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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Clarkson, Mo. (Missouri, United States) or search for Clarkson, Mo. (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
ance of the paper as conducted by them. In a department of the Genius which he styled the Black List, and which bore at its head the figure of a chained and kneeling negro, This figure, originally designed for the seal of the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, in October, 1787, had a powerful influence in kindling anti-slavery sentiment in Great Britain, and was, with its direct and pathetic appeal, no less an inspiration and incentive to the American abolitionists. (See Clarkson's History of the slave trade, Chapter XX:) with the motto, Am I not a Man and a Brother? Mr. Garrison recorded each week some of the terrible incidents of slavery,—instances of cruelty and torture, cases of kidnapping, advertisements of slave auctions, and descriptions of the horrors of the foreign and domestic slave trade. By common consent of the principal maritime nations, the foreign slave trade was now adjudged felony, and their navies united in efforts for its suppression. When the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
ountry and their unexpected allies. The subsequent formation of a society in the United States for immediate emancipation was still more cheering: I did indeed feel it as a cordial to my heart, wrote James Lib. 3.7. Cropper to Arnold Buffum in August, 1832. Meantime Elliott Cresson's activity among the wealthy and philanthropic denomination of which Cropper was so admirable a representative, was practically unchecked, though his unscrupulousness had been discovered. He lost no time Clarkson's Strictures on Life of Wilberforce, and Wilberforce's letter to Clarkson, Oct. 10, 1831. after his arrival out In the summer of 1831. (See African Repository for November; also, Harriet Martineau's Autobiography, 1.149.) in visiting Wilberforce, whom he failed to convince of the practicability of transporting the blacks to Liberia; and the blind Clarkson, whom he deceived by the most outrageous fictions in regard to the emancipatory intentions and influence of the Society, and committe
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
per to state in what manner the mind of this venerable philanthropist became so strongly impressed in favor of the Colonization Society and of Liberia. It happens that the individual who, of all others in England, exerts the most influence over Clarkson's mind, is the main pillar of Mr. Cresson's support—namely, Richard Dykes Alexander, a wealthy and respectable member of the Society of Friends. As Clarkson has entirely lost his sight, this gentleman reads and answers many of his letters, and ease of life before him, surviving till 1846. we found to be very beautiful. On alighting at his door, Mr. Paul and myself, at the request of Mr. Alexander, strolled about the serpentine paths of the Park, while he went in to ascertain whether Clarkson's health would permit an interview at that time—as, a few days before, he had injured one of his legs severely against the shaft of his carriage. In about twenty minutes we were called into the house, and were met by Clarkson totteringly suppor