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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 76 (search)
. Col. Chesley D. Bailey, Ninth Kentucky Infantry, of operations May 3-June 26. Atlanta, Ga., September 13, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following as my official report of the part taken by the Ninth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers in the recent campaign during the time I was in command, viz, from the beginning of the campaign until the 26th day of June, 1864, at which time I was succeeded by Colonel Cram: Left McDonald's Station on the 3d of May and reached Catoosa Springs, Ga., on the evening of the 4th, where we lay until the morning of the 7th, when we moved out on the Tunnel Hill road. The advance was attended with some skirmishing and occasional artillery firing. Reached Tunnel Hill at 2 p. m., from the top of which the enemy could be plainly seen occupying Rocky Face Ridge, little more than a mile distant. Lay on the hill until the next morning, the 8th, when we advanced toward the ridge, making a demonstration to detract the attention of the enemy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 78 (search)
ta, Ga., September 14, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the marches and operations of this regiment from the 3d day of May, 1864, when this brigade left McDonald's Station, near Cleveland, Tenn., to the 8th day of the current month, when the same went into camp at this place: It is deemed unnecessary to describe every movement made by this regiment, as it was generally with the brigade. By easy marches the distance between McDonald's Station and Catoosa Springs was made by the evening of the 4th of May. There we rested on the 5th and 6th, and on the morning of the 7th moved in the direction of Tunnel Hill, the enemy having given ground before other troops in advance of us, and passed over Tunnel Hill and took position before Rocky Face Ridge. There the brigade encamped, and this regiment was sent to the front upon outpost duty, and on the 8th advanced up the side of Rocky Face as skirmishers, and were supported by the Thirteenth Ohio Regimen
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 81 (search)
rt of Capt. Robert H. Higgins, Fifty-ninth Ohio Infantry. Hdqrs. Fifty-Ninth regiment Ohio Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864. Captain: In compliance with an order from Colonel Knefler, commanding brigade, the following report of the operations of this regiment since leaving camp at McDonald's Station, is respectfully submitted: On the 3d day of May last the regiment marched from the camp above mentioned, and about noon of the 5th of the same month arrived at Catoosa Springs, in Georgia. On the 7th the regiment moved to Rocky Face Ridge, which was then occupied by the enemy, who, just beyond this point, was intrenched at Buzzard Roost; here we remained, engaged in occasional skirmishes, in which we lost 1 man killed, 7 wounded, and 1 missing, until the morning of the 13th, when we marched in pursuit of the enemy, who had evacuated his position, and whom we next encountered before Resaca, where we arrived on the evening of the 14th. In the fighting at this place
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
Sixth Ohio Light Battery, chief of artillery. On May 3 the batteries moved with their respective divisions, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, marched via Red Clay to Catoosa Springs. Bridges' Battery and Sixth Ohio Light Battery marched via Ooltewah to Catoosa Springs. Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, joined the Second Division for duty May 6. On May 7 the batteries marched with their respective divisions to TunCatoosa Springs. Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, joined the Second Division for duty May 6. On May 7 the batteries marched with their respective divisions to Tunnel Hill, the Fifth Indiana being the only battery engaged on that day. May 8, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries shelled the enemy upon Rocky Face Ridge. May 9, the Fifth Indiana, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, and Bridges' Battery were placed in position on a small ridge between Tunnel Hill and Rocky Face Ridge, and engaged the enemy's batteries and lines, silencing his batteries. On the same day Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, placed a section on the top of Roc
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 83 (search)
No. 79. report of Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery, Chief of artillery, First Division, of operations May 3-June 9. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourth Army Corps, In the Field, near , Ga., June 9, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the batteries of my command from May 3 up to the present date: The batteries marched with the division by Red Clay, Catoosa Springs, to Tunnel Hill, upon which the enemy appeared to be posted in considerable force. To drive the enemy from this position a strong demonstration by our troops was made, and with whom I sent four guns of the Fifth Indiana Battery, while the real attack was made by securing a lodgment for a brigade and two guns from the same battery. This section advanced down the ridge with the brigade, and assisted in the movement by firing about fifteen rounds of ammunition. On the following day (the 8th ultimo) the Fifth Indiana Battery was engaged in shelling a line of r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 87 (search)
No. 83. report of Capt. Wilbur F. Goodspeed, Battery a, First Ohio Light artillery. Hdqrs. Battery A, First Ohio Light artillery, In the Field, Ga., September 7, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to report as follows the operations of my battery from May 7, 1864, up to this date: I joined the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, on the evening of May 6 at Catoosa Springs, Ga., and marched with it the morning following toward Tunnel Hill. I took several positions during the day as the division advanced, but did no firing, no position being found for my battery. I lay in reserve near Rocky Face Ridge until the morning of the 12th, when I moved with the division and took a position in the gap to the left of Rocky Face, where I remained during that day and the night following. May 13, I marched with the division through Dalton. May 14, I took position in reserve in rear of General Newton's lines near Resaca, Ga., but did not become engaged. At daylight on the morning of th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 144 (search)
ond Indiana Veteran Volunteers, Eighty-fifth, Eighty-sixth, and One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois Volunteers, and the Fiftysecond Ohio Volunteers, commanded by Col. Daniel McCook, left Lee and Gordon's Mills on the same day it broke up camp and marched to Ringgold, Ga., where, toward night, it crossed the Chickamauga River and joined the division, then commanded by Brig. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, and bivouacked until the morning of the 5th of May, when the brigade marched out to near Catoosa Springs and again bivouacked until the morning of the 7th, when it marched beyond Tunnel Hill about two miles, part of the time under heavy fire from the enemy's batteries. On the morning of the 8th of May the brigade marched toward and confronted the enemy's skirmishers guarding the entrance to Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, supported the First Brigade skirmish line. May 10, the brigade lay under the fire from the enemy's sharpshooters, In the evening of this day it moved to the front and relieve
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
he Third Division and to march with it to Catoosa Springs, where it would join General Stanley's cowith General Wood's column on the road to Catoosa Springs via Salem Church. Arrived at this point m., moving from Red Clay down the road to Catoosa Springs via Ellidge's Mill, Colonel McCook's brigutheast and is along a ridge which covers Catoosa Springs, the left is about one-half mile in a direm Church was reached; from that point to Catoosa Springs it is bad, and without being worked wouldr heavy rains. Opened communication from Catoosa Springs to Ringgold by signal. An aide-de-camp, ry warm. Ml2ay 6.-Remained in camp at Catoosa Springs. Major-General Howard started over to Rin will leave Salem Church at 5 a. m., pass Catoosa Springs, and camp at some point on the Alabama roght the rebels were going to Ringgold via Catoosa Springs or Alabama road, and that he would try to Losses up to date, from time of leaving Catoosa Springs, killed, 189; wounded, 1,078. May 17[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
ill of preparation, a new life everywhere. Soldiers and civilians alike caught the inspiration. Ringgold and Catoosa Springs, Georgia, were the points of concentration for Thomas's three corps. We of his army were all in that neighborhood by theeast vertex, was the center of the Confederate army, under Joseph E. Johnston. Pushing out from Dalton toward us at Catoosa Springs, Johnston occupied the famous pass through Taylor's Ridge, Buzzard-Roost Gap, and part of the ridge itself; and heldn of author and Publishers. When the Army of the Cumberland was in line, facing the enemy, its left rested near Catoosa Springs, its center at Ringgold, the railway station, and its right at Leet's Tan-yard. My corps formed the left. Catoosa Catoosa Springs was a Georgia watering-place, where there were several large buildings, hotel and boarding-houses, amid undulating hills, backed by magnificent mountain scenery. Here, on the morning of the 6th, I met Thomas and Sherman. Sherman had a habi
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
removed my headquarters to Chattanooga, and prepared for taking the field in person. General Grant had first indicated the 30th of April as the day for the simultaneous advance, but subsequently changed the day to May 5th. McPherson's troops were brought forward rapidly to Chattanooga, partly by rail and partly by marching. Thomas's troops were already in position (his advance being out as far as Ringgold--eighteen miles), and Schofield was marching down by Cleveland to Red Clay and Catoosa Springs. On the 4th of May, Thomas was in person at Ringgold, his left at Catoosa, and his right at Leet's Tan-yard. Schofield was at Red Clay, closing upon Thomas's left; and McPherson was moving rapidly into Chattanooga, and out toward Gordon's Mill. On the 5th I rode out to Ringgold, and on the very day appointed by General Grant from his headquarters in Virginia the great campaign was begun. To give all the minute details will involve more than is contemplated, and I will endeavor onl
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