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es, scampered off to the woods, followed by a volley of balls. One of them was evidently wounded, as he dropped his gun, (a double-barrelled shot gun,) and blood could be traced some distance. The party proceeded several miles, but finding that the rebels were encamped at Hampstead, nine miles from the Point, and that they had the evening before been reinforced by Walker's battery of three pieces of artillery, and that they were hourly expecting Col. Carey's Thirtieth Virginia, from Brooks' Station, it was deemed advisable to return. A portion of Company E had, however, in the mean time, surprised Mr. George Dent and his son, prominent Maryland rebels, for whom the authorities have long been searching. Mr. Dent was fully armed, and at first attempted to draw a revolver, but he saw resistance to be useless. He has long been connected with the Confederate signal service, and on his person were found the cards of several of the officers of the rebel navy, and a pass signed Brig.-G
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
, of the opinion that they will only try to check us at the river, and will not risk a general battle. camp near Brooks Station, Va., November 30, 1862. I received this evening your letter of the 28th, enclosing one from George. Son of Generdid not know it was Thanksgiving Day till I heard some one complain of not having a turkey for dinner. camp near Brooks Station, Va., December 2, 1862. Yesterday I rode over to headquarters and saw General Burnside. As usual, he was very civilurkey. I went over with him and had a very pleasant dinner, and in the evening a quiet game of whist. camp near Brooks Station, Va., December 3, 1862. As to McClellan's whitewashing of Meigs, if you will read his letter carefully, you will findicate. McClellan's letter to him from Harrison's Landing is most able, and his reply most impotent. camp near Brooks Station, Va., December 6, 1862. I have just sent you a telegram announcing that I had received from Washington notice by tel
of the enemy. It may be the time for this move has not yet arrived, but my only object now is to inform you that if you agree with my opinion as to the enemy's intentions, I can, at very short notice, march from here with three regiments of volunteers and two batteries of artillery. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, T. H. Holmes, Brig-Genl. Provisional Army. To Genl. S. Cooper, Adj.-Genl. C. S. A., Richmond. Headquarters Department of Fredericksburg, Brooks Station, June 18th, 1861. General,—Herewith enclosed you will please find a copy of a letter addressed to the Adjutant-General by me, and which was answered by General Lee, stating that the enemy's plans were not yet sufficiently developed to justify the adoption of my suggestions, and recommending, if my force could be divided, that I should erect a battery at Mathias Point, some thirty miles below here; from this you will see how utterly out of the question it is for me to send a regiment
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Connecticut Volunteers. (search)
2, thence to Newport News, Va., July 3-5 and duty there till August 1. Moved to Fredericksburg, Va., August 1-5 and duty there till August 31. Moved to Brooks' Station, thence to Washington, D. C., August 31-September 3. Maryland Campaign September-October Frederick, Md., September 12. Turner's Gap, South Mountain, Sep July 2, thence to Newport News, Va., July 3-5. Duty there till August 1. Moved to Fredericksburg August 1-6, and duty there till August 31. Moved to Brooks' Station, thence to Washington, D. C., August 31-September 3. Maryland Campaign September-October. Battle of South Mountain September 14. Battle of Antietam Sre, till October, 1862. At Tennallytown, building Fort Kearney, October 15-November 3. March to Thoroughfare Gap and Chantilly November 3-12. Duty at Brook's Station. Va., December, 1862, to April, 1863. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5.
ghfare Gap August 28. Battle of Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Centreville September 1. Duty in the Defenses of Washington September 11-October 13. Operations in Maryland and Virginia October 13-November 23. Camp at Brooks Station November 23-December 9. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. Camp near Fletcher's Chapel till April 28. Chancellorsville Campaign April 28-May 8. Operations at Fitzhugh's Crossing April 29-Mayr 6-16, 1862. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty near Sharpsburg, Md., till October 28. Moved to Warrenton, Va., October 28-November 7. Forced march to Rappahannock Station November 11. Duty there till November 19, and at Brooks Station till December 11. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24. 1863. At Falmouth and Belle Plains till April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Fitzhugh's Crossing April 29-30. Battle of Chan
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
December 10-16. Duty at Falmouth land Brook's Station till April, 1863. Mud March January 20, December 10-16. Duty at Falmouth and Brook's Station till April, 1863. Mud March January 20. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. At Brook's Station till April. Chancellorsville Campaign Mud March January 20-24, 1863. Duty at Brook's Station till April. Mustered out April 23, 186ck River August 15 (Co. H ). Moved to Brooks' Station, thence to Washington, D. C., August 31-Smouth, Va., October 30-November 19. At Brook's Station till December 10. Battle of Fredericks, December 10-15. Duty at Falmouth and Brooks' Station till April, 1863. Mud March January 20mouth, Va., October 26-November 22. At Brooks' Station November 22-December 8. Battle of Frednd duty there till August 30. Moved to Brooks' Station, thence to Washington, D. C., August 31-Smouth, Va., October 30-November 19. At Brooks' Station till December 10. Battle of Fredericks[1 more...]
up the Shenandoah Valley. Battle of Cross Keys June 8. Duty at Sperryville and Centreville, Va., till August. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Freeman's Ford August 22. Battle of Bull Run August 29-30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till December. Expedition from Centreville to Bristoe September 25-28. March to Fredericksburg, Va., December 10-16. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. At Brook's Station till April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 22. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee, to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. At Warrenton Junction July 25-August 6. Moved to Folly Island, S. C., Dept. of the South, August 6-12. Duty at Folly and Morris Islands, S. C., operating against Fort Sumpter and Charleston till January, 1864. Duty at Hilton Head, S. C., til
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
cker's Ferry and Berryville November 28-30. March to Fredericksburg, Va., December 10-15. Duty at Falmouth and Brooks' Station till April, 1863. Operations at Welford's, Kelly's and Beverly Fords April 14-15. Chancellorsville Campaign Ap 18-21; thence to Aquia Creek August 4-5. Operations on the Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers till September. At Brook's Station August 5-29. Destruction of bridges at Potomac Creek and Brook's Station September 4. Destruction of stores atBrook's Station September 4. Destruction of stores at Aquia Creek September 6. Battles of South Mountain September 14; Antietam September 16-17. Duty at Pleasant Valley, Md., till October 26. March to Lovettsville, Va., October 26-29; thence to Warrenton October 29-November 19. Battle of Fg, Md., till October 28. Moved to Warrenton October 28-November 7, thence to Falmouth, Va., November 11-19. At Brook's Station till December 11. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Burnside's 2nd Campaign, Mud March, January 20-24,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
ition to Hatteras Inlet and Roanoke Island, N. C., January 7-February 8, 1862. Battle of Roanoke Island February 9. Duty at Roanoke Island till March 11. Advance on New Berne March 11-13. Battle of New Berne March 14. Siege of Fort Macon March 23-April 26. Bombardment and capture of Fort Macon April 25-26. Duty at Beaufort and New Berne till July. Moved to Newport News, Va., July 6-8, thence to Fredericksburg August 3-6, and duty there till August 31. Moved to Brook's Station, thence to Washington, D. C., August 31-September 3. Maryland Campaign September-October. Battles of South Mountain September 14, and Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Pleasant Valley, Md., till October 30. Advance to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. Moved to Newport News, Va., February 8, thence to Suffolk March 13. Siege of Suffolk April 12-May 4. Nansemond River May 4. Re
man by the name of Price, who was engaged in running the blockade, and who was making arrangements to return to Baltimore, to purchase a fresh supply of goods. Together they went to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe journey through the rebel lines. Leaving Richmond, they went to Fredericksburg, where he stayed long enough to visit all the places of interest around that city, and in company with Mr. Price they went on to Brooks Station, the headquarters of General Holmes, with whom Price was intimately acquainted. After remaining several days, he left his companion, making his way to Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and from thence to Washington, where he reported to me. This first visit of Timothy Webster to Richmond was highly successful. Not only had he made many friends in that city, who would be of service to him on subsequent trips, but the information he derived was exceedingly valuable. He was able to repor
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