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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
Summary of the principal events. of some of the minor events noted in this summary no circumstantial reports are on file. All such are designated in the index. May 1, 1864.Skirmish at Stone Church. May 2, 1864.Skirmish at Lee's Cross-Roads, near Tunnel Hill. Skirmish near Ringgold Gap. May 3, 1864.Skirmish at Catoosa Springs. Skirmish at Red Clay. Skirmish at Chickamauga Creek. May 4, 1864.Maj. Gen. Frank P. Blair, jr., assumes command of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Skirmish on the Varnell's Station Road. May 5, 1864.Skirmish near Tunnel Hill. May 6-7, 1864.Skirmishes at Tunnel Hill. May 7, 1864.Skirmish at Varnell's Station. Skirmish near Nickajack Gap. May 8-11, 1864.Demonstration against Rocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
ntieth Army Corps, was directed to move from Lookout Valley, via Lee and Gordon's Mills, on East Chickamauga Creek, to Leet's farm, on the road leading from the mills to Nickajack Gap, the movement to commence on the 2d. Major-General Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Army Corps, was to concentrate his command at Ringgold, Ga., and Major-General Howard, commanding the Fourth Army Corps, was to move from Cleveland, East Tennessee, on the 3d, and concentrate his command in the vicinity of Catoosa Springs, about three miles east of Ringgold; McCook's division of cavalry to move on Howard's left; Kilpatrick's division of cavalry was stationed at Ringgold, picketing toward Tunnel Hill, and patrolling on Palmer's right flank; Garrard's division was detached and operating under instructions from Major-General McPherson, commanding the Army of the Tennessee. The army got into position by the 5th, and stood as above directed, communication having been fully established from the right to the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
The officers made extraordinary exertions to get everything in readiness, and when the order was given to march to Catoosa Springs the entire corps was prepared to move with the required number of rations, but it was soon found that the limited trand, in two columns, having pursued two distinct routes, one via Salem Church and the other via Red Clay, arrived at Catoosa Springs on the morning of the 4th of Maye Major-General Thomas having already reached Ringgold with the rest of the Army of the Cumberland, a junction was thus substantially formed with it. A very little skirmishing occurred to the east of Catoosa Springs with a detachment of General McCook's cavalry that had covered my left flank during the march from Cleveland. Not a narrow valley, and situated to the west of it. The tunnel on the Chattanooga railroad is through this hill. From Catoosa Springs my command marched on the Alabama road due east to the vicinity known as Lee's house. General Newton's division here
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 17 (search)
dical Director's office, September 18, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following brief report of such points as relate to the operations of the medical department of this corps during the recent campaign : The Fourth Army Corps participated in all the movements, skirmishes, and battles in which the Army of the Cumberland was engaged. It moved from Cleveland, Tenn., on the 3d day of May, and on the 4th of that month encountered the cavalry pickets of the rebel army near Catoosa Springs, and formed connection with the other corps of the Army of the Cumberland at that point. From that time until the 7th of the present month it was engaged in a series of skirmishes and battles, the most prominent of which are Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost, Resaca, Calhoun, Adairsville, Kingston, Dallas, Kenesaw, and Atlanta. The system of brigade hospitals was abolished at the outset of the campaign, and that of division hospitals established, as by Circular No. 4, of March 25, 1863, f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
perations May 3-July 26. Hdqrs. Firt Division, Fourth Army Corps, 1864. I have the honor to state that at 12 m. on the 3d day of May the First Division, under my command, marched from its camp at Blue Springs, under orders to move to Catoosa Springs. The division took the main road to Dalton, and encamped the same night one mile south of Red Clay. Marching early the next morning, we reached Catoosa Springs at noon, near Dr. Lee's house. General McCook's cavalry, which was in advaCatoosa Springs at noon, near Dr. Lee's house. General McCook's cavalry, which was in advance of the infantry, exchanged shots with the rebel pickets, who ran away in the direction of Tunnel Hill. We remained in camp the 5th and 6th, and on the morning of the?th marched for Tunnel Hill, this division leading. After passing Dr. Lee's house the main road leading down the base of Rocky Face was taken. Skirmishers were deployed, and the enemy's skirmishers were soon encountered. We found the road obstructed by fallen trees, but all difficulties were soon overcome, and we soon found
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
t adjutant-general. On the 3d day of May this brigade, composed of the Thirty-first Indiana, Eighty-first Indiana, Ninetieth Ohio, and One hundred and first Ohio Infantry, and detachments of the non-veterans of the Twenty-first and Thirty-eighth Illinois, attached to the One hundred and first Ohio, broke up camp at Ooltewah, Tenn., and, under command of Brigadier-General Cruft, marched out the road leading to Tunnel Hill, via Catdosa Springs; camped on a high ridge half a mile south of Catoosa Springs on the evening of the 4th. On the morning of the 7th the brigade, in advance of the division, moved directly on Tunnel Hill. The One hundred and first Ohio and two companies of the Eighty-first Indiana, deployed as skirmishers, soon met the enemy's skirmishers and drove them steadily back till our line swung around on the base of Tunnel Hill; while lying in that position General Whitaker's brigade moved down on the crest of the ridge and occupied the enemy's works on the hill. That
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
or; One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore; Fifty-first Ohio, Colonel Mc-Clain; Ninety-ninth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Cummins commanding; Eighty-fourth Indiana, Col. A. J. Neff, and Thirty-fifth Indiana. Major Dufficy commanding, and the Fifth Indiana Battery, Lieut. A. Morrison commanding, numbering 155 commissioned officers and 2,875 enlisted men, making a total of 3,028-left Blue Springs, near Cleveland, Tenn., en route for Atlanta, Ga. On the evening of the 4th we reached Catoosa Springs, where we remained until the 7th, on which day we advanced on Tunnel Hill, the First Brigade of the division having the advance; it meeting with opposition near Tunnel Hill, my brigade was detailed to act on the left next to Rocky Face. The Twenty-first Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers, supported by the brigade, formed in two lines. We drove the enemy, composed of Wheeler's cavalry, rapidly before us. The enemy formed on Tunnel Hill, but we continuing to advance, they rapidly reti
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
eutenant-Colonel Carey; Thirtieth Indiana, Captain Dawson; Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, Capt. J. J. Lawson, to which was attached Batltry B, Pennsylvania. Effective force, officers and men, about 2,900. By orders from Major-General Stanley, division commander, we marched with the balance of his command on the 3d day of May, 1864, from our camp at Blue Springs, near Cleveland, Tenn., to Red Clay, on the Georgia line, and camped for the night. May 4, marched with the division to Catoosa Springs, Ga. (with light skirmishing), for concentration with the army, where we rested until May 7, when we marched with the corps, drove the enemy from and took possession of Tunnel Hill, Ga. For several succeeding days we advanced upon and ineffectually endeavored to drive the enemy from Rocky Face Ridge in our front. My position was on the left of the rail and wagon roads leading through Buzzard Roost Gap, on the Dalton road. The enemy had strongly fortified this pass and the high ridge on e
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
report of the part taken by the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers in the recent campaign resulting in the capture of the city of Atlanta: On the morning of May 3, 1864, in obedience to the order of Col. William Grose, commanding brigade, this regiment marched from Blue Springs, Tenn., in the direction of Red Clay, Ga., at which place the command went into camp for the night. At 6 a. m. the next day moved toward Dalton, and in the afternoon formed line of battle and bivouacked near Catoosa Springs. Again, on the morning of the 7th, moved to Tunnel Hill, formed line of battle, and advanced upon the enemy, who were behind works, but they soon evacuated them, leaving our troops in possession of the town and works. At an early hour the next morning, May 8, this regiment advanced in front line down the valley, driving in the rebel skirmishers till within range of the enemy, who was strongly intrenched on Rocky Face Ridge. This regiment was only engaged occasionally at skirmishing t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
Hdqrs. 77TH Regt. Pennsylvania Vet. Vol. Infty., In Camp, near Atlanta, Ga., September 14, 1864. Captain : The following is the report of the operations of my regiment during the campaign commencing on the 5th of May, 1864, and ending on the 8th of September, 1864: On the 3d of May, 1864, the regiment broke camp at Blue Springs, at 12 m., and moved out six miles to the Knoxville and Dalton Railroad, and encamped for the night. On Wednesday, May 4, we marched at 5 a. m. to Catoosa Springs, where we encamped for two days. On Saturday, May 7, marched south to Tunnel Hill. On Sunday, May 8, moved to Mill Creek Gap and Rocky Face Ridge. On Monday, May 9, near midnight, the regiment went on picket. On Tuesday, May 10, skirmished all day with the enemy; had 3 enlisted men wounded. On Wednesday, May 11, the regiment, with the Thirtieth Indiana, moved on to a ridge which commanded Mill Creek Gap, and threw up rifle-pits. On Friday, May 13, at 5 a. m. the regiment with the d
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