Your search returned 109 results in 27 document sections:

1 2 3
hat most of the glory claimed for him in his recent campaign justly belongs to Colonel William A. Phillips, whose heroic action through six months of extraordinary trials, made possible the recent achievements of our arms in the Indian country. A detachment of soldiers which has just come from Southwest Missouri, state that Colonel M. La Rue Harrison, of the First Kansas cavalry, had a fight on the 21st with the rebel forces of Colonels Coffey and Brown, near the mouth of Buffalo Creek, Newton County, Missouri, and killed five of the enemy and wounded several others. This recent action indicates that Colonel Harrison is improving in fighting qualities. His precipitate retreat from Fayetteville last spring, when he was expected to co-operate with Colonel Phillips, was not by any means very creditable to him, and if what has been reported in regard to the matter be true, should have subjected him to censure by court martial. Perhaps he has determined to wipe out that little stain
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 45 (search)
hang upon his flanks, and retard his progress by every possible means. I am informed the brigades from Southwest Virginia have joined Wheeler. President's dispatch of 23d just received. Braxton Bragg, General. When I carried this dispatch to the Secretary I found him sitting in close conference with Mr. Hunter, both with rather lugubrious faces. Another dispatch from Bragg: Augusta, Nov. 25th, 8 P. M. The enemy has crossed the Oconee; was met this morning, in force, at Buffalo Creek, near Sandersville. His movements from that point will determine whether he designs attacking here or on Savannah. Hon. I. T. Leach from North Carolina, yesterday introduced submission resolutions in the House of Representatives, which were voted down, of course,--Messrs. Logan and Turner, of North Carolina, however, voting for them. A party of that sort is forming, and may necessitate harsh measures. The President orders detail of fifty men for express company. Ifeared so!
int now; so, resolving to throw my cavalry again across his path, and hold him till the infantry could overtake him, I directed everything on Appomattox depot, recalling Crook the night of the 7th to Prospect Station, while Merritt camped at Buffalo Creek, and Mackenzie made a reconnoissance along the Lynchburg railroad. At break of day, April 8, Merritt and Mackenzie united with Crook at Prospect Station, and the cavalry all moved then toward Appomattox depot. Hardly had it started when re, after we had captured Appomattox Station and established a line intercepting Lee: cavalry headquarters, April 8, 1865-9:20 P. M. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, Commanding Armies of the U. S. General: I marched early this morning from Buffalo Creek and Prospect Station on Appomattox Station, where my scouts had reported trains of cars with supplies for Lee's army. A short time before dark General Custer, who had the advance, made a dash at the station, capturing four trains of supplies
gwood, in Preston County, thence to Morgantown, which place they reached on Monday, at two P. M. Tuesday morning they left Morgantown, and came up on the east bank of the river to within seven or eight miles of this place, where they were met by another body, which crossed the railroad subsequently. The whole force then returned to Morgantown, crossed the river, spread out over the country, taking every good horse they could find, and concentrated here on Wednesday morning. They crossed Buffalo Creek — which flows from the west and enters the river a mile below town — at Barracksville, and approached town on the Mannington pike. The first positive information of their number and whereabouts, was received from Morgantown on Monday evening. Their number was estimated by a gentleman who witnessed their entree, at five thousand. Before this news came, and while all was vague rumor and perplexing uncertainty, many of our fighting men whom we relied upon as certain to die in the last d
t that place. I accompanied the Twentieth corps from Milledgeville to Sandersville, approaching which place on the twenty-fifth, we found the bridges across Buffalo Creek burned, which delayed us three hours. The next day we entered Sandersville, skirmishing with Wheeler's cavalry, which offered little opposition to the advance On the twenty-fourth, the march was resumed, and the divisions encamped near Gum Creek; and on the twenty-fifth, after some delay, to rebuild the bridges over Buffalo Creek and Swamp, the head of the column encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry was driven away by Colonel R of march; Cavalry, First, Second, and Third divisions. The cavalry had a skirmish with Wheeler's cavalry.--Weather: Fine.--Road: Good, except the crossing of Buffalo Creek, the bridges of the dam being destroyed.--Supplies: Not so plenty; poor country.--Distance: Eight miles. November 26. Order of march; First, Second, and
estroyed, as well as salt and other public property. The report of Colonel Hawley, commander of post, forwarded herewith, will give the details of this property. The railroad depot, two arsenals, a powder magazine, and other public buildings and shops were burned. The railroad track for five miles toward Gordon was destroyed. On the twenty-fourth, the march was resumed, and the divisions encamped near Gum Creek; and on the twenty-fifth, after some delay, to rebuild the bridges over Buffalo Creek and Swamp, the head of the column encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry was driven away by Colonel Robinson's brigade just as we were going into camp. On the following morning, (twenty-sixth,) two regiments of Carman's brigade, Jackson's division, drove away the rebel cavalry, and the corps moved rapidly into Sandersville, entering simultaneously with the Fourteenth corps, upon a road on our left. In the afternoon, the First
November 25. Order of march; Cavalry, First, Second, and Third divisions. The cavalry had a skirmish with Wheeler's cavalry.--Weather: Fine.--Road: Good, except the crossing of Buffalo Creek, the bridges of the dam being destroyed.--Supplies: Not so plenty; poor country.--Distance: Eight miles.
actory or Little River, (15) fifteen miles. November twenty-first, marched at daylight, crossing Mud Creek, and camping at Cedar Creek, marching eighteen miles. November twenty-second, in camp. November twenty-third, moved at daylight, and camped near Milledgeville, fifteen miles. November twenty-fourth, left camp at ten A. M., passing through Milledgeville and crossing the Oconee River, and camping at Town Creek, nine miles. November twenty-fifth, moved at daylight, crossing Buffalo Creek, and camping at Cagy Creek, marching twelve miles. Twenty-sixth, moved at daylight for Sandersville; about four miles west of that place, my foragers were met by Wheeler's cavalry, who were disposed to resist their advance. The foragers were soon formed and deployed as skirmishers, and steadily drove the enemy to and through Sandersville, never checking the advance of the column. As a precautionary measure, the One Hundred and Thirteenth Ohio, (Captain Jones commanding,) of the Second
November 25.--Marched four miles east to Buffalo Creek, passing through Hebron P. O., thence fourix hours by the burning of the bridge over Buffalo Creek by the enemy. Whole distance marched, ninmn reached Hebron Post-Office at eight and Buffalo Creek at nine A. M. Over Buffalo Creek, a wide sen I moved steadily forward until reaching Buffalo Creek, where I found the troops and trains of thious, passing through Hebron and coming to Buffalo Creek. Here we found eight (8) bridges burnt, w. M., Twenty-ninth train guard; arrived at Buffalo Creek, found the bridge destroyed. Parked the tance of division. Moved through Hebron to Buffalo Creek, where our advance exchanged a few shots w. until four P. M., when we again moved to Buffalo Creek, a distance of about one mile, and went in seven A. M. with the brigade, marching to Buffalo Creek, when we encamped at three P. M. 26th. ched six miles, and camped on west side of Buffalo Creek. 26th. Breaking camp at eight A. M., r[12 more...]
, during the day. 20th, 21st, and 22d, were passed in marching. 23d. Reached and encamped in the city of Milledgeville. 24th. Marched at nine o'clock A. M., moving on the road to Sandersville. 25th. Moved forward a few miles to Buffalo Creek. Over this stream we threw a pontoonbridge, and also built one small trestle-bridge during the night. 26th. Took up the pontoon-bridge and marched the same day to Sandersville, a distance of ten miles. 27th. Sent Major Downey with twes north of Milledgeville. 20th. We put a pontoon-bridge across Little River, of ten boats, making two hundred and twenty feet of bridge, during the night of the twentieth November. 24th. We put a pontoon-bridge across the channel of Buffalo Creek. This bridge took three boats, and was eighty feet in length. I also repaired five bridges at this point, by repairing the trestles that had been burned off, and using balk and chess for covering. These bridges were three hundred and sixty
1 2 3