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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 101 results in 48 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
ld gentlemen, over 82 years of age, a cripple,. and can neither read nor write the English language, though a good German scholar. This gentlemen was one of twelve children, had served in the war of 1812, was the son of a Revolutionary soldier who bore his musket during the whole war, inherited a woodland tract, and built up a substantial home in the midst of Western Virginia. His was only one of a class which swept over West Virginia, and left the beautiful valleys of Tygart and the Potomac rivers in ashes and desolation. It is to pay for crimes like these, and keep in employment the men who committed them, that created the debt now weighing the people down. It was to pay such monsters, with their tools, that money was refunded by the General Government to the State of Missouri and West Virginia, and the taxes saddled upon the people of the country. The following letter gives its own explanation: Macon, Georgia, October 7, 1867. Henry Clay Dean, Mount Pleasant, Iowa
hird Corps used to sing in the fall of 1863, to the tune of When Johnny comes marching home, which is an amusing jingle of historical facts. I have not heard it sung since that time, but it ran substantially as follows:-- We are the boys of Potomac's ranks, Hurrah! Hurrah! We are the boys of Potomac's ranks, We ran with McDowell, retreated with Banks, And we'll all drink stone blind-- Johnny, fill up the bowl. We fought with McClellan, the Rebs, shakes and fever, Hurrah! Hurrah! Then wePotomac's ranks, We ran with McDowell, retreated with Banks, And we'll all drink stone blind-- Johnny, fill up the bowl. We fought with McClellan, the Rebs, shakes and fever, Hurrah! Hurrah! Then we fought with McClellan, the Rebs, shakes and fever, But Mac joined the navy on reaching James River, And we'll all drink, etc. Then they gave us John Pope, our patience to tax, Hurrah! Hurrah! Then they gave us John Pope our patience to tax, Who said that out West he'd seen naught but Gray backs. An allusion to a statement in the address made by Pope, on taking command of the Army of Virginia, I have come to you from the West where we have always seen the backs of our enemies. He said his
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
at Charlestown, Virginia,--John Brown on the 2d of December, 1859; John E. Cook, Edwin Coppoc, John A. Copeland (a mulatto), and Shields Green (a negro) on the 16th of December; and Aaron D. Stevens and Albert Hazlett on the 16th of the following March. Three citizens and a number of negroes were killed by the insurgents, and others were wounded. Editors. A little before dawn of the next day, April 18th, a brilliant light arose from near the point of confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers. General Harper, who up to that moment had expected a conflict with the Massachusetts regiment supposed to be at Harper's Ferry, was making his dispositions for an attack at daybreak, when this light convinced him that the enemy had fired the arsenal and fled. He marched in and took possession, but too late to extinguish the flames. Nearly twenty thousand rifles and pistols were destroyed. The workshops had not been fired. The people of the town told us the catastrophe, for such it w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.58 (search)
mmand could not have been driven out. No batteries could have been put up by the Confederates in the face of the broadsides of their ships, and it being only twelve miles from Fort Monroe (Old Point Comfort) it could have been reinforced to any extent. But they did give it up, and had hardly done so when they commenced making preparations to retake it. The navy yard contained a large number of heavy cannon, and these guns were used not only to fortify Norfolk and the batteries on the York, Potomac, James, and Rappahannock rivers, but were sent to North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. They were to be found at Roanoke Island, Wilmington, Charleston, Mobile, New Orleans, Vicksburg, and many other places. These guns, according to J. T. Scharf, numbered 1198, of which 52 were nine-inch Dahlgrens. editors. About 1 P. M. on the 8th of March, a courier dashed up to my headquarters with this brief dispatch: The Virginia is coming up the river.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 35: battles of Cold Harbor. (search)
oss that river, after the loss of New Orleans and Memphis, always difficult. The Ohio River, in the West, and the Potomac, in the East, with the mountains of Western Virginia, rendered it impossible for an invading army to march into the enemy's country, except at one or two fords of the Potomac, just east of the Blue Ridge, and two or three fords above Harper's Ferry. The possession of the seas, and the blockade of our ports, as well as the possession of the Mississippi, the Ohio, and Potomac Rivers, with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and the railroads through Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, enabled the enemy to transport troops, from the most remote points, with more ease and rapidity than they could be transported over the railroads under the control of the Confederate Government, all of which were in bad condition. The enemy, therefore, in fact, had all the advantages of interior lines; that is, rapidity of communication and concentration, with
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
Chapter 1: ancestry. Westmoreland is one of a group of counties in Virginia lying between the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers. It was originally a portion of Northumberland County, and, though small in geographical extent, its historical record is great. Within a space of thirty miles in length and an average width of fifteen miles were born statesmen, soldiers, and patriots whose lives and characters adorn the pages of American history, and whose courage, genius, and learning are the proud inheritance of those who dwell to-day in the powerful republic of America. Here, from England, in 1665, settled the great-grandfather of the Father of his country. Americanized, he became an extensive planter, soldier, magistrate, member of the House of Burgesses, and a gentleman whose virtue and piety were undoubted. In his will he expressed his sorrow for his sins, and begged forgiveness from Almighty God, Saviour, and Redeemer. Here his son, Lawrence, and his grandson, Augustine, were
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
Ohio Railway, the canal, and the Fredericktown turnpike reach out to the west, and at the pass is the little town of Riverton. Between Riverton and Harper's Ferry was the hamlet Sandy Hook, occupied by about fifteen hundred Federal troops. Two roads wind through Pleasant Valley, one close under South Mountain, the other hugging the foot-hills of Elk Ridge,--the latter rugged, little used. Harper's Ferry, against which Lee's new movement was directed, nestles at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, on the Virginia side, under the towering cliffs of Maryland or Cumberland Heights. At Harper's Ferry the river cuts in so close under Maryland Heights that they stand almost perpendicularly over it. The crowded space between the heights and the river, filled by the railway, canal, and turnpike, was made by blastings from the southern extremities of Maryland Heights. Under the precipice the railroad bridge crosses the Potomac, and a pontoon bridge was laid a few yard
ortance of the occasion and the historical reminiscences of the city.--Baltimore American, October 19. Col. John W. Geary, of the Pennsylvania Twenty-eighth regiment, with detachments from his own, the Thirteenth Mass., and Third Wisconsin regiments, in all four hundred men, crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, and captured twenty-one thousand bushels of wheat stored in a mill near that place. While upon his return and on the Charleston road, near Bolivar Heights, midway between the Potomac and the Shenandoah rivers, he was attacked by a large Confederate force with infantry, artillery, and cavalry. Rebel batteries upon London and Bolivar Heights participated in the action, as did also a National battery upon the Maryland side. After several hours of intermittent fighting, the rebels were driven off, supposed with considerable loss. National loss four killed and eight wounded. Col. Geary took from the rebels one thirty-two pounder.--(Doc. 90.) Indiana disputes the stat
vity could devise to furnish this division with every thing required to render it efficient in the field. This order will be published to the command as an assurance of our appreciation of his ability, and a copy of the same will be furnished Capt. Ambrose Thompson. The United States revenue steamer Reliance arrived at Baltimore, Md., this morning, with four prize vessels — the schooners Hartford, Bride, Whig and Two Brothers — all captured in Wicomico River, between the mouths of the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers, Va. They had all been landing coffee, salt, flour, flannel and whiskey for the rebels.--New York Herald, April 13. Near Monterey, Va., the rebels about one thousand strong, with cavalry companies and two pieces of artillery, attacked the National pickets this morning about ten o'clock, and drove them some two miles. Gen. Milroy sent out reenforcements consisting of two companies of the Seventy-fifth Ohio, two companies of the Second Virginia, two companies of t
May 28. The Eighth Illinois cavalry, under the command of Col. D. R. Clendenin, returned to the headquarters of the army of the Potomac, after a raid along the banks of the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers below Fredericksburgh, Va. The regiment were on the scout for eleven days, during which time they captured five hundred horses and mules, destroyed twenty thousand pounds of bacon, and a large quantity of flour; burned one hundred sloops, yawls, ferry-boats, etc., laden with contraband goods, intended for the use of the rebels, and valued at one million dollars; and brought into camp eight hundred and ten negro men, women, and children, with a great deal of personal property, consisting of horses, mules, carts, clothing, etc., and also one hundred rebel prisoners, several of whom were officers of the rebel army. There was much excitement in Boston, on the occasion of the departure of the Fifty-fourth regiment, colored Massachusetts troops, for South-Carolina. This was the
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