydney Smith and Jeffrey, of course he put in no claim; and I must needs say, that when I saw Smith's free good-humor, and the delight with which everybody listened to him, I thought there were but small traces of the aristocratic oppression of which he had so much complained in the morning. Lord Jeffrey, too, seemed to be full of good things and g