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lliam T. Street, of U. S. cutter Dana, volunteered the services of himself and vessel. The, Island Belle, with the Dana in tow, ran up Port Tobacco Creek to Chapel Point, and on them I embarked about four hundred picked men of my regiment. The embarkation was conducted silently and in good order. Arrived at Matthias Point, I , four hundred men were detailed from the various companies of the regiment, and provided with forty rounds of ball cartridge. They marched some four miles to Chapel Point, where the gunboats were lying. Here they embarked in good order and fine spirits. The moon was hidden by the clouds, and a fresh breeze was blowing. The Isguns of the Dana and Island Belle shotted and manned. But after waiting an hour, no enemy appeared, and the men were all safely reembarked and again landed on Chapel Point, without the slightest injury to a single person of the force. They were followed by a large frigate's launch, filled with contrabands. These poor darkies we
on. Arrived at Port Tobacco the evening of the second, where we encamped for the night. Discovered nothing at this place of a suspicious character. The morning of the third visited Captain Kenyon, commanding squadron of Scott's Legion, at Chapel Point, about four miles below Port Tobacco. His whole force is stationed at this point, and he sends out parties into the surrounding country only upon receiving information that something of a treasonable nature is going on. He had lately made sevbout four miles below Fort Washington to the mouth of the Potomac. The blockade cannot be effectual, for thousands of dollars worth of goods are monthly smuggled into Virginia. I would respectfully suggest-- 1. That the force stationed at Chapel Point, on the Potomac, numbering sixty men, be increased to several hundred, as the number now there is wholly inadequate to the amount of labor to be performed. 2. That this force be so disposed as to patrol the country and river shore daily, fr
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], Summary disposal of a Partnership interest. (search)
Rumor Contradicted. --The Port Tobacco (Md.) Times says that the report as to the landing of Federal troops at Chapel Point, to be stationed at that place, is unfounded. A party of men from a Government steamer had staked out in Port Tobacco creek, as far as Chapel Point. The report of the arrival of arms and ammunition is also incorrect. It adds that the fine prospects of the wheat crop in this county are greatly lessened by the appearance and ravages of fly and joint-worm. Rumor Contradicted. --The Port Tobacco (Md.) Times says that the report as to the landing of Federal troops at Chapel Point, to be stationed at that place, is unfounded. A party of men from a Government steamer had staked out in Port Tobacco creek, as far as Chapel Point. The report of the arrival of arms and ammunition is also incorrect. It adds that the fine prospects of the wheat crop in this county are greatly lessened by the appearance and ravages of fly and joint-worm.
Gen. Cadwallader's, who crossed the Potomac at and near Williams port during last Saturday and Monday, into Virginia, had retired by recrossing the river into Maryland, under the belief that Gen. Johnston was moving forward in large forces to attack them. This information is said to be reliable. Movements down the Potomac. The steamer Mount Vernon, which, left Washington Navy-Yard on Monday night, having on board two companies of the New York Seventy-first Regiment, went down to Chapel Point, five miles from Port Tabacco, where the two companies disembarked, and marched to Port Tobacco in quest of Secession troops supposed to be there. It seems that Port Tobacco has been a headquarters for Maryland Secession recruits, and when ten to twenty would arrive there and enlist they were boated across the river to Virginia. The military, on arriving at Port Tobacco, found only one soldier in the place, and he bore a Captain's commission from Gov. Hicks, of Maryland. While the beli