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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Cornfield Point (Maryland, United States) or search for Cornfield Point (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algonquian, or Algonkian, Indians, (search)
Europeans in the seventeenth century. It was composed of several tribes, the most important of which were the Ottawas, Chippewas, Sacs and Foxes, Menomonees, Miamis, Pottawattomies, Kickapoos, Illinois, Shawnees, Powhatans, Corees, Nanticokes, Lenni-Lenapes or Delawares, Mohegans, the New England Indians, the Abenakes, and Miemaes. There were smaller independent tribes, the principal of which were the Susquehannas in Pennsylvania; the Mannahoacs in the hill-country between the York and Potomac rivers; and the Monacans, on the headwaters of the James River, Virginia. All of these tribes were divided into cantons or clans, sometimes so small as to afford a war-party of only forty men. The domain of the Algonkians covered a vast region, bounded on the north and northeast by the Eskimos; on the northwest by the Knistenaux and Athabascas; on the west by the Dakotas; on the south by the Catawbas, Cherokees, Mobilians, and Natchez; and on the east by Nova Scotia. West of the Missipssippi,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, John, 1744- (search)
might become a liberator was conceived so early as 1839. In May, 1859, he made his first movement in an attempt to liberate the slaves in Virginia, which ended so disastrously to himself at Harper's Ferry. There seemed to be a peculiar serenity and calmness in the public mind about public affairs in the fall of 1859, when suddenly a rumor went out of Baltimore that the abolitionists had seized the government armory and arsenal at Harper's Ferry, at the junction of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, and that a general insurrection of the slaves in Virginia was imminent. The rumor was mostly true. John Brown had suddenly appeared at Harper's Ferry with a few followers, to induce the slaves of Virginia to rise in insurrection and assert their right to freedom. With a few white followers and twelve slaves from Missouri, he went into Canada West, and at Chatham a convention of sympathizers was held in May, 1859, whereat a Provisional Constitution and Ordinances for the People of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harper's Ferry, (search)
Harper's Ferry, A town in Jefferson county, W. Va.; 49 miles northwest of Washington; at the junction of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers; the scene of several stirring events during the Civil War period. Within twenty-four hours after the passage of the ordinance of secession by the Virginia convention, April 17, 1861, the authorities of that State set forces in motion to seize the United States armory and arsenal in the town, in which the national government had 10,000 muskets made every year, and in which from 80,000 to 90,000 stand of arms were generally stored. When the secession movement began, at the close of 1860, measures were taken for the security of this post. A small body of United States dragoons, under the command of Lieut. Roger Jones, was sent there as a precautionary measure. After the attack on Fort Sumter, rumors reached Harper's Ferry that the government property there would be speedily seized by the Virginians. The rumors were true. On the morning of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wrecks. (search)
rolina coast; about 100 lives lost......Jan. 31, 1878 American steamer Emily B. Souder founders off Cape Hatteras, N. C.; thirty-eight lives lost......Dec. 10, 1878 Thirteen American fishing schooners founder off George's Bank, Newfoundland; 144 lives lost......Feb. 12-16, 1879 American steamer Champion wrecked in collision with ship Lady Octavia, 15 miles from Delaware light-ship; thirty-one lives lost......Nov. 7, 1879 American steamer Narraganset wrecked in collision near Cornfield Point shoal, Long Island Sound; twenty-seven lives lost......June 11, 1880 American steamer Seawanhaka burned off Ward's Island, N. Y.; twenty-four lives lost......June 28, 1880 American steamer San Salvador lost at sea while making a trip from Honduras to Cuba; twenty-nine lives lost......August, 1880 Steamer City of Vera Cruz founders off Florida coast; sixty-eight lives lost......Aug. 29, 1880 Steamer Bahama founders between Porto Rico and New York; twenty lives lost......Feb.