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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The surrender of Harper's Ferry. (search)
llery was situated. In the rear of this line eastward, and in the upper part of the town, was an earth-work known as Camp Hill. Loudoun Heights (east of the Shenandoah) were not occupied by our troops. The troops constituting the garrison wered, thence at a right angle to the Shenandoah, a distance in all of at least a mile and a half, 7000 men; in the work at Camp Hill, about 800; while the remainder, about 1000, guarded the bridges and other points on the rivers. The distance from Mnd of the forces in this quarter, ordered the massing of the artillery there and the movements of the regiments holding Camp Hill to the front. These orders, as I afterward learned, were countermanded by Colonel Miles, who deemed it necessary to retteries of the enemy were placed, were 300 to 600 feet high. The elevation of Bolivar Heights is about 300 feet, while Camp Hill and the town of Harper's Ferry are still lower. Thus all our movements of men or guns during the engagements of the 14
our troops from Bolivar Heights, and take up a second line of defence on the heights known as Camp Hill, immediately above the town of Harper's Ferry. The occupation of this inner line presented a as they advanced down the declivity of Bolivar Heights into the valley which separates it from Camp Hill. They would thus be exposed for a considerable time to a heavy fire from this formidable batte great elevation would enable it to throw shells directly over the heads of our own forces on Camp Hill into the faces of the advancing foe. With the force rendered by this contraction of our front on the Maryland side. Gen. Slough's brigade at the same time fell back to the new position on Camp Hill, and when morning dawned our batteries, (companies K and L, of the First New-York artillery,) to attack us, about dark on Friday evening, in the storm. Gen. Slough opened upon them from Camp Hill with Crounse's and part of Reynolds's battery, and Lieut. Daniels, from battery Stanton, on Ma
and Anderson shelling from the Maryland side. The enemy resisted with great spirit, and the guns, of which they had a large number in position, were handled with great effect upon the columns of Gen. Jackson, which had to approach them through an open space, where their guns had unobstructed play. The shells from Walker's batteries and the impetuous attacks of Jackson's men rendered their intrenchments on Bolivar Heights too warm for the enemy, and late in the evening they fell back to Camp Hill, one mile in the rear of the Bolivar fortifications. Here they had their heavy guns planted and strong intrenchments thrown up, but within easy range of the batteries of McLaws and Anderson on the opposite heights. Night coming on, the struggle ceased, Jackson's forces occupying the deserted intrenchments on the hills of Bolivar. That night old Stonewall sent a message to Gen. Walker that his forces were in possession of the enemy's first line of intrenchments, and that with God's bless
and Anderson shelling from the Maryland side. The enemy resisted with great spirit, and the guns, of which they had a large number in position, were handled with great effect upon the columns of Gen. Jackson, which had to approach them through an open space, where their guns had unobstructed play. The shells from Walker's batteries and the impetuous attacks of Jackson's men rendered their intrenchments on Bolivar Heights too warm for the enemy, and late in the evening they fell back to Camp Hill, one mile in the rear of the Bolivar fortifications. Here they had their heavy guns planted and strong intrenchments thrown up, but within easy range of the batteries of McLaws and Anderson on the opposite heights. Night coming on, the struggle ceased, Jackson's forces occupying the deserted intrenchments on the hills of Bolivar. That night old Stonewall sent a message to Gen. Walker that his forces were in possession of the enemy's first line of intrenchments, and that with God's bless
k, at Roxbury line, a gate put up, 1640 Roxbury gate repaired, 1650 Roxbury gate again repaired, 1696 Embankment raised and extended, 1706 Embankment rebuilt of brick and stone, 1710 Had new gates and batteries, 1710 Repaired and greatly strengthened, 1742 Gates thrown open by Washington's Army, Mar. 17, 1776 Substantially improved by volunteer labor, 1814 Discontinued; surrounding grounds raised, 1832 Old ruins dug up in building a sewer, 1860 Fort Strong, Camp Hill, Noddle's Island, built, 1776 Repaired by volunteer labor, 1814 Fortifications Fort Strong. Gone to decay and removed, 1833 Winthrop began to be built, 1808 Warren and George's Island, building began, 1833 Works said to be completed, 1850 Rebel prisoners confined at Warren, 1862 Forgeries The Miller sensation on State street, Dec., 1847 The Jackson swindle sensation, Dec., 1875 The E. D. Winslow swindle sensation, Jan., 1876 Forest Garden West Roxbu
of a flag of the Confederate States. Very many ladies, inspired by that patriotism which has always appertained to the sex when their country was in danger, attended on the occasion, as did that spirited young corps of citizen soldiery, the Southern Guard, Capt. J. F. Childrey, who, with the soul-stirring accompaniment of marshal music, marched from their drill-room at 4 o'clock, to meet their fellow-citizens. The site selected was a beautiful eminence on the farm of Mr. John D. Warren, Camp Hill, commanding an extensive view of the surrounding country, and associated with many stirring memories as having been the place where the troops were encamped in the last war with great Britain.--A beautiful pole, sixty feet high, had been erected, and all the preparations being completed, Miss Lucy W. Childrey, accompanied by several other young ladies, appeared upon the platform, and after a fervent and appropriate prayer by the Rev. Mr. Hatcher, proceeded to hoist the flag. Unfolding its
nfederate scout was seen on Thursday last. On that day a skirmish took place between the Confederates scouts and the Sharpsburg Home Guard; the latter were under cover of the canal, and took deliberate aim at the Confederates, and it was stated that two of their troops were killed and one wounded. The best informed sources there say that a body of 1,500 or 2,000 Confederate troops are stationed about three miles from the Ferry towards Charleston, but they were not visible either from Camp Hill pinnacle or the Londoun county mountain. Your correspondent saw a small scout near Shepherdstown. The Confederate pickets no longer show themselves at Shepherdstown, but they are known to be concealed as near as two miles back from the river, and a rumor is general that General Johnson, at the head of four regiments, has entered the neck, and is stationed seven miles from Williamsport. This report needs confirmation although it is generally believed at Williamsport. Hugh Brenna
Standing at Harper's Ferry. --A gentleman last arrived from the above locality, informed us last night that Col. Turner Ashby, of Far n erarrived at Bolivar, near Harper's ferry. about two o'clock last Sunday afternoon with 200 troops. He sent forward 10 men to reconnoitre, who reported 400 Abolition soldiers in Harper's Ferry. He proceeded intending to attack them. On arriving at Camp Hill he recertained that they had found out his design, and crossed the Potomac on a bridge of boats. After Ashby and his men got to the Ferry the enemy commenced firing on him across the river, a distance of three hundred yards, and killed the horse of a First Lieutenant. The fire was returned, one of the enemy being killed and five wounded. The Lieutenant's horse was replaced by a better one taken from the enemy. The latter have a wholesome dread of Ashby and his men, who are encamped two miles south of Charlestown, VaBanks has a considerable force two miles from Harper's Ferry. There i
From the Valley. A young gentleman who arrived in this city on Saturday evening from the lower end of the Valley furnishes us with some information from that quarter. He says that there are four regiments of Federal troops at Harper's Ferry, and that Camp Hill, west of the town, is strongly fortified. About one thousand runaway negroes are in the town, and are employed in taking down the walls of the workshops of the old armory, the Federal asserting that it is the intention of the Government to rebuild the armory. The rolling mill and tilt-hammer shops which were not destroyed when our army evacuated, are now engaged in getting out iron for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and are superintended by Rezin Cross and Alex. Kelly, former operatives of the armory. A notorious traitor, Isaac Baylis is employed by the Quartermaster at Harper's Ferry to steal horses from the citizens of the surrounding country, and it is said is faithfully discharging his duty, and realizing a rich
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1862., [Electronic resource], Camp star Martinsburg, Sept. 12th, 1862. (search)
and Anderson shelling from the Maryland side. The enemy resisted with great spirit, and their guns, of which they had a large number in position, were handled with great effect upon the column of Gen. Jackson, which had to approach them through an open space, where their guns had unobstructed play.--The shells from Walker's batteries and the impetuous attacks of Jackson's men rendered their entrenchments on Bolivar Heights too warm for the enemy, and late in the evening they fell back to Camp Hill, one miles in rear of the Bolivar fortifications. Here they had heavy guns planted and strong entrenchments thrown up, but within easy range of the batteries of McLaws and Anderson, on the opposite heights. Night coming on, the struggle ceased, Jackson's forces occupying the deserted entrenchments on the hills of Bolivar. That night old "Stonewall" sent a message to General Walker that his forces were in possession of the enemy's first line of entrenchments, and that with God's blessing
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