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dered the Thermopylae of the South without risking a general battle, it is hardly reasonable to suppose that he would have made a final stand upon the plains of Georgia. According to the following extract from an official telegram, even General Sherman was in doubt as to whether or not Johnston would fight for Atlanta: Van Horne, 11 Army C., vol. II, page 121. headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the field, at San House, Peach Tree road, five miles N. E. Of Buckhead, Ga., July 18, 1864: * * It is hard to realize that Johnston will give up Atlanta without a fight, but it may be so. Let us develop the truth. W. T. Sherman, Major General Commanding. My predecessor had evidently another scheme in reserve. General Forrest was required, with five thousand (5000) cavalry in Tennessee, to destroy Sherman's communications with Nashville,--at least, in so far as to hinder Sherman from receiving sufficient supplies for the maintenance of his Army. General
hat afternoon from his columns, in the direction of the Macon Railroad might have captured my predecessor on his retreat to Macon. Sherman says (vol. II, pages 71, 72): On the 18th all the Armies moved on a general right wheel, Thomas to Buckhead, forming line of battle facing Peach Tree creek; Schofield was on his left, and McPherson well on towards the railroad between Stone Mountain and Decatur, which he reached at 2 p. m. of that day, about four miles from Stone Mountain, and seven mis creek, forming a considerable obstacle to the passage of an army, runs in a northeasterly direction, emptying into the Chattahoochee river near the railroad crossing. The Army of the Ohio, under Schofield, was also about to cross east of the Buckhead road. The Army of the Tennessee, under McPherson, was moving on the Georgia Railroad at Decatur. Finding it impossible to hold Atlanta without giving battle, I determined to strike the enemy while attempting to cross this stream. My troops we
eft resting near the Pace's Ferry road, and the right covering Atlanta. On the morning of the i9th the dispositions of the enemy were substantially as follows: The Army of the Cumberland, under Thomas, was in the act of crossing Peach Tree creek. This creek forming a considerable obstacle to the passage of an Army, runs in a northeasterly direction, emptying into the Chattahoochee river near the railroad crossing. The Army of the Ohio, under Schofield, was also about to cross east of the Buckhead road. The Army of the Tennessee, under McPherson, was moving on the Georgia Railroad at Decatur. Feeling it impossible to hold Atlanta without giving battle, I determined to strike the enemy while attempting to cross this stream. My troops were disposed as follows: Stewart's Corps on the left; Hardee's in the centre, and Cheatham's on the right, entrenched. My object was to crush Thomas's Army before he could fortify himself, and then turn upon Schofield and McPherson. To do this, Chea
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 19 (search)
to hold an important bridge and ford at that place. About three miles out from the Chattahoochee the main road forked, the right branch following substantially the railroad, and the left one leading straight for Atlanta, via Paice's Ferry and Buckhead. We found the latter unoccupied and unguarded, and the Fourth Corps (Howard's) reached the river at Paice's Ferry. The right-hand road was perfectly covered by the tete-du-pont before described, where the resistance was very severe, and for soPowers's and Paice's, by pontoon-bridges; Schofield moving out toward Cross Keys, and McPherson toward Stone Mountain. We encountered but little opposition except by cavalry. On the 18th all the armies moved on a general right wheel, Thomas to Buckhead, forming line of battle facing Peach-Tree Creek; Schofield was on his left, and McPherson well over toward the railroad between Stone Mountain and Decatur, which he reached at 2 P. M. of that day, about four miles from Stone Mountain, and seven
ncamped for the night. Distance marched, nineteen (19) miles. November 19.--Started at five A. M., passed through Madison at daylight, halted at twelve M. at Buckhead, for dinner; started again at one P. M., and at five P. M. we halted at Jordan's Plantation. The Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania veteran volunteer infantry here assi (20) miles, and bivouacked near Madison, Georgia, at half-past 5 P. M. 19th. Started at five A. M., marched about ten (10) miles and bivouacked, just beyond Buckhead and near the Appalachee River, at four P. M. During the afternoon the regiment destroyed about eight hundred (800) yards of railroad track, on the Augusta Railrok destroyed. 19th. Moved at five A. M.; passed through Madison. The division being on special duty, several miles of railroad track destroyed; also depot at Buckhead. Cavalry burned railroad bridge over Oconee River. 20th. Moved at seven A. M.; bivouacked at Demming's Mills. 21st. Moved at eight A. M., and marched to
the fourteenth of November last, yet displayed the most admirable gallantry during the campaign, but more especially at Buckhead and Reynolds's plantation. The service is not ornamented with more worthy captains. Captain Dalzell and Lieutenant Ctly in the left arm, at Waynesboro, December fourth, 1864. Company A: private J. R. Strickland, killed in action near Buckhead, November twenty-eighth, 1864. Company B: Sergeant A. C. Smith, killed on the march from Waynesboro to Buckhead, NoveBuckhead, November twenty-eighth, 1864; Corporals A. D. Lawrence, B. C. Bowen, and private James Miller, taken prisoners near Griswold, Georgia, November twentieth, 1864; Corporal M. L. Murphy and private J. B. Carpenter, taken prisoners near Cypress Swamp, DecembColvin, missing in action at Cypress Swamp, December seventh, 1864; private George Leinback, wounded in the right leg at Buckhead, November twenty-eighth, 1864. Company G: Quartermaster Jacob N. Jennings, wounded in the thigh at Cypress Swamp, Dec
nty (20) miles. Friday, November eighteenth, took up line of march at half-past 5 A. M., halting soon after in the road to allow wagon-train to pass; started again at half-past 7 A. M., halting in the village of Rutledge for dinner. Encamped within a mile of Madison at half-past 6 P. M., having marched about eighteen (18) miles. Saturday, November nineteenth, left camp at five A. M.; marched through Madison at daybreak in a moderate rain, which ceased about seven o'clock. Halted near Buckhead for dinner. At four P. M., encamped for the night. After stacking arms, proceeded to tear up track on the Augusta Railroad; working with the division about two hours and a half. Distance marched this day, about fifteen (15) miles. Sunday, November twentieth, fell in at half-past 7 A. M., and marched south from the railroad, on the west bank of the Oconee River. Encamped at five P. M., after having marched about fifteen (15) miles. Monday, November twenty-first, left our encampment
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
ff's Station July 4. Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek, July 19-20.Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. ff's Station July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. ff's Station July 4. Chattahoochie River June 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
5-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jon5-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Utoy Creek August 5-75-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jon Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Utoy Creek August 5-7
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground, July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Moved to Nashville, T. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station or Smyrna Camp Ground July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Buckhead or Nancy's Creek July 18. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Operations against H
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