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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
on was gained that Lieutenant Payne had struck Buford's Brigade of Federal cavalry, who, having captured some of Jackson's stragglers, had heard from them, for the first time, of his. movement. The next day General Lee reached Thoroughfare gap, but did not succeed in forcing a passage through it till late in the evening. During the entire day he was uneasy for Jackson's safety, and, in the evening, requested Lieutenant Payne to send him a soldier who was acquainted with the passes of Bull Run mountains. The man was stripped of all the indicia of a soldier, and, dressed in the garb of a countryman, was mounted on a lame horse and a wagon saddle. Thus equipped, he was started with a dispatch for Jackson, concealed on his person, and was directed, at every hazard, and with all celerity, to deliver it. Later, Lee directed Lieutenant Payne to make a reconnoissance to the rear of the force opposing him at Thoroughfare gap, and report without delay. Taking with him a party of five or
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 9: Second battle of Manassas. (search)
gust day, Jackson went into bivouac at Salem, a small village on the Manassas Gap Railroad, having marched in the heat and dust twenty-six miles. But one man among twenty thousand knew where they were going. The troops knew an important movement was on hand, which involved contact with the enemy, and possibly a reissue of supplies. At early dawn the next day the march was resumed at right angles to the course of the day before, following the Manassas Gap Railroad and passing through Bull Run Mountains at Thoroughfare Gap. At Gainesville, Stuart, with Robertson and Fitz Lee's brigades of cavalry, overtook Jackson, whose subsequent movements were greatly aided and influenced by the admirable manner in which the cavalry was employed and managed by Stuart. On reaching the vicinity of Manassas Junction, his objective point, Jackson inclined to the right and intersected the main railroad in Pope's rear at Bristoe Station, four miles closer to Pope, where he halted for the night, having
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 25: the battle of Bull's Run, (search)
t battery with Company G of the Second United States Artillery. The foregoing was compiled from the General Orders of the Commander-in-chief, dated 8th of July, 1861. commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals Daniel Tyler and Theodore Runyon, and Colonels David Hunter, Samuel P. Heintzelman, and Dixon S. Miles. The Confederate force against which this army was to move was distributed along Bull's Run, This is an inconsiderable stream, which rises in the range of hills known as Bull's Run Mountains. See map on page 586. It empties into the Occoquan River about twelve miles from the Potomac. from Union Mill, where the Orange and Alexandria Railway crosses that stream, to the Stone Bridge of the Warrenton Turnpike, the interval being about eight miles. The disposition of the Confederate forces was as follows:-- Ewell's brigade occupied a position near the Union Mill Ford, and was composed of the Fifth and Seventh Alabama, and Fifth Louisiana Volunteers, with four 12-pound h
aching there after midnight. Up again by day-dawn, and still on, along the Manassas Gap road, meeting crowds — all welcoming, cheering, staring with blank amazement. So all day Tuesday, through White Plains, Haymarket, Thoroughfare Gap, in Bull Run Mountains, Gainesville, to Bristow station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad--making the difference from Amosville to Bristow (between forty-five and fifty miles) within the forty-eight hours. We burned up at Bristow two or three railway-trains, a ridge running from Sudley Church Ford to the Warrenton turnpike. We drove them off, and on Friday morning we held the ridge, in front of which runs an incomplete railroad — cut and embankment. Now, we had made a circuit from the Gap in Bull Run Mountains around to the Junction and Centreville, breaking up the railroad and destroying their stores, and returned to within six miles of the Gap, through which Longstreet must come. The enemy disputed his passage and delayed him till late in the
aching there after midnight. Up again by day-dawn, and still on, along the Manassas Gap road, meeting crowds — all welcoming, cheering, staring with blank amazement. So all day Tuesday, through White Plains, Haymarket, Thoroughfare Gap, in Bull Run Mountains, Gainesville, to Bristow station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad--making the difference from Amosville to Bristow (between forty-five and fifty miles) within the forty-eight hours. We burned up at Bristow two or three railway-trains, a ridge running from Sudley Church Ford to the Warrenton turnpike. We drove them off, and on Friday morning we held the ridge, in front of which runs an incomplete railroad — cut and embankment. Now, we had made a circuit from the Gap in Bull Run Mountains around to the Junction and Centreville, breaking up the railroad and destroying their stores, and returned to within six miles of the Gap, through which Longstreet must come. The enemy disputed his passage and delayed him till late in the
road station. Pope directed an attack upon the forces which had crossed the river, hoping to cut them off, but the enemy escaped with no great loss. The annexed telegram from General Pope, marked Exhibit No. 3, and dated the twenty-fifth, gives his views of the condition of affairs at that date. The enemy, however, had not fallen back, as he supposed, but on being repulsed at Waterloo Bridge, had moved further up the river and entered the valley which lies between the Blue Ridge and Bull Run Mountains. The object of this movement was evidently to get in Pope's rear, and cut off his supplies from Washington. Anticipating this danger, I had telegraphed to Gen. Pope on the twenty-third: By no means expose your railroad communication with Alexandria. It is of the utmost importance in sending your supplies and reenforcements. On the twenty-sixth I telegraphed: If possible to attack the enemy in flank do so, but the main object now is to ascertain his position. From this time till
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
hitherto been skeptical. If this should prove true, we will have to rush after them. I had almost rather they would come here and save us marches. I am in pretty good spirits—a little disgusted at the smallness of my corps, only ten thousand men, but I believe they will do as much as any equal numbers. camp at Aldie, Va., June 23, 1863. Yesterday General Pleasanton drove the enemy's cavalry across what is called the Loudoun Valley, or the valley formed by the South Mountain and Bull Run Mountains. He did not find any infantry in Loudoun Valley, and reports Lee's army about Winchester, in the Valley of the Shenandoah, and that A. P. Hill, whom we left at Fredericksburg, is coming up the valley to join Lee. When Hill joins Lee, he will have a large army, numerically much superior to ours, and he will then, I presume, develop his plans. I have seen a paper now and then, and have been greatly amused at the evident fears of the good people of the North, and the utter want of pro
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1863 (search)
(Detachments). Union loss, 50 missing. Aug. 9: Skirmish, Welford's FordMASSACHUSETTS--1st Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--1st Cavalry (Detachments). Union loss, 17 missing. Aug. 9: Skirmish, Brandy Station(No Reports.) Aug. 11: Affair, AnnandaleCapture of Union wagon train by Mosby. Aug. 11-19: Expedition from Portsmouth to Edenton, N. C.NEW YORK--7th Cavalry (1st Mounted Rifles). PENNSYLVANIA--11th Cavalry (Cos. "G," "I," "K"). Union loss, 1 killed, 1 wounded. Total, 2. Aug. 14: Scout in Bull Run MountainsNEW YORK--2d Cavalry (Detachment). Aug. 14: Scout to WinchesterNEW YORK--1st Cavalry (Detachment). Aug. 15-19: Scout from Centreville to AldieMASSACHUSETTS--2d Cavalry. NEW YORK--2d Cavalry (Detachments). Aug. 15: Skirmish, Hartwood ChurchMICHIGAN--7th Cavalry. Aug. 15: Action, Beverly FordMAINE--1st Cavalry. Aug. 16: Skirmish, Fall's ChurchNEW YORK--111th Infantry. Aug. 18: Skirmish, Bristoe StationPENNSYLVANIA--6th Cavalry. Aug. 22: Skirmish, Stafford Court HouseNEW YORK--9th C
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
ullitt's Bayou, La. 155, F6 Bull Pasture Mountain, Va. 85, 1; 116, 1; 137, C2 Engagement, May 8, 1862. See McDowell, Va. Bull Run, Va. 3, 1, 3, 2; 5, 1, 5, 7; 7, 1; 21, 13; 22, 1, 22, 3, 22, 4, 22, 5, 22, 6, 22, 7; 23, 1, 23, 2; 74, 1; 100, 1; 111, 1; 135-A; 137, A7 Battles: July 21, 1861 3, 1, 3, 2; 5, 1, 5, 7 Aug. 30, 1862 22, 1; 111, 1 Bull Run (Va.) Campaign, July 16-22, 1861: Bull Run, Va., July 21, 1861 3, 1, 3, 2; 5, 1, 5, 7 Bull Run Mountains, Va. 7, 1; 22, 5, 22, 6; 43, 7; 100, 1; 137, A6 Bull's Gap, Tenn. 24, 3; 142, C5 Bulltown, W. Va. 140, G10; 141, B12 Bunker Hill, W. Va. 27, 1; 43, 7; 69, 1; 74, 1; 81, 4; 82, 3, 82, 7; 85, 1; 100, 1; 116, 2 Burke's Mill, Ga. 48, 1; 57, 2 Burke's Station, Va. 7, 1; 74, 1; 86, 15; 100, 1; 117, 1; 137, G5 Burkesville, Ky. 9, 2; 118, 1; 150, E9; 171 Burkeville, Va. 16, 1; 100, 1; 135-A; 137, G6 Burlington, W. Va. 82, 3; 84, 4; 100, 1; 135
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Events leading up to the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ge, east of the latter, and General Stuart had discretion to use the fords east of the Blue Ridge, but he had no discretion to use any ford that would place the enemy's army between him and the troops of General Ewell. A Misconstruction. The report of General Stuart of his operations in this campaign states that he had submitted to General Lee a plan of leaving a brigade or two, to use his own language, in my present front, and passing through Hopewell, or some other gap in Bull Run Mountains, attain the enemy's rear, pass between his main body and Washington, and cross into Maryland, joining our army north of the Potomac. The commanding general wrote me, authorizing this move, if I deemed it practicable, and also what instructions should be given the officer in command of the two brigades left in front of the army. He also notified me that one column would move via Gettysburg, the other by Carlisle, towards the Susquehanna, and directed me, after crossing, to proceed w
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