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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coronado, Francisco Vasquez de 1510-1542 (search)
people which were sent in the name of the emperours maiestie to the countrey of Cibola newly discouered, which he sent to Don Antonio de Mendoca viceroy of Mexico, ofp. 3. of the situation and state of the seuen cities called the kingdome of Cibola, and of the customes and qualities of those people, and of the beasts which aretand all within foure leagues together, and they are all called the kingdome of Cibola, and euery one of them haue their particular name: and none of them is called CCibola, but altogether they are called Cibola. And this towne which I call a citie, I haue named Granada, as well because it is somewhat like vnto it, as also in remCibola. And this towne which I call a citie, I haue named Granada, as well because it is somewhat like vnto it, as also in remembrance of your lordship. In this towne where I nowe remaine, there may be some two hundred houses, all compassed with walles, and I thinke that with the rest of thfe. Our Lorde God keepe and preserue your Excellencie. From the Prouince of Cibola, and from this citie of Granada the third of August 1540. Francis Vasques de C
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cushing, Frank Hamilton 1857- (search)
e ethnological exhibit of the National Museum at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; in 1879 was assistant ethnologist with Major J. W. Powell in the expedition to New Mexico; and at his own request was left with the Zuni Indians, where he lived for three years, and later for three additional years; acquired their language and traditions; was initiated into their priesthood; and was thus the first white man to learn the true character of Indian secret societies. In 1881 he discovered the ruins of the Seven Cities of Cibola, and conducted excavations among them and the great buried cities in southern Arizona. In 1895 he discovered the extensive remains of a sea-dwelling people along the Gulf coast of Florida, and in 1896 led there the Pepper-Hearst expedition. Was author of The myths of creation; Preliminary report of Pepper-Hearst expedition on the ancient Key dwellers of Florida; The arrow; and many official reports and papers. He died in Washington, D. C., April 10, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nica, Marco de (search)
s one of the four men of Narvaez's expedition into Florida who made a perilous journey across the continent. Nina returned to Coronado and announced that he had discovered from a mountaintop seven cities, and that he visited one which was called Cibola. It was garnished with gold and pearls. There, he alleged, his negro companion, whom he had sent before, was murdered by the jealous inhabitants. Coronado, in further explorations, found well-built houses in groups —pueblos— three or four loftre, he alleged, his negro companion, whom he had sent before, was murdered by the jealous inhabitants. Coronado, in further explorations, found well-built houses in groups —pueblos— three or four lofts high, with good lodgings and fair chambers, and ladders instead of stairs. He said the seven cities were within four leagues of each other, and formed the kingdom of Cibola; but he did not find gold and turquoises. Remains of these pueblos are found in the region traversed by Nica and C
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Simpson, James Hervey 1813-1883 (search)
Simpson, James Hervey 1813-1883 Military officer; born in New Jersey, March 9, 1813; graduated at West Point in 1832, entering the artillery corps. He was aide to General Eustis in the Seminole War, and in 1838 became a lieutenant in the corps of topographical engineers. He was colonel of the 4th New Jersey Volunteers in the Pensacola campaign, and was afterwards chief engineer of the Department of Ohio. In March, 1865, he was brevetted brigadiergeneral, United States army. Having been on surveying expeditions in the West, he published a Journal of a military reconnoissance from Santa Fe to the Navajo country; A report on the Union Pacific Railroad and its branches; and Essay on Coronado's March in search of the seven cities of Cibola. He died in St. Paul, Minn., March 2, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Zuñi Indians, (search)
stern part of New Mexico; discovered by Fray Marcos de Niza in 1539; and shown by the late Frank Hamilton Cushing (q. v.) to be the most interesting body of Indians now on the American continent. They were named by their discoverer the people of Cibola, A Zuñi Indian. and they originally had seven pueblos, the seven cities of Cibola. As far back as 1540, when the advance of Coronado's army reached that region, these towns were in ruins and deserted. It was K'iakime, the most easterly of tCibola. As far back as 1540, when the advance of Coronado's army reached that region, these towns were in ruins and deserted. It was K'iakime, the most easterly of these seven cities, that Fray Marcos discovered in 1539. He was killed by its inhabitants, but the monk who accompanied him escaped, and from his pen came the first account of the Zuñis, a narrative that was enlarged and embellished by subsequent travellers. Frank H. Cushing spent several years among them, was adopted by them, and gave to the world the most accurate account of their history and manners and customs that it ever possessed. The other cities were Hawikuh, subdued by Coronado in 1
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
nds practically with the beginning of white settlements, and there is no reason to believe that the epic as a whole is anything other than a fairly accurate traditional account of actual tribal movements. The Zuñi creation epic, though never committed to writing, is several literary stages in advance of the Walam Olum. The Zuñi are a sedentary people living in the high valleys of what is now New Mexico. When Coronado discovered them in 1540 they were distributed among the Seven Cities of Cibola, subsisting on agriculture and an extensive trade with adjacent tribes in blankets, salt, cotton, and silver and turquoise jewelry. Like the Walam Olum their Creation Myth purports to give a history of the tribe from the creation of the world to its settlement in its present location. The manner in which it is preserved in entirety is exceedingly interesting. It is serial in composition, and the various parts are each committed to one of the priestly orders called the Midmost, whose offic
entertained as public guests. In 1530 an Indian slave had told wonders of the seven cities of Cibola, the Land of Buffaloes, that lay at the north between the oceans and beyond the desert, and abouenth of March, 1539, he de- 1539. spatched them under special instructions from Mendoza to find Cibola. The negro, having rapidly hurried on before the party, provoked the natives by insolent demandf the following September, Niza was again at Mexico, where he boasted that he had been as far as Cibola, though he had not dared to enter within its walls; that, with its terraced stone houses of manyhe eleventh of May, Old Style, about forty-six days after Easter, 1540, they reached the town of Cibola, which the natives called Zuñi. A single glance at the little village, built upon a rocky table,life, stole back to New Spain with the first messenger to the viceroy. As the other cities of Cibola were scarcely more considerable than Zuñi, Coronado despatched Pedro de Tobar with a party of ho