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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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sas, and declared the crime of jayhawking should be put down with a strong hand and summary process. Commander Rowan, with fourteen vessels, left Roanoke Island yesterday afternoon, and at six minutes past nine, this morning, when off Cobb's Point, N. C., he attacked the rebels' squadron, which had fled from Roanoke, under Commander Lynch, and two batteries, mounting five guns. Within twenty minutes a schooner belonging to the enemy, struck her colors, and was burned by her crew; and immeolors, and was burned by her crew; and immediately afterward, the crews of the Powhatan, Fanny, Sea Bird and Forrest, ran them ashore and set fire to them, while those of the Raleigh and Beaufort ran their vessels into the Canal and escaped; the Ellis was captured, and brought away by the Union forces. The battery on Cobb's Point was also abandoned by the enemy, and occupied by acting Master's Mate Raymond during the morning; and before ten o'clock Elizabeth City also surrendered.--(Doc. 33.)
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
protracted combat, and to bring the enemy to close quarters as soon as possible, for the reason that his ammunition was reduced to 20 rounds for each gun in the fleet (owing to the battle of Roanoke Island). He made signal for the commanders of vessels to come on board the flagship, and after conferring with them in regard to the proper measures to be adopted he gave them their final orders. It was naturally expected that the Confederate fleet would take position behind the battery at Cobb's Point, and there await the attack; but the result was not feared, as it had been shown in the battle of Roanoke Island that the Confederate vessels could not hold their own, even when supported by heavy forts. The plan of attack was that the gun-boats should approach in close order and proceed up the river without firing a shot until ordered to do so, dash through the enemy's lines, crushing and sinking him if possible, or engage in hand-to-hand conflict; after capturing or destroying the st
ell. At twenty-five minutes past nine A. M. the schooner struck her colors, and was found to be on fire. About the same time the rebel flag on the battery at Cobb's Point was taken down and waved apparently as a signal for the rebel gunboats. Wm. F. Lynch, Flag-Officer, was commanding at the fort. This signal was afterwards asf the coolness, gallantry and skill, displayed by the officers and men under his command, in the capture and destruction of the enemy's battery and squadron at Cobb's Point. The strict observance of the plan of attack, and the steady but onward course of the ships, without returning a shot until within three quarters of a mile t nine o'clock, and after a very sharp engagement have succeeded in destroying or capturing his entire naval force, and silencing and destroying his battery on Cobb's Point. The only vessel saved from destruction is the Ellis, Capt. J. M. Cook, who is wounded and a prisoner on board this ship. I have other prisoners. I am h
Doc. 147.-obstruction of Dismal swamp canal. Lieut. Com. Flusser's report. on the eighteenth of April, the forces under Gen. Reno debarked at Cobbs' Point, N. C., for the purpose of destroying the locks of the Dismal Swamp Canal. Having retired without accomplishing the object, Com. Rowan determined to destroy the canal with the naval forces under his command. The following is the report of the successful accomplishment of the work: U. S. Steamer Commodore Perry, off Elizabeth City, N. C., April 26. sir: In obedience to your orders I left this place on the twenty-third inst., in the Lockwood, with the Whitehead and Putnam, in company, each with an officer and a detachment of men on board, the Lockwood towing the wrecking schooner Emma Slade, with the apparatus for blowing up the banks to block up the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal at the mouth of the North River. We were joined by the Shawsheen, having in tow a schooner which had been sent the day before to Roanoke
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
ey, Hunchback, Ceres, Putnam, Morse, Lockwood, Seymour, Granite, Brinker, Whitehead, Shawseen, Pickett, Pioneer, Hussar, Vidette, Chasseur. Confed., 2d, 7th, 8th, 17th, 19th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 31st, 33d, 35th, 37th, 46th, 59th N. C., Brem's, Latham's, Whitehurst's N. C. Art., Gunboats Seabird, Curlew, Ellis, Beaufort, Raleigh, Fanny, Forrest. Losses: Union 35 killed, 200 wounded. Confed. 16 killed, 39 wounded, 2,527 taken prisoners. February 10, 1862: Elizabeth City, or Cobb's Point, N. C. Union, Gunboats Delaware, Underwriter, Louisiana, Seymour, Hetzel, Shawseen, Valley City, Putnam, Commodore Perry, Ceres, Morse, Whitehead, and Brinker. Confed., Mosquito fleet commanded by Commodore W. F. Lynch, and comprising the vessels engaged at Roanoke Island on the 8th, except the Curlew. Losses: Union 3 killed. February 13, 1862: Bloomery Gap, Va. Union, Gen. Lander's Brigade. Confed., 31st, 67th, 89th Va. Losses: Union 11 killed, 5 wounded. Confe
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
nt, N. Y. February, 1862. February 6, 1862. Unconditional surrender of Fort Henry to Flag-Officer Foote. February 7-10, 1862. Lieut. Phelps, of Foote's flotilla, commanding the gunboats Conestoga, Tyler and Lexington, captured Confed. gunboat Eastport and destroyed all the Confed. craft on the Tennessee River between Fort Henry and Florence, Ala. February 10, 1862. Destruction of Confed. gunboats in the Pasquotank River, N. C., also of the Confed. battery at Cobb's Point, and the occupation of Elizabeth City by Federal forces from 14 gunboats, commanded by Commander Rowan. February 14, 1862. Foote, with 6 gunboats, attacked Fort Donelson, but was repulsed, the flag-officer being severely wounded. Federal loss 60 in killed and wounded. February 28, 1862. Confed. steamer Nashville ran the blockade of Beaufort, N. C., and reached the town. March, 1862. March 1, 1862. U. S. gunboats Tyler, Lieut. Gwin, commanding, and Lexington, Li
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
d on the 7th, a gunboat on the stocks, and another vessel with lighter frame had been set on fire at the shipyard by the enemy. Competent persons were sent on shore to destroy boilers and machinery and ways; this done, the vessels withdrew to Cobb's Point. Unsuccessful efforts had been made by other vessels of the flotilla to extinguish the fires on board of the Fanny and the Black Warrior. The latter vessel had on board a large amount of provisions and stores for the Confederate vessels, all of which were burned. The machinery of the Fanny and Sea Bird was destroyed and the armament of those vessels was in part recovered. The fort at Cobb's Point was destroyed, after removing powder, powder tanks, and projectiles, and some of the vessels were then despatched to further thwart the designs of the enemy. Nothing more brilliant in naval dash occurred during the entire civil war than appears in this attack. Lieutenant-Commanding Murray in the Louisiana, accompanied by the Underwri
Cloth for uniforms, scarcity of, in the South, VIII., 142. Clothing: for the armies, VIII., 54, 56; supply depots, Confederate, VIII., 56; supply depots U. S. army, VIII., 56. Cloutersville, La., II., 352. Cloyds Mountain, Va., III., 320. Clustee, Fla, II., 349. Clymer, G., VI., 127. Cobb, H.: II., 92, 94, 96; III., 230; VII., 100, 122; X., 263. Cobb, T. R. R.: II., 81, 326, 328; X., 151. Cobb's Hill Tower, Petersburg, Va. , VIII., 310. Cobb's Point, N. C.: I., 356; Confederate battery at, VI., 312. Cobham, G. A., Jr. II., 302. Cocke, P. St. G., V., 64; X., 319. Cochrane, J., X., 223. Cockrell, F. M., II., 320; III., 340. Cockrell, J. H., X., 279. Cockrell's cavalry, Confederate. II., 320. Cockrill, M. S., V., 65. Code signals Viii., 316. Coe, C., IX., 351. Coehorn mortars V., 50, 54. Coeur de Lion,, U. S. S., VIII., 374. Coffeeville, Miss., II., 326. Coggi
ing that he had only seven men on which he could rely to man the batteries, he took the officer and crew of the Beaufort on shore and manned two of the guns at Cobb's Point. The orders of the Commodore were peremptory to the commandants of the vessels when the means of resistance failed to ran each one into shoal water, set her on fire and save the crew. From some unexplained cause this was only obeyed by the Commandant of the Fanny. The fight continued at Cobb's Point one hour and fifteen minutes, when the gunboats succeeded in passing the battery and crossed upon and captured the Seabird and the Ellis. The Fanny was set on fire and burned, and thof the enemy. The Appomattox, Beaufort, and Raleigh had the best machinery, and are probably saved. The others were of little value. Com. Lynch left Cobb's Point with fifty-two officers and men, who have escaped.--But six of his men were killed and three wounded. B. Ham and J. W. Ham, privates in Capt. Jones's comp