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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 10-Sept. 9, 1864.Wheeler's raid to North Georgia and East Tennessee, with combats at Dalton (August 14-15) and other points. Aug. 15, 1864.Skirmishes at Sandtown and Fairburn. Aug. 18-22, 1864.Kilpatrick's raid from Sandtown to Lovejoy's Station, with combats at Camp Creek (18th), Red Oak (19th), Flint River (19th), Jonesborough (19th), and Lovejoy's Station (20th). Aug. 22, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 26-Sept. 4, 1864.Operations at the Chattahoochee railroad bridge and at Pace's and Turner's Ferries, with skirmishes. Aug. 27, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 29, 1864.Skirmish near Red Oak. Aug. 30, 1864.Skirmish near E
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
a, about two miles below the railroad bridge, and his left abreast the town. General Thomas came up on his left facing Camp Creek, and General Schofield broke his way through the dense forest to General Thomas' left. Johnston had left Dalton and Gee foresight of the rebel chief. At all events, on the 14th of May, we found the rebel army in a strong position behind Camp Creek, occupying the forts at Resaca and his right on some high chestnut hills, to the north of the town. I at once ordered ove Kingston, if possible, and with the main Army I pressed against Resaca at all points. General McPherson got across Camp Creek, near its mouth, and made a lodgment close up to the enemy's works on hills that commanded, with short-range artillery,vement continued, the Army of the Tennessee drawing out and moving rapidly by a circuit well toward Sandtown and across Camp Creek; the Army of the Cumberland, below Utoy Creek, General Schofield, remaining in position. This was effected with the lo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
passing in rear of the Army of the Tennessee, bivouacked next night on Utoy Creek. Before the movement began its left had rested on the Decatur road. August 26, the movement of the Army of the Cumberland still going on, and at dark the left wing of the Army of the Tennessee was swung to the rear upon its right and occupied the position previously prepared for it. August 27, all the army in motion except the Army of the Ohio. The Army of the Cumberland was placed in position along Camp Creek, covering all the roads leading from Mount Gilead Church toward East Point and Red Oak. The Army of the Tennessee was thrown further to the right, but close enough to keep up communication. It covered all the roads leading toward Fairburn. But little resistance was offered to our advance. The troops intrenched their position every night. This was made a rule from the time the campaign commenced, and was continued until the close of the war whenever the proximity of the enemy rendered i
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
injuring no one. While my pickets were preparing to withdraw, as the march was commenced that morning, the enemy charged them with a strong line of skirmishers, but they were handsomely repulsed and driven back with a loss to them of 4 killed and 2 captured, and with no loss to me; the lines were then withdrawn without further molestation from him. The command bivouacked that evening on the south side and near Utoy Creek. On the 27th the division was marched to Mount Gilead Church, near Camp Creek, and intrenched the position, in which it remained during the night. On the 28th the division marched to near the West Point and Atlanta Railroad at Red Oak Station, and took up a position, which was fortified. On the 29th, by your order, I sent the Second Brigade (Colonel Taylor) to destroy the railroad toward Atlanta, and three regiments under Colonel Bennett, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, toward West Point for the same purpose. The destruction of the road was performed in the most e
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
ines and positions of regiments this brigade substantially remained at the same position in the siege of Atlanta from the morning of the 22d of July until the night of the 25th of August. We received orders and marched to the right, seven miles south across Proctor's Creek, and rested until daylight on the morning of August 26, when, starting at 8 a. m., we moved with corps seven miles south across Utoy Creek and camped for the night. August 27, marched four miles south with the corps to Camp Creek and camped. August 28, marched three miles southeast to Red Oak Station, on West Point railroad, striking this road twelve miles southwest of the Atlanta. August 29, lay still and fortified. August 30, marched to Shoal Creek, distance five miles. August 31, the Army of the Tennessee fighting to-day in front and on the west of Jonesborough, Ga. Our corps advanced east, met cavalry behind works on the east bank of the Flint River. My brigade formed-Ninth Indiana, Eighty-fourth Illinois
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 31 (search)
In afternoon returned to the works we had left in the morning. From 21st to 24th, inclusive, remained in works. Some wounded on skirmish line. On 25th marched at dark, following the Thirtieth Indiana. Withdrew from our works and marched around to the left. Bivouacked for the night after marching six miles. On 26th marched at 10 a. m.; skirmnishing in our rear. Regiment marched as flankers for a short time, and then marched in road, Traveled six miles during day. On 27th marched to Camp Creek, where the regiment went on picket duty. On 28th marched in advance of brigade five miles and bivouacked for the night. On 31st marched one mile, when we came upon the enemy. Regiment was formed in second line on left of Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania for a short time, and then advanced by the flank, the enemy having been driven. Bivouacked for the night near the Macon and Western Railroad, having marched during the day six miles. On 1st of Septembe: marched, following Thirtieth Indiana,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 34 (search)
s ordered to hold at all hazards, which I did until relieved, without firing a gun. Then, by order of the general commanding brigade, I moved my regiment to the right through the lines of the Sixteenth Army Corps. Went into camp at sunset. Moved my command with the brigade at 8 a. m. August 27, marched until about 12 m., at which time my regiment was formed in line of battle on the right of the front line of the brigade, which was in rear of the Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, near Camp Creek, Ga. My command was ordered to be ready to move at 7 a. m. August 28. Moved at 2 p. m. with the brigade; went into camp at sundown. My regiment was formed in line of battle in center of the front line of the brigade. On the morning of the 29th of August the general commanding ordered me to throw up a line of breast-works on the left of the front line of the brigade. On the morning of the 30th I was ordered to move my regiment with the brigade at 6 a. m. Moved to the right, crossing th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
found to be impregnable to attack. August 25, evacuated our lines before Atlanta about midnight without annoyance from the enemy, this division bringing up the rear of the corps, and marched to Proctor's Creek. August 26, crossed Proctor's Creek, no enemy following but a thin skirmish line; crossed Utoy Creek and encamped, this division leading. August 27, left at 3 p. m., bringing up the rear of the corps and guarding the baggage train; passing the rest of the corps in camp, and crossed Camp Creek, covering the road to Fairburn. August 28, moved second in order of march, and took position near Red Oak, on the West Point railroad. August 29, remained in camp. August 30, marched first in order, and took position at Mann's house. Our march this day was much impeded by the Fourteenth Corps. August 31, crossed Crooked Creek at the mill; remained there to guard the trains and artillery, while the rest of the corps moved forward to strike the railroad. Toward evening took up position o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
out with sixty rounds of cartridges and three days rations, moving to the rear and right, being on the left of the corps. The Twenty-seventh Illinois went to the rear to-day to be mustered out of service. After a tedious night's march, we halted about daybreak for breakfast. Formed line of battle at 8 a. m. and commenced fortifying. Moved to the right soon after; marched eight miles and camped on Utoy Creek. August 27, marched at 2 p. m. as rear guard, made about five miles and crossed Camp Creek, going into position on right of General Wood's division; occupied two hills in advance of the line and fortified. Marched at 4 p. m. of 28th about four miles, and camped near Montgomery railroad. On the 29th advanced our lines about half a mile and fortified. August 30, marched at 6 a. m. and crossed the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak. Moved east about six miles and formed line of battle on left of Kimball's division. On the 31st advanced several miles toward Macon railroad, form
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
ad, which we followed until 4 p. m., when we went into camp, having marched about twelve miles. At 8 a. m. on the 27th we marched with the division, moving south on a neighborhood road in the direction of the West Point railroad to a point near Camp Creek, 6 miles from East Point, where, the cavalry covering our movement meeting with considerable resistance, we halted for the night and barricaded our front. At 6 p. m. on the 28th moved with the division on a road crossing Camp Creek and interseCamp Creek and intersecting the West Point railroad near and north of Red Oak Station, bivouacking on both sides of the road, having marched about three miles. On the 29th, the Second and Third Brigades having been detached for the purpose of assisting in the destruction of the West Point railroad, this brigade took position on the left of Newton's division, our left refused, and built strong barricades. Later in the day the Twentythird Corps came into position on our left. August 30, at 6 a. m. marched with the di
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